9 nights onboard MSC Splendida

Turkey, Greece, Italy

Eco-ship MSC Splendida carries you in comfort, style and luxury to the most desirable cruise destinations in the world, while at the same time being a beautiful destination in her own right. With so much to see and do on board, every day on MSC Splendida promises travellers of all ages a world of new discoveries, before they even step ashore.

Leaving from: Istanbul
Cruise ship: MSC Splendida
Visiting: Istanbul Corfu Bari Trieste
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MSC Cruises

MSC Cruises may be headquartered in Switzerland, but the ambience onboard its 23 ships is very much Italian owing to its owners, the Aponte family.

Ships feature a two-storey Mediterranean-style promenade and Instagram-worthy glass staircases filled with Swarovski crystals.

The line’s flagship is the 6,327 passenger MSC Euribia, which is MSC's second ship to run on liquefied natural gas.

4363
Passengers
1370
Crew
2009
Launched
137936t
Tonnage
333m
Length
38m
Width
23kts
Speed
14
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Istanbul, Turkey
Day 3
Corfu, Greece
Day 4
Bari, Italy
Day 5
Trieste, Italy
Day 7
Katakolon, Greece
Day 8
Piraeus, Greece
Day 9
Kusadasi, Turkey
Day 10
Istanbul, Turkey
Istanbul, Turkey image
Day 1
Istanbul, Turkey
Welcome to Istanbul, where the echoes of ancient empires resound through the city's majestic skyline. Here, amidst the confluence of Europe and Asia, cruise lines dock to unveil the treasures of this historic metropolis. Blessed with a Mediterranean climate and vibrant energy, Istanbul offers a sensory feast for those seeking an authentic escape from the ordinary. From bustling bazaars to tranquil mosques, the city showcases the real essence of Turkey, where tradition and modernity intertwine. And did you know? Istanbul is the only city in the world that straddles two continents, bridging the gap between East and West with its timeless allure.
Corfu, Greece image
Day 3
Corfu, Greece
Corfu town today is a vivid tapestry of cultures—a sophisticated weave, where charm, history, and natural beauty blend. Located about midway along the island's east coast, this spectacularly lively capital is the cultural heart of Corfu and has a remarkable historic center that UNESCO designated as a World Heritage Site in 2007. All ships and planes dock or land near Corfu town, which occupies a small peninsula jutting into the Ionian Sea.Whether arriving by ferry from mainland Greece or Italy, from another island, or directly by plane, catch your breath by first relaxing with a coffee or a gelato in Corfu town's shaded Liston Arcade, then stroll the narrow lanes of its pedestrians-only quarter. For an overview of the immediate area, and a quick tour of Mon Repos palace, hop on the little tourist train that runs from May to September. Corfu town has a different feel at night, so book a table at one of its famed tavernas to savor the island's unique cuisine.The best way to get around Corfu town is on foot. The town is small enough so that you can easily walk to every sight. There are local buses, but they do not thread their way into the streets (many now car-free) of the historic center. If you are arriving by ferry or plane, it's best to take a taxi to your hotel. Expect to pay about €10 from the airport or ferry terminal to a hotel in Corfu town. If there are no taxis waiting, you can call for one.
Bari, Italy image
Day 4
Bari, Italy

Bari, capital of the province of Apulia, lies on southern Italy's scenic Adriatic coast. Its busy port is a leading commercial and industrial centre, as well as a transit point for travellers catching ferries across the Adriatic to Greece.

Bari comprises a new and an old town. To the north, on a promontory between the old and new harbours, lies the picturesque old town, or Citta Vecchia, with a maze of narrow, crooked streets. To the south is the spacious and regularly planned new town, which has developed considerably since 1930, when the Levant Fair was first held here.

The heart of the modern town is Piazza della Liberta. The busy thoroughfare, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, separates the new town from the old. At the eastern end of the Corso begins the Lungomare Nazario Sauro, a magnificent seafront promenade that runs along the old harbour. Bari and the Apulian region were long recognized for their strategic location, attracting a succession of colonizers such as the Normans, Moors and Spaniards, each leaving their mark.

