South Pacific Delights from Sydney

Two nights' pre cruise stay in Sydney 35 nights' cruise

Two Nights' Pre Cruise Stay In Sydney 35 Nights' Cruise

Prices Available
15th March 2026
£4119
  • Departure Date: 11th March 2026
  • Total Nights: 39 Nights
  • Cruise: Noordam
  • Package Type: Cruise and Stay
  • Includes Hotel Stay
From
£4119 *pp
Holland America Line logo
Holland America Line

Holland America Line, which has been sailing for 150 years, visits 400 ports in 114 countries every year. Dutch heritage shines through in some of the $4million-worth of artwork to be seen onboard, complimenting the luxurious cruise experience.

Live music remains HAL's forte, with venues including the Rolling Stone Rock room and BB King's Blues Club. For foodies, a wide range of restaurants serve the finest of fayre.

1927
Passengers
820
Crew
2006
Launched
2019
Last refit
82897t
Tonnage
285m
Length
32m
Width
24kts
Speed
11
Decks
USD
Currency
Overview
  • Return flights from UK
  • All transfers
  • Two nights' four-star-hotel stay in Sydney (in featured hotel or similar standard)
  • 35 nights' full-board stateroom accommodation onboard Holland America Line Noordam
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1 to 2
Fly UK to Sydney, Australia
Depart UK for Sydney, 2 nights on the flight
Day 3 to 4
Sydney, Australia
Famous for its beautiful harbour and stunning beaches, Sydney is a must on any visit to Australia. With so much to see and do in this amazing city, its well worth planning ahead to make the most of your time here, especially if you’re only in town for a few days. Perhaps begin by exploring the harbour, with its famous landmarks and take a ferry ride across the harbour to Manly, where you’ll experience fantastic views of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House along the way. Any visit to Sydney wouldn’t be complete without a visit to its iconic beaches and a great way to see these is by taking the Bondi to Bronte walk, a short spectacular coastal trail along epic sandstone cliffs.
Day 4
At Sea
Embark ship
Day 5 to 6
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Day 7
Noumea, New Caledonia
Nouméa is a French city with Polynesian accents, cooled by ocean breezes and set among tropical flowers the size of dinner plates. With one of the healthiest reef systems left on earth, the island’s lagoons, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, hold more than 9,000 species of fish and marine life. The Kanaks, the native people to whom the French first gave cooking lessons, already lived lives rich with fish, taro and coconuts fresh from the tree. And, although the two cultures didn’t always get along, they agreed on one thing: Stick with the prettiest real estate you can find.
Day 8
Easo, Lifou, New Caledonia
Easo is the capital of Lifou, the largest and most populated of the Loyalty Islands. Home to around 10,000 Kanak people, it’s a simple, relatively undeveloped and largely unspoiled place, famed for two things: a sandy palm-fringed beach that fans out on either side of the main dock, and a very friendly atmosphere. Cruise ships are often welcomed to this island paradise with traditional tribal dances as well as a colorful local market that pops up to sell food, drinks and crafts. The island itself offers a diverse landscape that ranges from the steep cliffs of the northern coast to the pristine white-sand beaches and stunning turquoise waters along the southern coast. The island’s many walking paths and trails take in pretty churches—including the famous missionary chapel, the Chapelle Notre Dame de Lourdes—and pass scenic observation points, not to mention a wide variety of wildflowers and plants. Visitors can also tour vanilla plantations to learn about this venerable spice and its production, or make day trips to the nearby island of Tiga.
Day 9
Port Vila, Vanuatu
Located on the scenic island of Efate—population around 45,000—Port-Vila is the capital of Vanuatu. A vibrant and multicultural city, it’s set around a charming bay with views of Iririki and Ifira islands, as well as just the right amount of bustle along its main streets and a pleasant waterfront. Host to Vanuatu's largest harbor and airport, the city is popular with cruise-ship visitors and serves as a great base for all kinds of activities and tours across Efate. In addition to enjoying the many pristine beaches, sandy bays and clear waters that lie along the rugged coastline, it's possible to hike through rain forest jungle and verdant countryside plus admire the island’s many cascading waterfalls and fast-flowing rivers. The port also offers opportunities to learn about the local culture and customs at institutions like the Vanuatu Cultural Centre, the Ekasup Cultural Village and the island’s many markets and restaurants, which offer everything from local to Australian and American cuisine.
