Nagasaki's Blossoms, Atomic Bomb Museum & Mt. Fuji

With 3-night stay in Tokyo

Cruise, stay & land tour

  • Mt. Fuji & Hakone Tour with Bullet Train - Enjoy a day of taking in the different views of Mt. Fuji. First, you will travel to the Hakone Sky Gondola for a ride over the Owakudani Valley, where you will see sulphur fields, as well as views out to Lake Ashinoko and Mt. Fuji. You will enjoy a short stop in Owakudani before moving onto Lake Ashi for a cruise. This lake, formed by a volcanic eruption 3,000 years ago is set with Mt. Fuji as the backdrop. With most of the shores not particularly developed, you can enjoy some beautiful scenery and mountain views. This is followed by the Shinkansen (Bullet train) back to Tokyo, where the tour completes at Odawara station where you are free to continue exploring, or travel back to the hotel if you wish.
  • Omura Koen Park & Peace and Memorial Park/Museum Shore Excursion - Nagasaki Port - This morning you will visit Omura Koen Park, known to be one of Nagasaki's best spots for Cherry Blossoms (sighting can never be 100% guaranteed). With approximately 2,000 cherry trees of multiple varieties it is a sight to behold. Omura Koen Park is particularly special because it offers in the region of 300 Omura Zakura trees - a rare variety of Cherry Blossom. This blossom blooms in several layers, has large numbers of petals and has similarities to the appearance of a rose. After lunch, move to Nagasaki's Atomic Bomb Museum. The museum is dedicated to the events of the 9th August, 1945, when an atomic bomb destroyed Nagasaki and caused the deaths of tens of thousands of people. Take some time to learn about the history surrounding this awful day. The tour concludes with a trip to Nagasaki Peace Park, featuring a couple of relaxing parks and the opportunity to take some photos.
  • Suica Travel Card pre-loaded with 1,500 Yen. Use your card on JR East trains, the subway, monorail and buses. Additionally, you can use the credit to purchase soft drinks and coffee from train vending machines, or small items from convenience stores.
Prices Available
21st March 2025
£3349
  • Departure Date: 21st March 2025
  • Total Nights: 16 Nights
  • Cruise: Diamond Princess
  • Package Type: Cruise and Stay
  • Includes Outbound Flight
  • Includes Inbound Flight
From
£3349 *pp
Princess Cruises logo
Princess Cruises

Credited with introducing millions of Americans to the concept of a modern cruise holiday, Princess Cruises is still innovating to this day.

Sporting a fleet of 15 ships with capacities ranging from 2,000 to 3,660 passengers, the line is best known for its Alaskan cruises, but travels to destinations the world over.

With an emphasis on destination leadership and local expertise, Princess is an excellent choice for the discerning traveller seeking to sail in comfort.

