22 nights onboard Seabourn Ovation

22-Day Mediterranean Magic & Tyrrhenian Treasures

Winners 2022 Grand Prix Award
Winners 2022 Best Specialist Cruise Line
Winners 2022 Best for Wellbeing Spas
Winners 2022 Best for Accommodation

Introducing Seabourn Ovation, the sister-ship to the already prestigious Seabourn Encore.

Leaving from: Barcelona
Cruise ship: Seabourn Ovation
Visiting: Barcelona Ibiza Mahón, Menorca Cagliari
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Seabourn

For decadent luxury that sails hand-in-hand with personalised experience and in-depth access to world heritage, may we introduce Seabourn Cruises.

Blending nimble power and grace with beautifully designed spaces, Seabourn ships can be likened to lavish resorts. Except, uniquely, the staff already know you just as they also remember your favourite drink.

604
Passengers
450
Crew
2018
Launched
40350t
Tonnage
210m
Length
28m
Width
19kts
Speed
12
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Barcelona, Spain
Day 2
Ibiza, Spain
Day 3
Mahón, Menorca, Spain
Day 5
Cagliari, Italy
Day 6
Bonifacio, Corsica, France
Day 7
Portoferraio, Italy
Day 8
Portovenere, Italy
Day 9
Cannes, France
Day 10
La Ciotat, France
Day 11
Monte-Carlo, Monaco
Day 12
Porto Santo Stefano, Italy
Day 13
Capri, Italy
Day 14
Giardini Naxos, Italy
Day 15
Valletta, Malta
Day 15
Mgarr, Gozo, Malta
Day 16
Valletta, Malta
Day 18
Ajaccio, Corsica, France
Day 19
Saint-Tropez, France
Day 20
Palamós, Spain
Day 21
Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Day 23
Civitavecchia, Italy
Barcelona, Spain image
Day 1
Barcelona, Spain
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Ibiza, Spain image
Day 2
Ibiza, Spain
Hedonistic and historic, Eivissa (Ibiza, in Castilian) is a city jam-packed with cafés, nightspots, and trendy shops; looming over it are the massive stone walls of Dalt Vila —the medieval city declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999—and its Gothic cathedral. Squeezed between the north walls of the old city and the harbor is Sa Penya, a long labyrinth of stone-paved streets that offer some of the city's best offbeat shopping, snacking, and exploring. The tourist information office on Vara de Rey has a useful map of walks through the old city.
Mahón, Menorca, Spain image
Day 3
Mahón, Menorca, Spain
The capital of Menorca since 1721, Mahon has a impressive natural deep water harbour, which is one of the largest in the world. This, coupled with its strategic location, has made it a stronghold for many nations throughout history. Mahon has an abundance of historical buildings, the oldest being the Arch of Saint Roc which is all that remains of the wall that once encircled the whole town. The island was occupied by the British during the 18th century and Lord Nelson is thought to have stayed there. Indeed, San Antoni Mansion, located on the north side of the harbour, houses a collection of Nelson memorabilia. The legacy of colonial rule can be seen in the muted Georgian style of some of the buildings, but Mahon still boasts attractive examples of neo-Classical, Baroque and Romanesque architecture. With narrow streets to explore, pleasant shaded squares and welcoming pavement cafés, there is something for everyone to enjoy. Please be aware that most shops in town close for a siesta between 1330 and 1730.
Cagliari, Italy image
Day 5
Cagliari, Italy

Known in Sardinia as Casteddu, Cagliari will enchant and cast a spell on you, just as it did on the famed writer D.H Lawrence. Lawrence proclaimed that he found Cagliari to be "strange and rather wonderful, not a bit like Italy".

That's not to say that Italy is un-wonderful. Lawrence basically summarised how most people feel when exploring Cagliari - it's not just another Italian city. There's something quite different here. The city is stratified beyond words, and wonderfully diverse.

Cagliari's diversity is firmly rooted in history. The city was founded during the 8th Century BC by the Phoenicians, before being dominated by the Romans, the Arabs, the Pisans, and the Punics, alongside the Aragonese. Each civilization left its stamp, crafting a multi-layered metropolis for the ages.