Trieste, Italy image
Day 5
Trieste, Italy
Nestled on the sparkling shores of the Adriatic, Trieste beckons with a captivating blend of maritime grandeur and cosmopolitan charm. Its illustrious past as a bustling port city echoes through its winding streets, where tales of trade and conquests whisper through the centuries. Trieste's mild Mediterranean climate, tempered by the Adriatic Sea, offers a serene respite for cruisegoers seeking solace away from the bustling tourist hubs. Here, authenticity reigns supreme, with hidden gems awaiting discovery around every corner, from quaint cafes serving local delicacies to historic landmarks steeped in intrigue. As a gateway to Eastern Europe, Trieste's bustling Piazza Unità d'Italia stands as one of the largest sea-facing squares in Europe, a testament to the city's enduring maritime legacy.
Katakolon, Greece image
Day 7
Katakolon, Greece
Katakolon could not seem less of a cruise port if it tried. A tiny enclave clinging to the western Peloponnese coast, it's a sleepy place except when ships dock. But it's a popular cruise destination because of its proximity to Olympia. Ancient Olympia was one of the most important cities in classical Greece. The Sanctuary of Zeus was the city's raison d'être, and attracted pilgrims from around the eastern Mediterranean, and later the city played host to Olympic Games, the original athletic games that were the inspiration for today's modern sporting pan-planetary meet. At the foot of the tree-covered Kronion hill, in a valley near two rivers, Katakolon is today one of the most popular ancient sites in Greece. If you don't want to make the trip to Olympia, then Katakolon is an ideal place for a leisurely Greek lunch while you watch the fishermen mend their nets, but there's just not much else to do there.
Piraeus, Greece image
Day 8
Piraeus, Greece
It's no wonder that all roads lead to the fascinating and maddening metropolis of Athens. Lift your eyes 200 feet above the city to the Parthenon, its honey-color marble columns rising from a massive limestone base, and you behold architectural perfection that has not been surpassed in 2,500 years. But, today, this shrine of classical form dominates a 21st-century boomtown. To experience Athens—Athína in Greek—fully is to understand the essence of Greece: ancient monuments surviving in a sea of cement, startling beauty amid the squalor, tradition juxtaposed with modernity. Locals depend on humor and flexibility to deal with the chaos; you should do the same. The rewards are immense. Although Athens covers a huge area, the major landmarks of the ancient Greek, Roman, and Byzantine periods are close to the modern city center. You can easily walk from the Acropolis to many other key sites, taking time to browse in shops and relax in cafés and tavernas along the way. From many quarters of the city you can glimpse "the glory that was Greece" in the form of the Acropolis looming above the horizon, but only by actually climbing that rocky precipice can you feel the impact of the ancient settlement. The Acropolis and Filopappou, two craggy hills sitting side by side; the ancient Agora (marketplace); and Kerameikos, the first cemetery, form the core of ancient and Roman Athens. Along the Unification of Archaeological Sites promenade, you can follow stone-paved, tree-lined walkways from site to site, undisturbed by traffic. Cars have also been banned or reduced in other streets in the historical center. In the National Archaeological Museum, vast numbers of artifacts illustrate the many millennia of Greek civilization; smaller museums such as the Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art Museum and the Byzantine and Christian Museum illuminate the history of particular regions or periods. Athens may seem like one huge city, but it is really a conglomeration of neighborhoods with distinctive characters. The Eastern influences that prevailed during the 400-year rule of the Ottoman Empire are still evident in Monastiraki, the bazaar area near the foot of the Acropolis. On the northern slope of the Acropolis, stroll through Plaka (if possible by moonlight), an area of tranquil streets lined with renovated mansions, to get the flavor of the 19th-century's gracious lifestyle. The narrow lanes of Anafiotika, a section of Plaka, thread past tiny churches and small, color-washed houses with wooden upper stories, recalling a Cycladic island village. In this maze of winding streets, vestiges of the older city are everywhere: crumbling stairways lined with festive tavernas; dank cellars filled with wine vats; occasionally a court or diminutive garden, enclosed within high walls and filled with magnolia trees and the flaming trumpet-shaped flowers of hibiscus bushes. Formerly run-down old quarters, such as Thission, Gazi and Psirri, popular nightlife areas filled with bars and mezedopoleia (similar to tapas bars), are now in the process of gentrification, although they still retain much of their original charm, as does the colorful produce and meat market on Athinas. The area around Syntagma Square, the tourist hub, and Omonia Square, the commercial heart of the city about 1 km (½ mi) northwest, is distinctly European, having been designed by the court architects of King Otho, a Bavarian, in the 19th century. The chic shops and bistros of ritzy Kolonaki nestle at the foot of Mt. Lycabettus, Athens's highest hill (909 feet). Each of Athens's outlying suburbs has a distinctive character: in the north is wealthy, tree-lined Kifissia, once a summer resort for aristocratic Athenians, and in the south and southeast lie Glyfada, Voula, and Vouliagmeni, with their sandy beaches, seaside bars, and lively summer nightlife. Just beyond the city's southern fringes is Piraeus, a bustling port city of waterside fish tavernas and Saronic Gulf views.
Kusadasi, Turkey image
Day 9
Kusadasi, Turkey
Welcome to Kusadasi, where the sands of time reveal tales of ancient civilizations and maritime adventures. Here, amidst the gentle Mediterranean climate and azure waters, cruise lines dock to unveil the treasures of this historic port city. Kusadasi offers an authentic escape from the typical tourist traps, with its winding streets, bustling markets, and welcoming locals. As a showcase for the real Turkey, Kusadasi boasts a rich culinary scene, where traditional Turkish delights tantalize the taste buds. And did you know? Kusadasi is home to the ancient city of Ephesus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, attracting travelers from far and wide to marvel at its majestic ruins.
Istanbul, Turkey image
Day 10
Istanbul, Turkey
Welcome to Istanbul, where the echoes of ancient empires resound through the city's majestic skyline. Here, amidst the confluence of Europe and Asia, cruise lines dock to unveil the treasures of this historic metropolis. Blessed with a Mediterranean climate and vibrant energy, Istanbul offers a sensory feast for those seeking an authentic escape from the ordinary. From bustling bazaars to tranquil mosques, the city showcases the real essence of Turkey, where tradition and modernity intertwine. And did you know? Istanbul is the only city in the world that straddles two continents, bridging the gap between East and West with its timeless allure.
Ship Details
MSC Cruises
MSC Splendida

Eco-ship MSC Splendida carries you in comfort, style and luxury to the most desirable cruise destinations in the world, while at the same time being a beautiful destination in her own right. With so much to see and do on board, every day on MSC Splendida promises travellers of all ages a world of new discoveries, before they even step ashore.

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