Weekend Rivieras from Barcelona

with 2-night stay in Barcelona

Cruise & Stay Package

  • Luxurious accommodation
  • Included gratuities and room service
  • A selection of included drinks
  • A variety of dining venues to choose from, including speciality and casual restaurants
  • A magical selection of entertainment in the Cabaret Lounge
  • Unlimited self-service laundry

Bespoke Handcrafted Flash Sale - Book by 30th April and Save Up to £50pp & reduced deposits + Up to $1000 Onboard Spend Per Stateroom PLUS More Inclusive Drinks & Gratuities Included! - Excludes GTY Staterooms!

Prices Available
24th September 2024
£1229
  • Departure Date: 24th September 2024
  • Total Nights: 6 Nights
  • Cruise: Azamara Onward
  • Package Type: Cruise and Stay
  • Includes Outbound Flight
  • Includes Inbound Flight
From
£1249 *pp
Azamara logo
Azamara

Sold by Royal Caribbean Group in January 2021, Azamara is already expanding under its new owners, Sycamore Partners. The destination-focused line has brought forth a ship, Azamara Onward - the former Pacific Princess - which, like the rest of the fleet, is a Renaissance Cruises R-class. But regular customers needn't worry.

In fact, they'll notice little change under the new ownership, as many itineraries will continue to be based on single countries, with late nights and overnight stays in port. The signature AzAmazing evenings - exclusive shore-based cultural events - and optional pre or post-cruise land tours are also staying.