Bonifacio, Corsica, France image
Day 6
Bonifacio, Corsica, France
Located in the South of Corsica, Bonifacio is one of the island’s most beautiful destinations. From its breathtaking views and sandy white islands to its historic citadel, the city is a must visit for anyone travelling to the island.
Portoferraio, Italy image
Day 7
Portoferraio, Italy
Elba is the Tuscan archipelago's largest island, but it resembles nearby verdant Corsica more than it does its rocky Italian sisters, thanks to a network of underground springs that keep it lush and green. It's this combination of semitropical vegetation and dramatic mountain scenery—unusual in the Mediterranean—that has made Elba so prized for so long, and the island's uniqueness continues to draw boatloads of visitors throughout the warm months. A car is very useful for getting around the island, but public buses stop at most towns several times a day; the tourist office has timetables.
Portovenere, Italy image
Day 8
Portovenere, Italy
The colorful facades and pedestrians-only calata (promenade) make Portovenere the quintessential Ligurian seaside village. As a UNESCO World Heritage Site, its harbor is lined with tall, thin "terratetto" houses that date from as far back as the 11th century and are connected in a wall-like formation to protect against attacks by the Pisans and local pirates. Its tiny, carruggi (alley-like passageways) lead to an array of charming shops, homes, and gardens and eventually to the village's impressive Castle Doria high on the olive tree covered hill. To the west standing guard over the Mediterranean is the picturesque medieval Chiesa di San Pietro, once the site of a temple to Venus (Venere in Italian), from which Portovenere gets its name. Nearby, in a rocky area leading to the sea, is Byron's Cave, a favorite spot that the poet loved to swim out into the sea from.
Cannes, France image
Day 9
Cannes, France
Cannes is pampered with the luxurious year-round climate that has made it one of the most popular resorts in Europe. Cannes was an important sentinel site for the monks who established themselves on Île St-Honorat in the Middle Ages. Its bay served as nothing more than a fishing port until in 1834 an English aristocrat, Lord Brougham, fell in love with the site during an emergency stopover with a sick daughter. He had a home built here and returned every winter for a sun cure—a ritual quickly picked up by his peers. Between the popularity of Le Train Blue transporting wealthy passengers from Calais, and the introduction in 1936 of France's first paid holidays, Cannes became the destination, a tasteful and expensive breeding ground for the upper-upscale.Cannes has been further glamorized by the ongoing success of its annual film festival, as famous as Hollywood's Academy Awards. About the closest many of us will get to feeling like a film star is a stroll here along La Croisette, the iconic promenade that gracefully curves the wave-washed sand coastline, peppered with chic restaurants and prestigious private beaches. This is precisely the sort of place for which the French invented the verb flâner (to dawdle, saunter): strewn with palm trees and poseurs, its fancy boutiques and status-symbol grand hotels—including the Carlton, the legendary backdrop to Grace Kelly in To Catch a Thief —all vying for the custom of the Louis Vuitton set. This legend is, to many, the heart and soul of the Côte d'Azur.
La Ciotat, France image
Day 10
La Ciotat, France
Monte-Carlo, Monaco image
Day 11
Monte-Carlo, Monaco
On one of the best stretches of the Mediterranean, this classic luxury destination is one of the most sought-after addresses in the world. With all the high-rise towers you have to look hard to find the Belle Époque grace of yesteryear. But if you head to the town's great 1864 landmark Hôtel de Paris—still a veritable crossroads of the buffed and befurred Euro-gentry—or enjoy a grand bouffe at its famous Louis XV restaurant, or attend the opera, or visit the ballrooms of the casino, you may still be able to conjure up Monaco's elegant past. Prince Albert II, a political science graduate from Amherst College, traces his ancestry to Otto Canella, who was born in 1070. The Grimaldi dynasty began with Otto's great-great-great-grandson, Francesco Grimaldi, also known as Frank the Rogue. Expelled from Genoa, Frank and his cronies disguised themselves as monks and in 1297 seized the fortified medieval town known today as Le Rocher (the Rock). Except for a short break under Napoléon, the Grimaldis have been here ever since, which makes them the oldest reigning family in Europe. In the 1850s a Grimaldi named Charles III made a decision that turned the Rock into a giant blue chip. Needing revenue but not wanting to impose additional taxes on his subjects, he contracted with a company to open a gambling facility. The first spin of the roulette wheel was on December 14, 1856. There was no easy way to reach Monaco then—no carriage roads or railroads—so no one came. Between March 15 and March 20, 1857, one person entered the casino—and won two francs. In 1868, however, the railroad reached Monaco, and it was filled with Englishmen who came to escape the London fog. The effects were immediate. Profits were so great that Charles eventually abolished all direct taxes. Almost overnight, a threadbare principality became an elegant watering hole for European society. Dukes (and their mistresses) and duchesses (and their gigolos) danced and dined their way through a world of spinning roulette wheels and bubbling champagne—preening themselves for nights at the opera, where such artists as Vaslav Nijinsky, Sarah Bernhardt, and Enrico Caruso came to perform. Along