2670
Passengers
1100
Crew
2004
Launched
2019
Last refit
115875t
Tonnage
290m
Length
48.5m
Width
22kts
Speed
19
Decks
USD
Currency
Overview
  • done Return flights from the UK
  • done 2-night stay in Toyko
  • done 11-night full-board cruise
  • done 24-hour complimentary room service
  • done State-of-the-art fitness centre
  • done Specialty dining
  • done Port and Handling fees & taxes
  • done Movies under the stars
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1-2
Outbound flight from the UK to Tokyo, Japan
Outbound flight from the UK to Tokyo, Japan
Day 2-5
Tokyo hotel stay
2-night stay in Tokyo
Day 4
Mt. Fuji with Bullet Train & Lunch
Mount Fuji with Bullet Train & Lunch
Day 5
Embark and set sail
Embark at Tokyo / Yokohama, Kanagawa and set sail
Day 6
At sea
At sea
Day 7
Hiroshima
Visit Hiroshima, Japan
Day 8
Scenic Cruising Kanmon Straits
Scenic Cruising Kanmon Straits
Day 9
Busan
Visit Busan, South Korea
Day 10
Nagasaki
Visit Nagasaki, Japan
Day 10
Nagasaki - Omura Koen Park, Atomic Bomb Museum & Peace Park
Nagasaki - Omura Koen Park, Atomic Bomb Museum & Peace Park
Day 11
Kagoshima
Visit Kagoshima, Japan
Day 12
Matsuyama
Visit Matsuyama, Japan
Day 13
Kochi
Visit Kochi, Japan
Day 14
Kobe
Visit Kobe, Japan
Day 15
Shimizu (for Mt. Fuji)
Visit Shimizu (for Mt. Fuji), Japan
Day 16
Disembark at Tokyo / Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
Disembark at Tokyo / Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
Day 16-17
Return flight to the UK
Return flight to the UK
Outbound flight from the UK to Tokyo, Japan image
Day 1-2
Outbound flight from the UK to Tokyo, Japan
Outbound flight from the UK to Tokyo, Japan
Tokyo hotel stay image
Day 2-5
Tokyo hotel stay
2-night stay in Tokyo
Mt. Fuji with Bullet Train & Lunch image
Day 4
Mt. Fuji with Bullet Train & Lunch
Mount Fuji with Bullet Train & Lunch
Embark and set sail image
Day 5
Embark and set sail
In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.
At sea image
Day 6
At sea
At sea
Hiroshima image
Day 7
Hiroshima
Visit Hiroshima, Japan
Scenic Cruising Kanmon Straits image
Day 8
Scenic Cruising Kanmon Straits
Scenic Cruising Kanmon Straits
Busan image
Day 9
Busan
White-sand city beaches and hot-spring resorts may not be everyone's first image of Korea, but these are what Koreans flock to Busan for all year. And there are plenty of opportunities for rest, relaxation, retail therapy, and even a touch of glamour every October with the Busan International Film Festival. Busan's beaches are the big summertime draw but there is plenty to be seen year round. Quintessential experiences include taking some rest and relaxation at a local spa and exploring the Beomeosa temple complex.
Nagasaki image
Day 10
Nagasaki
Nagasaki city has developed into one of the most important port cities in Japan. During Japan’s period of isolation in the 17th century, Nagasaki played a prominent role in foreign trade relation and only a very few ports were open to restricted numbers of foreign traders. Even though Holland was a major country who conducted trading during this period, Dutch people were only allowed to stay in Dejima Island and were not allowed to have contact with the Japanese people. Today, you will still find the strong influence of Dutch and Chinese culture in the city which is very different from all other cities in Japan. In the more recent history, Nagasaki became the second city after Hiroshima to be destroyed by an atomic bomb towards the end of World War II. From the visit to Atomic bomb museum and peace memorial park, people could understand how chaotic the situation was and the agony that the people in the days have experienced from the damage inflicted by the atomic bomb. It continues to appeal to the world with their wish for world peace.
Nagasaki - Omura Koen Park, Atomic Bomb Museum & Peace Park image
Day 10
Nagasaki - Omura Koen Park, Atomic Bomb Museum & Peace Park
Nagasaki city has developed into one of the most important port cities in Japan. During Japan’s period of isolation in the 17th century, Nagasaki played a prominent role in foreign trade relation and only a very few ports were open to restricted numbers of foreign traders. Even though Holland was a major country who conducted trading during this period, Dutch people were only allowed to stay in Dejima Island and were not allowed to have contact with the Japanese people. Today, you will still find the strong influence of Dutch and Chinese culture in the city which is very different from all other cities in Japan. In the more recent history, Nagasaki became the second city after Hiroshima to be destroyed by an atomic bomb towards the end of World War II. From the visit to Atomic bomb museum and peace memorial park, people could understand how chaotic the situation was and the agony that the people in the days have experienced from the damage inflicted by the atomic bomb. It continues to appeal to the world with their wish for world peace.