692
Passengers
375
Crew
1999
Launched
2022
Last refit
30277t
Tonnage
180m
Length
25m
Width
19kts
Speed
11
Decks
USD
Currency
Overview
  • done Return flights from the UK
  • done 4-night cruise
  • done 2-night stay in Barcelona
  • done Gratuities Included
  • done Exclusive savings
  • done Transfers included
  • done Up to $1000 onboard spend per stateroom
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Outbound flight from the UK to Barcelona
Outbound flight from the UK to Barcelona
Day 1-3
Barcelona hotel stay
2-night Barcelona hotel stay
Day 3
Embark and set sail
Embark at Barcelona and set sail
Day 4
St. Tropez
St. Tropez, France
Day 5
Nice
Nice, France
Day 6
Toulon
Toulon, France
Day 7
Disembark at Barcelona
Disembark at Barcelona, Spain
Day 7
Return flight to the UK
Return flight to the UK
Outbound flight from the UK to Barcelona image
Day 1
Outbound flight from the UK to Barcelona
Outbound flight from the UK to Barcelona
Barcelona hotel stay image
Day 1-3
Barcelona hotel stay
2-night Barcelona hotel stay
Embark and set sail image
Day 3
Embark and set sail
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
St. Tropez image
Day 4
St. Tropez
At first glance, it really doesn't look all that impressive. There's a pretty port with cafés charging €5 for a coffee and a picturesque old town in sugared-almond hues, but there are many prettier in the hills nearby. There are sandy beaches, rare enough on the Riviera, and old-fashioned squares with plane trees and pétanque players, but these are a dime a dozen throughout Provence. So what made St-Tropez an internationally known locale? Two words: Brigitte Bardot. When this pulpeuse (voluptuous) teenager showed up in St-Tropez on the arm of Roger Vadim in 1956 to film And God Created Woman, the heads of the world snapped around. Neither the gentle descriptions of writer Guy de Maupassant (1850–93), nor the watercolor tones of Impressionist Paul Signac (1863–1935), nor the stream of painters who followed (including Matisse and Bonnard) could focus the world's attention on this seaside hamlet as did this one sensual woman in a scarf, Ray-Bans, and capris. Vanity Fair ran a big article, "Saint Tropez Babylon," detailing the over-the-top petrodollar parties, megayachts, and Beyoncé–d paparazzi. But don't be turned off: the next year, Stewart, Tabori & Chang released an elegant coffee-table book, Houses of St-Tropez, packed with photos of supremely tasteful and pretty residences, many occupied by fashion designers, artists, and writers. Once a hangout for Colette, Anaïs Nin, and Françoise Sagan, the town still earns its old moniker, the "Montparnasse of the Mediterranean." Yet you might be surprised to find that this byword for billionaires is so small and insulated. The lack of train service, casinos, and chain hotels keeps it that way. Yet fame, in a sense, came too fast for St-Trop. Unlike the chic resorts farther east, it didn't have the decades-old reputation of the sort that would attract visitors all year around. For a good reason: its location on the south side of the gulf puts it at the mercy of the terrible mistral winter winds. So, in summer the crowds descend and the prices rise into the stratosphere. In July and August, you must be carefree about the sordid matter of cash. After all, at the most Dionysian nightclub in town, a glass of tap water goes for $37 and when the mojo really gets going, billionaires think nothing of "champagne-spraying" the partying crowds—think World Series celebrations but with $1,000 bottles of Roederer Cristal instead of Gatorade. Complaining about summer crowds, overpricing, and lack of customer service has become a tourist sport and yet this is what makes St-Tropez—described by the French daily newspaper Le Figaro as the place you can see "the greatest number of faces per square meter"—as intriguing as it is seductive.
Nice image
Day 5
Nice
United with France only since 1860, Nice has its own history and atmosphere, which dates back 230,000 years. It was on Colline du Château (now château-less) and at the Plage des Ponchettes, in front of the Old Town, that the Greeks established a market-port in 350 BC and named it Nikaia, which would become Marseilles' chief coastal rival. The Romans established themselves a little later on the hills of Cimiez (Cemenelum), already previously occupied by Ligurians and Celts, and quickly overshadowed the waterfront port. After falling to the Saracen invasions, Nice regained power as an independent state, becoming an important port in the early Middle Ages.So cocksure did it become that in 1388, Nice, along with the hill towns behind, effectively seceded from the county of Provence, under Louis d'Anjou, and allied itself with Savoie. Thus began its liaison with the House of Savoy, and through it with Piedmont and Sardinia, it was the Comté de Nice (Nice County). This relationship lasted some 500 years, tinting the culture, architecture, and dialect in rich Italian hues.By the 19th century Nice was flourishing commercially, locked in rivalry with the neighboring shipping port of Genoa. Another source of income: the dawning of tourism, as first the English, then the Russian nobility, discovered its extraordinary climate and superb waterfront position. A parade of fine stone mansions and hotels closed into a nearly solid wall of masonry, separated from the smooth-round rocks of the beach by what was originally named Camin deis Anglés (the English Way), which of course is now the famous Promenade des Anglais. This magnificent crescent, which is seeking UNESCO recognition, is one of the noblest in France. Many of Nice's most delightful attractions—the Cours Saleya market, the Old Town streets, the Hotel Negresco, and the Palais Masséna—are on or close to this 10-km (6-mile) waterfront, making it the first stop for most visitors, while the redevelopment of Nice's port, around the other side of the Colline du Château, makes it easier for amblers who want to take in the Genoese architecture or peruse the antiques at the Puces de Nice, now part of the Promenade des 100 Antiquaires, along Quai Papacino. Nice also has the distinction of the "Family Plus" label, with free strollers, play areas, and restaurants with child-friendly activities.
Toulon image
Day 6
Toulon
Toulon, France
Disembark at Barcelona image
Day 7
Disembark at Barcelona
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Return flight to the UK image
Day 7
Return flight to the UK
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Ship Details
Azamara
Azamara Onward

Step aboard the new Azamara Onward℠, and arrive at the doorstep of the globe’s most hidden gems and storied cities. Built to cross oceans, cruise along scenic waterways and dock at locations larger ships can’t access — this small ship cruising experience is unlike any other.

Find your perfect cruise!
Your Hotel Stay

H10 Marina Barcelona Or Similar

star star star star 4 star hotel
Total Nights: 2 Night Stay
Description:
The hotel will be confirmed by Iglu on booking
Flights Included

Outbound Flight

Departure Date:
27th September 2024
Location:
Outbound flight from London Luton, UK to Barcelona, Spain

Inbound Flight

Arrival Date:
30th September 2024
Location:
Inbound flight from from Barcelona to London Luton, UK
Customer Reviews
4.2
out of 8 customer reviews
Cruise Overall
4.6
Ship
3.6
Dining
4.5
Service Onboard
4.6
Accomodation
4
Public Rooms
4.5
Embark & Disembark
4.5
Shore Excursions
3.5
Value For Money
4.3
Prices from
£1249 *pp