Day 10
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Day 11
Suva, Viti Levu, Fiji
In the time before time, the people who would become the Fijians were shaped of wet earth, pulled from the sea on a giant fishhook and given more than 300 islands to live on. Or if you want to be a little more prosaic, the people of Fiji were part of the great Lapita migration, which began somewhere around Taiwan and headed east. The first boats to arrive stopped migrating when they found this maze of islands formed by the earth turning itself inside out with volcanoes.The new Fijians spent a couple centuries involved in internecine war and developed the bad habit of using clubs to bop all strangers. But strangers kept showing up for the simple reason that Fiji, especially the southeast coast of Viti Levu, was geographically wonderful: the kind of spot that made mariners chuck their anchors and start trying to make a living as a settler. And who knows, maybe the Fijians just had tired arms, but by the time missionaries came, powers had shifted and the bopping had stopped.Today that southeast corner of the largest island in Fiji, the city of Suva, holds three-quarters of the nation’s population. It’s also shielded by shimmering green mountains opening to a calm sea, a land lush with afternoon rains.
Day 12
Lautoka, Fiji
Lautoka has a nice, fading colonial vibe with a 100-year-old sugar mill still in operation. The juxtaposition of Muslim mosques and Hindu temples in town, though, captures recent Fiji history in a nutshell. Indo-Fijians, many of whose ancestors had been brought over from India by the British in the 19th century as indentured laborers, eventually amassed enough power to begin buying up local stores and land. When the native Fijians noticed the imbalance, it led to a coup, a countercoup and, in 2006, a counter-countercoup. (Don’t fret: Visitors will not notice a thing. Democratic elections have resumed and all’s well.)Only 15 kilometers (nine miles) from Lautoka’s hustle and bustle is the Koroyanitu National Heritage Park. In an almost magical exception to what usually goes on in the South Pacific, this park contains a fully protected, unlogged cloud forest. Hike to the mountaintop and enjoy endless blue-green views of all those Fijian islands the great European explorers missed from fear of headhunters and cannibals.
Day 13
Dravuni Island, Fiji
During the great age of exploration, when sailors were poking into every unknown corner of the globe, nobody went to the islands of Fiji, including Dravuni, some 65 kilometers (40 miles) to the south of the main island of Fiji. Ships would sail up far enough to see perfect beaches, blue-hole reefs and mountains big enough to be called mountains, but not so big you'd kill yourself hauling a cannon up one.But then the Fijians would appear. Enormous people, faces tattooed in intricate designs, each carrying that one essential of Fijian life: a dark wooden club studded with shark teeth. The cannibal’s best friend.Most of the stories of head-hunting and cannibalism were set in Fiji, where the greatest honors were given to those who brought home the most enemy heads. Since the residents of the archipelago’s 300 islands had been warring with each other for centuries, they saw in the arrival of representatives of the outside world an exciting (and potentially tasty) development.But all things must pass, even cannibal rituals. Life on Fiji changed and these days, Fijians still come down to meet ships and they still carry war clubs, but instead of looking for lunch, they’re looking to yell '' in greeting to as many people as the day allows.
Day 14
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Day 15
Vava u, Tonga
The Vava’u (va-vuh-OO) island group is part of the Kingdom of Tonga—an even larger collection of tropical Pacific Ocean islands. With an ideal year-round climate that’s perfect for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sailing, the islands—which are mostly uninhabited—boast a varied set of attractions for visitors that only begin with their famed white-sand beaches lapped by turquoise waters (with visibility down to 30 meters, or 100 feet) and enchanting coral reefs teeming with abundant marine life like tropical fish, dolphins and sea turtles. In addition to these simple but highly memorable watery pleasures, the Vava’u islands offer tropical forests, limestone cliffs and caves to explore, traditional villages to check out and a wealth of activities ranging from sea kayaking and gamefishing to yachting. Not only can you spot humpback whales (between July and October) and take in the unique atmosphere of historic cemeteries, you can also enjoy a hike up Mount Talau. The island’s tourism infrastructure extends to boutique resorts and ecolodges, as well as plenty of cafés and restaurants, particularly in the main city of Neiafu.
Day 16
Nuku, alofa, Tonga
The Vava’u (va-vuh-OO) island group is part of the Kingdom of Tonga—an even larger collection of tropical Pacific Ocean islands. With an ideal year-round climate that’s perfect for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sailing, the islands—which are mostly uninhabited—boast a varied set of attractions for visitors that only begin with their famed white-sand beaches lapped by turquoise waters (with visibility down to 30 meters, or 100 feet) and enchanting coral reefs teeming with abundant marine life like tropical fish, dolphins and sea turtles. In addition to these simple but highly memorable watery pleasures, the Vava’u islands offer tropical forests, limestone cliffs and caves to explore, traditional villages to check out and a wealth of activities ranging from sea kayaking and gamefishing to yachting. Not only can you spot humpback whales (between July and October) and take in the unique atmosphere of historic cemeteries, you can also enjoy a hike up Mount Talau. The island’s tourism infrastructure extends to boutique resorts and ecolodges, as well as plenty of cafés and restaurants, particularly in the main city of Neiafu.