Kagoshima image
Day 11
Kagoshima
Kagoshima city is the capital of Kagoshima prefecture and also Kyushu’s southernmost major city. This city is often compared to its Italian sister city Naples, due to its’s similarities such as mild climate and active volcano, Sakurajima. Sakurajima is one of the most renowned active volcanos not only in Japan but also in the whole entire world. This smoking Sakurajima is centred in Kinko Bay and is one of the main symbols of this prefecture. We cannot talk about Sakurajima without the history of continuous eruption. Sakurajima used to be an isolated island; however, the land has banded together with Osumi peninsula from the eruption in 1914. You may have a chance to see the smoke coming from the top of Sakurajima depending on the weather condition. Not only does the scenery of Sakurajima represent the beauty of Kagoshima City but Senganen garden is also symbolic to elegance in the Kagoshima region. This Japanese garden was constructed by a feudal lord, Mitsuhisa Shimazu, as a guest house of the Kagoshima castle which attracts many visitors for its splendid view.
Matsuyama image
Day 12
Matsuyama
Visit Matsuyama, Japan
Kochi image
Day 13
Kochi
Visit Kochi, Japan
Kobe image
Day 14
Kobe
Located on the calm waters of the Inland Sea, Kobe has served as an important port town for hundreds of years. It was one of the first harbours to accept foreign traders in 1868 when Japan was just emerging from its centuries of isolation. What followed was a surge of Western trade and exports. Today, Kobe is quite multicultural, with expatriates from 98 different nations in residence, providing a cultural diversity most easily visible in restaurants serving every kind of cuisine, including the now world famous Kobe beef. The Great Hanshin Earthquake of 1995 set back Kobe’s development, but not for long. Kobe emerged more vibrant than before - with additional attractions, hotels and urban redevelopment, and only a few remnants of the extensive damage. It is a cosmopolitan place with lively shopping arcades, interesting museums, great restaurants, and a port that is still at the heart of things. Kobe is well known for its nightlife, in an intimate quarter of neon lights, cosy bars and sophisticated nightclubs. It also serves as the gateway to the ancient Japanese capitals of Kyoto and Nara.
Shimizu (for Mt. Fuji) image
Day 15
Shimizu (for Mt. Fuji)
The salt and pepper cone of Japan's most famous natural landmark won’t fail to take your breath away, as it soars into the sky in a vision of spectacular symmetry. Make sure your camera is fully prepared before you dock in Shimizu’s port, where unparalleled views of the extraordinary Mount Fuji’s dramatic peak await. Take your time to soak up one of Japan's most iconic views, before dipping your toes into the rest of what this destination of tranquil temples has to offer. While there’s a bustling fish market, and a charming amusement park waiting close to the port, most new arrivals immediately set off in pursuit of the best views of Mount Fuji, or to see the stunning panorama on offer from the heights of the Kunozan Toshogu Shrine. Take the cable car up to the top, to experience the tranquillity around the forested shrine, and to enjoy its stunning architecture of deep scarlets and gleaming golds. You can also enjoy heart-stopping views out over the Bay of Suruga, and the tea plantations below.
Disembark at Tokyo / Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan image
Day 16
Disembark at Tokyo / Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.
Return flight to the UK image
Day 16-17
Return flight to the UK
In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.
Ship Details
Princess Cruises
Diamond Princess

Tour our vessels, from staterooms to public venues

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Your Hotel Stay

Hotel To Be Confirmed By Iglu On Booking

Total Nights: 3 Night Stay
Description:
The hotel will be confirmed by Iglu on booking
Flights Included

Outbound Flight

Departure Date:
21st March 2025
Location:
Outbound flight from the UK to Tokyo

Inbound Flight

Arrival Date:
05th April 2025
Location:
Inbound flight from Tokyo to the UK
Customer Reviews
4.3
out of 3 customer reviews
Cruise Overall
4.3
Ship
4.3
Dining
4
Service Onboard
4.7
Accomodation
4.3
Public Rooms
4.3
Embark & Disembark
4.3
Shore Excursions
4.3
Value For Money
4.3

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