No-Fly Ireland, Scotland & Northern Europe

No-Fly cruise from Southampton

No-fly cruise

Black Friday sale - Brand New Promotion | SAVINGS of up to 50%

Book an Ocean View Stateroom or above by 8pm 30th November 2023 and receive a free Champagne & Flutes Gift Box

Prices Available
15th August 2024
£1499
  • Departure Date: 15th August 2024
  • Total Nights: 11 Nights
  • Cruise: Norwegian Dawn
  • Package Type: Cruise Only
From
£1499 *pp
 logo
2340
Passengers
1032
Crew
2002
Launched
2016
Last refit
92250t
Tonnage
294m
Length
38m
Width
25kts
Speed
11
Decks
USD
Currency
Overview
  • done 11 night full-board cruise
  • done Included Speciality Dining
  • done Included Wi-Fi
  • done Included Shore Excursion Credit
  • done Included Premium Drinks Package
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Embark and set sail
Embark at Southampton and set sail
Day 2
At sea
At sea
Day 3
Edinburgh (Newhaven)
Visit Edinburgh (Newhaven)
Day 4
Kirkwall, Orkney Isles
Visit Kirkwall, Orkney Isles
Day 5
Glasgow (Greenock)
Visit Glasgow (Greenock)
Day 6
Dublin (Dun Laoghaire)
Visit Dublin (Dun Laoghaire), Republic of Ireland
Day 7
Belfast
Visit Belfast, Northern Ireland
Day 8
Cork
Visit Cork, Republic of Ireland
Day 9
Portland
Visit Portland, UK
Day 10
Brussels / Brugge (Zeebrugge)
Visit Brussels / Brugge (Zeebrugge), Belgium
Day 11
Paris (Le Havre)
Visit Paris (Le Havre), France
Day 12
Disembark at Southampton
Disembark at Southampton
Embark and set sail image
Day 1
Embark and set sail

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

At sea image
Day 2
At sea
At sea
Edinburgh (Newhaven) image
Day 3
Edinburgh (Newhaven)
Newhaven is a district in the City of Edinburgh, Scotland, between Leith and Granton and about 2 miles north of the city centre, just north of the Victoria Park district. Formerly a village and harbour on the Firth of Forth.
Kirkwall, Orkney Isles image
Day 4
Kirkwall, Orkney Isles
In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.
Glasgow (Greenock) image
Day 5
Glasgow (Greenock)
Nestled behind lofty city walls, Londonderry is a destination of culture, which boasts an increasingly envied reputation. This Northern Irish city is still riding on the momentum of a fantastic 2013, when it was named as UK City of Culture, and singled out as one of Lonely Planet's top 5 destinations to visit. The wonderfully preserved city walls are perhaps Londonderry's most treasured charm, and they encircle 1,450 years of history, and are over 400 years old. The walls came to the fore of the city's history during the Siege of Derry, back in 1688 - when King James's forces attacked, causing mass starvation and suffering over 105 days of stalemate. It takes approximately an hour to wander the entire circuit of the walls, and see their seven gates, and you’ll absorb a feast of information along the way. View the mighty cannons that boomed during the siege, or stop into one of the plentiful cafes, should you need a little refreshment before continuing your journey. St. Columb’s Cathedral, which dates back to 1633, towers over the walled city, and is one of the city's most significant historic sites. Its dreamy spire contains a set of bells that have peeled out melodies here since 1638, making them Ireland's oldest.
Dublin (Dun Laoghaire) image
Day 6
Dublin (Dun Laoghaire)
Visit Dublin (Dun Laoghaire), Republic of Ireland
Belfast image
Day 7
Belfast
Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.
Cork image
Day 8
Cork

The last port of call on the Titanic’s ill-fated voyage, the seaside town on Ireland’s south coast has a historic maritime legacy. One of the major transatlantic Irish ports, Cobh (pronounced ‘Cove’ and formerly known as Queenstown) was also the departure point for 2.5 million of the six million Irish people who emigrated to North America between 1848 and 1950. While visitors flock to Cobh to learn about its fascinating maritime and emigration history, they will also find the picturesque town blessed with a beautiful cathedral and a burgeoning bar and restaurant scene.

Portland image
Day 9
Portland
The Isle of Portland is a tied island, 6 kilometres long by 2.7 kilometres wide, in the English Channel. The southern tip, Portland Bill lies 8 kilometres south of the resort of Weymouth, forming the southernmost point of the county of Dorset, England. A barrier beach called Chesil Beach joins it to the mainland.
Brussels / Brugge (Zeebrugge) image
Day 10
Brussels / Brugge (Zeebrugge)
In 1895 work began to construct a new seaport and harbour next to the tiny village of Zeebrugge, situated on the North Sea coast. Today the fast-expanding port of Zeebrugge is one of the busiest in Europe and its marina is Belgium’s most important fishing port. Many attempts were made to destroy this important port during both World Wars. Zeebrugge is ideally located for discovering the historic city of Bruges, and delightful seaside resorts with long sandy beaches can be visited by using the trams that run the whole length of the Belgian coast. Please note that no food may be taken ashore in Belgium. We shall not be offering shuttle buses to Bruges, but you may visit the city on an optional excursion: those visiting Bruges should note that there may be quite a long walk from the coach to the town centre.
Paris (Le Havre) image
Day 11
Paris (Le Havre)
Le Havre, founded by King Francis I of France in 1517, is located inUpper Normandy on the north bank of the mouth of the River Seine, which isconsidered the most frequented waterway in the world. Its port is ranked thesecond largest in France. The city was originally built on marshland andmudflats that were drained in the 1500’s. During WWII most of Le Havre wasdestroyed by Allied bombing raids. Post war rebuilding of the city followed thedevelopment plans of the well-known Belgian architect Auguste Perre. Thereconstruction was so unique that the entire city was listed as a UNESCO WorldHeritage Site in 2005. 
Disembark at Southampton image
Day 12
Disembark at Southampton

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Ship Details
Customer Reviews
4.2
out of 4 customer reviews
Cruise Overall
4
Ship
4
Dining
4
Service Onboard
4.5
Accomodation
4.5
Public Rooms
4
Embark & Disembark
4
Shore Excursions
4.3
Value For Money
4.3

Similar package deals

No-fly cruise

No-Fly Northern European Cities

  • 10 nights, departs on the 10th Oct 2024
  • 10 night full-board cruise
  • Included Speciality Dining
  • Included Wi-Fi
  • Included Shore Excursion Credit
  • Included Premium Drinks Package
  • Cruise info: Norwegian Cruise Lines,
  • Itinerary: Embark and set sail, Le Havre (Paris), Zeebrugge +8 more
Now from £1,239 *pp
No-fly cruise

Norway & Iceland Explorer

  • 14 nights, departs on the 14th Sep 2025
  • 14 night full-board cruise
  • Included Speciality Dining
  • Included Wi-Fi
  • Included Shore Excursion Credit
  • Included Premium Drinks Package
  • Cruise info: Norwegian Cruise Lines,
  • Itinerary: Embark and set sail, Paris (Le Havre), At sea +11 more
Now from £2,299 *pp
No-fly cruise

No-Fly Ireland Discovery

  • 10 nights, departs on the 8th May 2024
  • 10 night full-board cruise
  • Included Speciality Dining
  • Included Wi-Fi
  • Included Shore Excursion Credit
  • Included Premium Drinks Package
  • Cruise info: Norwegian Cruise Lines,
  • Itinerary: Embark and set sail, Waterford, Belfast +7 more
Now from £1,229 *pp
Prices from
£1499 *pp