with the tax system, its sensational position on a broad, steep peninsula that bulges into the Mediterranean—its harbor sparkling with luxury cruisers, its posh mansions angling awnings toward the nearly perpetual sun—continues to draw the rich and famous. One of the latest French celebrities to declare himself "Monégasque," thus giving up his French passport, is superchef Alain Ducasse, who said that he made the choice out of affection for Monaco rather than tax reasons. Pleasure boats vie with luxury cruisers in their brash beauty and Titanic scale, and teams of handsome young men—themselves dyed blond and tanned to match—scour and polish every gleaming surface. As you might expect, all this glitz doesn't come cheap. Eating is expensive, and even the most modest hotels cost more here than in nearby Nice or Menton. As for taxis, they don't even have meters so you are completely at the driver's mercy (with prices skyrocketing during events such as the Grand Prix). For the frugal, Monaco is the ultimate day-trip, although parking is as coveted as a room with a view. At the very least you can afford a coffee at Starbucks. The harbor district, known as La Condamine, connects the new quarter, officially known as Monte Carlo with Monaco-Ville (or Le Rocher), a medieval town on the Rock, topped by the palace, the cathedral, and the Oceanography Museum. Have no fear that you'll need to climb countless steps to get to Monaco-Ville, as there are plenty of elevators and escalators climbing the steep cliffs. But shuttling between the lovely casino grounds of Monte Carlo and Old Monaco, separated by a vast port, is a daunting proposition for ordinary mortals without wings, so hop on the No. 1 bus from Saint Roman, or No. 2 from the Jardin Exotique - Both stop at Place du Casino and come up to Monaco Ville.
Porto Santo Stefano, Italy image
Day 12
Porto Santo Stefano, Italy
Capri, Italy image
Day 13
Capri, Italy
Tour description Capri, Italy Popular since Roman times when the emperors built their villas on Capri, this island is surely one of the world's most famous and beautiful spots. Visiting Capri, it is easy to see why the ancient Romans fell in love with this place 2,000 years ago - the craggy mountains, the sea caves and grottos and the brilliantly colored flowers cast a magic spell then and still capture the admiration of today's travelers. There are sleek yachts moored in the deep blue waters of the bays, and beautiful villas and tiny villages cling to steep slopes. An excellent year-round climate and a breathtaking landscape complete the picture of a storybook island. There are two main villages - Capri Town, site of the popular meeting point "Piazzetta," and Anacapri, the upper town, dominated by 1,750-foot-high Monte Solaro, the highest point on the island. Both remain the "in" scene for international travelers. By spending millions on comfort and style, the island has ensured its continuing success. After a trip to upper-level Anacapri, visitors enjoy strolling the narrow, cobbled streets of Capri Town, browsing in chic boutiques and spending time in the Piazzetta with a drink in one of the outdoor cafés. There is a funicular from the main port of Marina Grande to Capri Town; from Anacapri, a chair lift whisks visitors to the top of Monte Solaro for a spellbinding view. The magical Blue Grotto can be reached by boat from Marina Grande, but entrance into the grotto depends for the most part on sea conditions. Please Note: For your convenience, the shore excursions offered for this port of call are available to reserve in advance at www.silversea.com until August 8 , as well as offered for purchase on board, unless otherwise noted in the description. Going Ashore in Capri Pier Information The ship is scheduled to anchor off Capri's main port, Marina Grande. Guests will be taken ashore via local tenders, arriving at the pier just a short distance from the funicular to Capri Town. Taxis and minibuses are also available near the pier area. Be sure to agree on the fare before starting out. Shopping Capri is a shopping mecca, though by no means inexpensive. Upscale shops and boutiques offer an array of jewelry, designer fashions, resort wear, straw articles and souvenir items. Start from the Piazzetta and the streets fanning out from the square. Some shops may be closed between 12:30/1:00 p.m. and 4:00/4:30 p.m. The local currency is the euro. Cuisine Capri features plenty of open-air eateries in addition to top rated restaurants. Fresh seafood and delicious pasta dishes make for a nice lunch; for a quick meal there are tempting sandwiches and pizza. You might enjoy a hearty Italian table wine with lunch. Other Sights Capri Town La Piazzetta is the main square of Capri Town located just opposite the upper funicular station. The square is an ideal place from where to start exploring or shopping. Sidewalk cafés around the square provide residents and visitors with a popular pastime - people-watching while sipping a drink or enjoying a coffee.   Anacapri Reaching Capri's second town is via local minibus. In addition to numerous souvenir shops and designer boutiques, attractions include Axel Munthe's Villa San Michele and the chair lift to Monte Solaro. Blue Grotto Boat excursions to the Blue Grotto can be booked locally at Marina Grande. Be aware that it is necessary to transfer into smaller boats in front of the grotto. Also, entrance to the grotto is subject to weather and sea conditions. For this reason, tours to the Blue Grotto are frequently cancelled. Private arrangements are not available in this port.
Giardini Naxos, Italy image
Day 14
Giardini Naxos, Italy
Valletta, Malta image
Day 15
Valletta, Malta