Day 16
Crossing the International Date LIne
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Day 17
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Day 18
Rarotonga, Cook Islands
The Cook Islands are a South Pacific nation with a traditional Polynesian culture and governmental ties to New Zealand. Of the nation's 15 islands, Rarotonga is the youngest, geologically speaking, and it serves as the point of entry for most visitors. The landscape hints at the relaxed lifestyle its 10,000 residents enjoy: There's only one main road—without a single stoplight—following the 32-kilometer (20-mile) perimeter.The island's most visible landmark is a towering granite pinnacle known as the Needle, which rises from razor-backed ridges. Rarotonga’s other main calling cards are its Muri Lagoon, a dazzling patchwork of soothing blue hues, and its extraordinary people. Cook Islanders have a passion for Polynesian drumming and dancing, which they perform with an old-school, hip-swinging intensity that gets even bystanders’ hearts racing. The singing at Sunday church services is equally inspiring.The capital, Avarua, has fewer than 6,000 people and a handful of shops, restaurants and bars. While scooters are the primary mode of transport, the convenient bus line loops around the island in 55 minutes, which simplifies independent sightseeing and trips to the beach. Sports activities range from leafy treks across the island to diving among lionfish and moray eels.
Day 19
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Day 20
Raiatea, Society Islands, French Polynesia
Most first-time visitors to French Polynesia end up on one of the three best-known Society Islands: Tahiti, Moorea and Bora-Bora. And repeat visitors often head to the Tuamotu Archipelago or the Marquesas Islands, to scuba dive, seek out traditional Polynesian culture or learn about the cultivation of Tahitian black pearls. One of the sleepier Society Islands, Raiatea—located adjacent to Tahaa and within viewing distance of Bora-Bora—offers travelers all those things and more.Cruise lines have discovered the quiet allure of Raiatea, French Polynesia’s second-largest island, home to a flower so rare it grows nowhere else on Earth. Its landscape is dramatic and mountainous—its tallest peak tops ‎1,000 meters (3,330 feet)—fitting for a place whose name means 'faraway heaven.' Tahitians consider this their sacred island, and a journey here will take you to sites associated with legends and lore. But adventure seekers will also find plenty of outdoor activities, including hiking, kayaking, diving and exploring by horseback, while shoppers can browse a handful of shops and the daily market in the port of Uturoa.
Day 21 to 22
Papeete, French Polynesia
When Captain James Cook first sailed to Tahiti in 1769, he and his crew all thought they’d found paradise. Cook hinted at it in his journals, in coy language that would have been acceptable in his day; his men felt considerably less reserve, and returned home sporting tattoos and stories of a people who ate what fell from trees, and lived lives of freedom unknown in Europe. All without much need for clothes.Although all of French Polynesia is sometimes referred to as Tahiti, Tahiti proper is only one island, ringed by a reef that turns the water shades of blue even sapphires can’t come near. Rivers flow down from its high peaks, and every night, the sun goes down behind the neighboring island of Moorea, outlining the mountains like a laser show.Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia, is a bustling business and government center, with black-pearl shops on almost every corner. As you move into the countryside, time starts to slip, and it's just the changeless ocean and the almost unchanged forests—and much the same sensation that made Cook think he'd found heaven on earth.
Day 22
Bahia d Opunoha, Moorea, French Polynesia
Shaped like a heart and crowned with emerald-green spires, Moorea is easy to love. The Magical Island, as it's nicknamed, is celebrated for its untamed landscape and symmetrical side-by-side bays (called Opunohu and Cook's); it was said to be the inspiration for the mythical isle of Bali Hai in James Michener’s Its languid lagoon seems without end, wrapping this 132-square-kilometer (50-square-mile) isle in shades of liquid blue, from pale aqua to intense turquoise. Dolphins and stingrays glide through the waves alongside snorkelers and divers exploring the stunning undersea scene. Venture inland to the valleys and another aspect of island life becomes clear: agricultural abundance, with crops that include pineapples, bananas, taro, sugarcane, coffee and cotton. Moorea has shopping, too, mainly for lustrous Tahitian black pearls and brightly patterned pareus (wraparound skirts).Wherever you head, you'll find the South Pacific you have dreamed of, moving to the leisurely pace of island time. It can be hard to believe Moorea is just 20 kilometers (12 miles) from Tahiti’s bustling capital, Papeete.
Day 23
Fakarava, Tuamotu, French Polynesia
Arriving by sea, you'll experience the innumerable shades of blue that are the lagoon encircling Fakarava, one of the largest atolls in French Polynesia's Tuamotu Archipelago. Once you step ashore, you'll notice the beaches alternate between whitest white and palest pink sand, with a backdrop of coconut trees swaying gently in the tropical breeze. And while this pristine paradise—which counts only around 800 residents on an island 60 kilometers (37 miles) long and 21 kilometers (13 miles) wide—has a healthy tourism industry, it's also a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. That designation means Fakarava, as well as its six neighboring atolls, are entirely protected—both onshore and in the surrounding waters. No wonder then that Fakarava is famous for its incredible snorkeling and diving. A lagoon excursion, which also spirits you to the atoll's most beautiful beach—one accessible only by boat—is a great way to complete your Seven Seas fantasy.
Day 24 to 28
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Day 29
Kona, Hawaii, USA
Both culturally and geographically, Hawaii's Big Island divides into exact halves. The east is jungly, dark and prone to lava flows. The other side, the Kona side, grows all the coffee, and everyone wakes up really, really early. You might even see someone break the speed limit there, which is inconceivable elsewhere in the islands.Much of this drier region almost resembles a desert. But the shapes of the hills and the way rain snags on ridges means Kona holds hundreds of microclimates. That's how the coffee growers have flourished: Variations of only a few feet in altitude can result in very different brews. Some farms cover barely an acre; others sprawl enough to encompass two or three varietals. Either way, the beans are babied—from bush to cup—by hand.Thankfully, plenty of places exist to play and burn off a little caffeine around Kona. History lies thick on the ground, from Kamehameha's (temple) to the sacred buildings of Puuhonua O Honaunau ('The Place of Refuge') to the bay where Captain Cook breathed his last. Whales love the Kona side, spinner dolphins live up to their names, and giant mantas slowly barrel roll up from the depths. Half an island is world enough.
Day 30
Kahului, Maui, USA
Maui is the home of the Luau featuring Hawaiian foods such as kalua pig, cooked in an earthen oven, poi and haupia (coconut pudding). Here you will also find the Haleakala National Park with the magical Waimoku Falls Trail.
Day 31 to 32
Honolulu, USA
Hawaii cruises whisk you to Oahu's south shore. The capital of Hawaii—and gateway to the island chain—is a suitably laid-back Polynesian mash-up of influences and experiences. Away from the Waikiki crowds and glossy high-rise hotels, our Hawaii cruises give a taste of the 'real' Hawaii: brick Victorian buildings, including America's only royal palace; thriving Chinatown nightlife; sacred temple remains on distant bluffs; and the wartime memories of the attack on Pearl Harbor, including the Memorial.Of course, the “real” Hawaii can't be quantified so easily. It's everywhere—in the volcanic nature of the soil, in its lush bounteous flora, and in the positive spirit of the people, who know there's raw magic in their gentle islands. Our cruises to Honolulu offer a deeper understanding of this amazing place.
Day 33
Nawiliwili, Kauai, Hawaii, USA
The oldest of the Hawaiian Islands, Kauai, sits under a steady blast of trade winds that sweep in abundant moisture. Expect a wet, tropical climate—especially in the eastern and central areas—complete with swamps and rain forests.In 1778, when Captain James Cook discovered Hawaii—never mind that plenty of people already lived here—the British explorer sailed right past Oahu, the first island he sighted, and disembarked in Kauai. He and his men spread a few diseases, traded nails for provisions, and left, never to return to Waimea.Kauai only gets about a quarter as many visitors per year as Oahu, yet it may be the island we all know best, thanks to its amazing topography, full of perfect waterfalls and lush knife-edged mountains. It’s called the Garden Isle for good reason and Hollywood can't get enough of this backdrop, from in 1934, all the way through , and the 1976 remake of . If you want to star in your own gorgeous tropical idyll, pack for Kauai.
Day 34 to 38
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Day 39
Fly Seattle, USA to UK
Disembark ship for overnight flight to UK
Fly UK to Sydney, Australia image
Day 1 to 2
Fly UK to Sydney, Australia
Depart UK for Sydney, 2 nights on the flight
Sydney, Australia image
Day 3 to 4
Sydney, Australia
Famous for its beautiful harbour and stunning beaches, Sydney is a must on any visit to Australia. With so much to see and do in this amazing city, its well worth planning ahead to make the most of your time here, especially if you’re only in town for a few days. Perhaps begin by exploring the harbour, with its famous landmarks and take a ferry ride across the harbour to Manly, where you’ll experience fantastic views of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House along the way. Any visit to Sydney wouldn’t be complete without a visit to its iconic beaches and a great way to see these is by taking the Bondi to Bronte walk, a short spectacular coastal trail along epic sandstone cliffs.
At Sea image
Day 4
At Sea
Embark ship
At Sea image
Day 5 to 6
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Noumea, New Caledonia image
Day 7
Noumea, New Caledonia
Nouméa is a French city with Polynesian accents, cooled by ocean breezes and set among tropical flowers the size of dinner plates. With one of the healthiest reef systems left on earth, the island’s lagoons, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, hold more than 9,000 species of fish and marine life. The Kanaks, the native people to whom the French first gave cooking lessons, already lived lives rich with fish, taro and coconuts fresh from the tree. And, although the two cultures didn’t always get along, they agreed on one thing: Stick with the prettiest real estate you can find.
Easo, Lifou, New Caledonia image
Day 8
Easo, Lifou, New Caledonia
Easo is the capital of Lifou, the largest and most populated of the Loyalty Islands. Home to around 10,000 Kanak people, it’s a simple, relatively undeveloped and largely unspoiled place, famed for two things: a sandy palm-fringed beach that fans out on either side of the main dock, and a very friendly atmosphere. Cruise ships are often welcomed to this island paradise with traditional tribal dances as well as a colorful local market that pops up to sell food, drinks and crafts. The island itself offers a diverse landscape that ranges from the steep cliffs of the northern coast to the pristine white-sand beaches and stunning turquoise waters along the southern coast. The island’s many walking paths and trails take in pretty churches—including the famous missionary chapel, the Chapelle Notre Dame de Lourdes—and pass scenic observation points, not to mention a wide variety of wildflowers and plants. Visitors can also tour vanilla plantations to learn about this venerable spice and its production, or make day trips to the nearby island of Tiga.
Port Vila, Vanuatu image
Day 9
Port Vila, Vanuatu
Located on the scenic island of Efate—population around 45,000—Port-Vila is the capital of Vanuatu. A vibrant and multicultural city, it’s set around a charming bay with views of Iririki and Ifira islands, as well as just the right amount of bustle along its main streets and a pleasant waterfront. Host to Vanuatu's largest harbor and airport, the city is popular with cruise-ship visitors and serves as a great base for all kinds of activities and tours across Efate. In addition to enjoying the many pristine beaches, sandy bays and clear waters that lie along the rugged coastline, it's possible to hike through rain forest jungle and verdant countryside plus admire the island’s many cascading waterfalls and fast-flowing rivers. The port also offers opportunities to learn about the local culture and customs at institutions like the Vanuatu Cultural Centre, the Ekasup Cultural Village and the island’s many markets and restaurants, which offer everything from local to Australian and American cuisine.
At Sea image
Day 10
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Suva, Viti Levu, Fiji image
Day 11
Suva, Viti Levu, Fiji
In the time before time, the people who would become the Fijians were shaped of wet earth, pulled from the sea on a giant fishhook and given more than 300 islands to live on. Or if you want to be a little more prosaic, the people of Fiji were part of the great Lapita migration, which began somewhere around Taiwan and headed east. The first boats to arrive stopped migrating when they found this maze of islands formed by the earth turning itself inside out with volcanoes.The new Fijians spent a couple centuries involved in internecine war and developed the bad habit of using clubs to bop all strangers. But strangers kept showing up for the simple reason that Fiji, especially the southeast coast of Viti Levu, was geographically wonderful: the kind of spot that made mariners chuck their anchors and start trying to make a living as a settler. And who knows, maybe the Fijians just had tired arms, but by the time missionaries came, powers had shifted and the bopping had stopped.Today that southeast corner of the largest island in Fiji, the city of Suva, holds three-quarters of the nation’s population. It’s also shielded by shimmering green mountains opening to a calm sea, a land lush with afternoon rains.
Lautoka, Fiji image
Day 12
Lautoka, Fiji
Lautoka has a nice, fading colonial vibe with a 100-year-old sugar mill still in operation. The juxtaposition of Muslim mosques and Hindu temples in town, though, captures recent Fiji history in a nutshell. Indo-Fijians, many of whose ancestors had been brought over from India by the British in the 19th century as indentured laborers, eventually amassed enough power to begin buying up local stores and land. When the native Fijians noticed the imbalance, it led to a coup, a countercoup and, in 2006, a counter-countercoup. (Don’t fret: Visitors will not notice a thing. Democratic elections have resumed and all’s well.)Only 15 kilometers (nine miles) from Lautoka’s hustle and bustle is the Koroyanitu National Heritage Park. In an almost magical exception to what usually goes on in the South Pacific, this park contains a fully protected, unlogged cloud forest. Hike to the mountaintop and enjoy endless blue-green views of all those Fijian islands the great European explorers missed from fear of headhunters and cannibals.
Dravuni Island, Fiji image
Day 13
Dravuni Island, Fiji
During the great age of exploration, when sailors were poking into every unknown corner of the globe, nobody went to the islands of Fiji, including Dravuni, some 65 kilometers (40 miles) to the south of the main island of Fiji. Ships would sail up far enough to see perfect beaches, blue-hole reefs and mountains big enough to be called mountains, but not so big you'd kill yourself hauling a cannon up one.But then the Fijians would appear. Enormous people, faces tattooed in intricate designs, each carrying that one essential of Fijian life: a dark wooden club studded with shark teeth. The cannibal’s best friend.Most of the stories of head-hunting and cannibalism were set in Fiji, where the greatest honors were given to those who brought home the most enemy heads. Since the residents of the archipelago’s 300 islands had been warring with each other for centuries, they saw in the arrival of representatives of the outside world an exciting (and potentially tasty) development.But all things must pass, even cannibal rituals. Life on Fiji changed and these days, Fijians still come down to meet ships and they still carry war clubs, but instead of looking for lunch, they’re looking to yell '' in greeting to as many people as the day allows.
At Sea image
Day 14
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Vava u, Tonga image
Day 15
Vava u, Tonga
The Vava’u (va-vuh-OO) island group is part of the Kingdom of Tonga—an even larger collection of tropical Pacific Ocean islands. With an ideal year-round climate that’s perfect for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sailing, the islands—which are mostly uninhabited—boast a varied set of attractions for visitors that only begin with their famed white-sand beaches lapped by turquoise waters (with visibility down to 30 meters, or 100 feet) and enchanting coral reefs teeming with abundant marine life like tropical fish, dolphins and sea turtles. In addition to these simple but highly memorable watery pleasures, the Vava’u islands offer tropical forests, limestone cliffs and caves to explore, traditional villages to check out and a wealth of activities ranging from sea kayaking and gamefishing to yachting. Not only can you spot humpback whales (between July and October) and take in the unique atmosphere of historic cemeteries, you can also enjoy a hike up Mount Talau. The island’s tourism infrastructure extends to boutique resorts and ecolodges, as well as plenty of cafés and restaurants, particularly in the main city of Neiafu.
Nuku, alofa, Tonga image
Day 16
Nuku, alofa, Tonga
The Vava’u (va-vuh-OO) island group is part of the Kingdom of Tonga—an even larger collection of tropical Pacific Ocean islands. With an ideal year-round climate that’s perfect for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sailing, the islands—which are mostly uninhabited—boast a varied set of attractions for visitors that only begin with their famed white-sand beaches lapped by turquoise waters (with visibility down to 30 meters, or 100 feet) and enchanting coral reefs teeming with abundant marine life like tropical fish, dolphins and sea turtles. In addition to these simple but highly memorable watery pleasures, the Vava’u islands offer tropical forests, limestone cliffs and caves to explore, traditional villages to check out and a wealth of activities ranging from sea kayaking and gamefishing to yachting. Not only can you spot humpback whales (between July and October) and take in the unique atmosphere of historic cemeteries, you can also enjoy a hike up Mount Talau. The island’s tourism infrastructure extends to boutique resorts and ecolodges, as well as plenty of cafés and restaurants, particularly in the main city of Neiafu.
Crossing the International Date LIne image
Day 16
Crossing the International Date LIne
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
At Sea image
Day 17
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Rarotonga, Cook Islands image
Day 18
Rarotonga, Cook Islands
The Cook Islands are a South Pacific nation with a traditional Polynesian culture and governmental ties to New Zealand. Of the nation's 15 islands, Rarotonga is the youngest, geologically speaking, and it serves as the point of entry for most visitors. The landscape hints at the relaxed lifestyle its 10,000 residents enjoy: There's only one main road—without a single stoplight—following the 32-kilometer (20-mile) perimeter.The island's most visible landmark is a towering granite pinnacle known as the Needle, which rises from razor-backed ridges. Rarotonga’s other main calling cards are its Muri Lagoon, a dazzling patchwork of soothing blue hues, and its extraordinary people. Cook Islanders have a passion for Polynesian drumming and dancing, which they perform with an old-school, hip-swinging intensity that gets even bystanders’ hearts racing. The singing at Sunday church services is equally inspiring.The capital, Avarua, has fewer than 6,000 people and a handful of shops, restaurants and bars. While scooters are the primary mode of transport, the convenient bus line loops around the island in 55 minutes, which simplifies independent sightseeing and trips to the beach. Sports activities range from leafy treks across the island to diving among lionfish and moray eels.
At Sea image
Day 19
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Raiatea, Society Islands, French Polynesia image
Day 20
Raiatea, Society Islands, French Polynesia
Most first-time visitors to French Polynesia end up on one of the three best-known Society Islands: Tahiti, Moorea and Bora-Bora. And repeat visitors often head to the Tuamotu Archipelago or the Marquesas Islands, to scuba dive, seek out traditional Polynesian culture or learn about the cultivation of Tahitian black pearls. One of the sleepier Society Islands, Raiatea—located adjacent to Tahaa and within viewing distance of Bora-Bora—offers travelers all those things and more.Cruise lines have discovered the quiet allure of Raiatea, French Polynesia’s second-largest island, home to a flower so rare it grows nowhere else on Earth. Its landscape is dramatic and mountainous—its tallest peak tops ‎1,000 meters (3,330 feet)—fitting for a place whose name means 'faraway heaven.' Tahitians consider this their sacred island, and a journey here will take you to sites associated with legends and lore. But adventure seekers will also find plenty of outdoor activities, including hiking, kayaking, diving and exploring by horseback, while shoppers can browse a handful of shops and the daily market in the port of Uturoa.
Papeete, French Polynesia image
Day 21 to 22
Papeete, French Polynesia
When Captain James Cook first sailed to Tahiti in 1769, he and his crew all thought they’d found paradise. Cook hinted at it in his journals, in coy language that would have been acceptable in his day; his men felt considerably less reserve, and returned home sporting tattoos and stories of a people who ate what fell from trees, and lived lives of freedom unknown in Europe. All without much need for clothes.Although all of French Polynesia is sometimes referred to as Tahiti, Tahiti proper is only one island, ringed by a reef that turns the water shades of blue even sapphires can’t come near. Rivers flow down from its high peaks, and every night, the sun goes down behind the neighboring island of Moorea, outlining the mountains like a laser show.Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia, is a bustling business and government center, with black-pearl shops on almost every corner. As you move into the countryside, time starts to slip, and it's just the changeless ocean and the almost unchanged forests—and much the same sensation that made Cook think he'd found heaven on earth.
Bahia d Opunoha, Moorea, French Polynesia image
Day 22
Bahia d Opunoha, Moorea, French Polynesia
Shaped like a heart and crowned with emerald-green spires, Moorea is easy to love. The Magical Island, as it's nicknamed, is celebrated for its untamed landscape and symmetrical side-by-side bays (called Opunohu and Cook's); it was said to be the inspiration for the mythical isle of Bali Hai in James Michener’s Its languid lagoon seems without end, wrapping this 132-square-kilometer (50-square-mile) isle in shades of liquid blue, from pale aqua to intense turquoise. Dolphins and stingrays glide through the waves alongside snorkelers and divers exploring the stunning undersea scene. Venture inland to the valleys and another aspect of island life becomes clear: agricultural abundance, with crops that include pineapples, bananas, taro, sugarcane, coffee and cotton. Moorea has shopping, too, mainly for lustrous Tahitian black pearls and brightly patterned pareus (wraparound skirts).Wherever you head, you'll find the South Pacific you have dreamed of, moving to the leisurely pace of island time. It can be hard to believe Moorea is just 20 kilometers (12 miles) from Tahiti’s bustling capital, Papeete.
Fakarava, Tuamotu, French Polynesia image
Day 23
Fakarava, Tuamotu, French Polynesia
Arriving by sea, you'll experience the innumerable shades of blue that are the lagoon encircling Fakarava, one of the largest atolls in French Polynesia's Tuamotu Archipelago. Once you step ashore, you'll notice the beaches alternate between whitest white and palest pink sand, with a backdrop of coconut trees swaying gently in the tropical breeze. And while this pristine paradise—which counts only around 800 residents on an island 60 kilometers (37 miles) long and 21 kilometers (13 miles) wide—has a healthy tourism industry, it's also a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. That designation means Fakarava, as well as its six neighboring atolls, are entirely protected—both onshore and in the surrounding waters. No wonder then that Fakarava is famous for its incredible snorkeling and diving. A lagoon excursion, which also spirits you to the atoll's most beautiful beach—one accessible only by boat—is a great way to complete your Seven Seas fantasy.
At Sea image
Day 24 to 28
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Kona, Hawaii, USA image
Day 29
Kona, Hawaii, USA
Both culturally and geographically, Hawaii's Big Island divides into exact halves. The east is jungly, dark and prone to lava flows. The other side, the Kona side, grows all the coffee, and everyone wakes up really, really early. You might even see someone break the speed limit there, which is inconceivable elsewhere in the islands.Much of this drier region almost resembles a desert. But the shapes of the hills and the way rain snags on ridges means Kona holds hundreds of microclimates. That's how the coffee growers have flourished: Variations of only a few feet in altitude can result in very different brews. Some farms cover barely an acre; others sprawl enough to encompass two or three varietals. Either way, the beans are babied—from bush to cup—by hand.Thankfully, plenty of places exist to play and burn off a little caffeine around Kona. History lies thick on the ground, from Kamehameha's (temple) to the sacred buildings of Puuhonua O Honaunau ('The Place of Refuge') to the bay where Captain Cook breathed his last. Whales love the Kona side, spinner dolphins live up to their names, and giant mantas slowly barrel roll up from the depths. Half an island is world enough.
Kahului, Maui, USA image
Day 30
Kahului, Maui, USA
Maui is the home of the Luau featuring Hawaiian foods such as kalua pig, cooked in an earthen oven, poi and haupia (coconut pudding). Here you will also find the Haleakala National Park with the magical Waimoku Falls Trail.
Honolulu, USA image
Day 31 to 32
Honolulu, USA
Hawaii cruises whisk you to Oahu's south shore. The capital of Hawaii—and gateway to the island chain—is a suitably laid-back Polynesian mash-up of influences and experiences. Away from the Waikiki crowds and glossy high-rise hotels, our Hawaii cruises give a taste of the 'real' Hawaii: brick Victorian buildings, including America's only royal palace; thriving Chinatown nightlife; sacred temple remains on distant bluffs; and the wartime memories of the attack on Pearl Harbor, including the Memorial.Of course, the “real” Hawaii can't be quantified so easily. It's everywhere—in the volcanic nature of the soil, in its lush bounteous flora, and in the positive spirit of the people, who know there's raw magic in their gentle islands. Our cruises to Honolulu offer a deeper understanding of this amazing place.
Nawiliwili, Kauai, Hawaii, USA image
Day 33
Nawiliwili, Kauai, Hawaii, USA
The oldest of the Hawaiian Islands, Kauai, sits under a steady blast of trade winds that sweep in abundant moisture. Expect a wet, tropical climate—especially in the eastern and central areas—complete with swamps and rain forests.In 1778, when Captain James Cook discovered Hawaii—never mind that plenty of people already lived here—the British explorer sailed right past Oahu, the first island he sighted, and disembarked in Kauai. He and his men spread a few diseases, traded nails for provisions, and left, never to return to Waimea.Kauai only gets about a quarter as many visitors per year as Oahu, yet it may be the island we all know best, thanks to its amazing topography, full of perfect waterfalls and lush knife-edged mountains. It’s called the Garden Isle for good reason and Hollywood can't get enough of this backdrop, from in 1934, all the way through , and the 1976 remake of . If you want to star in your own gorgeous tropical idyll, pack for Kauai.
At Sea image
Day 34 to 38
At Sea
Relax and make the most of the myriad of facilities available on board the ship, from fantastic entertainment to delicious and diverse dining options.
Fly Seattle, USA to UK image
Day 39
Fly Seattle, USA to UK
Disembark ship for overnight flight to UK
Ship Details
Holland America Line
Noordam

Named for the Northern compass point, Noordam dazzles with museum-quality art and lavish staterooms. Guests of this Vista Class cruise ship will have their pick of onboard activities.

Find your perfect cruise!
Your Hotel Stay

The York By Swiss-Belhotel, Sydney

4 star hotel
Total Nights: 2 Night Stay
Customer Reviews
4.2
out of 4 customer reviews
Cruise Overall
4.3
Ship
4.3
Dining
4.3
Service Onboard
4.5
Accomodation
3.8
Public Rooms
4.5
Embark & Disembark
4.5
Shore Excursions
3.8
Value For Money
4

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