Malta: the country that God built. Well, kind of. Malta is well-known for being the once-stronghold of the famous religious military order, The Knights Hospitaller, who were granted the land in 1530 from the King of Spain in exchange for an annual fee of one Maltese falcon (which eventually inspired the name of Dashiell Hammett’s famous novel). And these marauding knights certainly did a great job putting the place together. Valletta, the nation’s capital, remains the highlight and exploring this fascinating walled city (which kept the Hospitallers secure until they came across Napoleon in 1798) is akin to walking back in time. It’s small size (just 0.3 square miles) makes it the perfect cruise stopover and is the ideal base for exploring the rest of the country on excursions.

Mgarr, Gozo, Malta image
Day 15
Mgarr, Gozo, Malta
Valletta, Malta image
Day 16
Valletta, Malta

Malta: the country that God built. Well, kind of. Malta is well-known for being the once-stronghold of the famous religious military order, The Knights Hospitaller, who were granted the land in 1530 from the King of Spain in exchange for an annual fee of one Maltese falcon (which eventually inspired the name of Dashiell Hammett’s famous novel). And these marauding knights certainly did a great job putting the place together. Valletta, the nation’s capital, remains the highlight and exploring this fascinating walled city (which kept the Hospitallers secure until they came across Napoleon in 1798) is akin to walking back in time. It’s small size (just 0.3 square miles) makes it the perfect cruise stopover and is the ideal base for exploring the rest of the country on excursions.

Ajaccio, Corsica, France image
Day 18
Ajaccio, Corsica, France
Considered Corsica’s primary commercial and cultural hub, the largest city and regional capital of Ajaccio is situated on the west coast of the island, approximately 644 km (400 miles) southeast of Marseille, France. Founded in 1492, vestiges of ancient Corsica in this ville impériale revolve around the city’s most famous son, Napoléon Bonaparte, whose family home—now the national museum Maison Bonaparte—pays tribute to the emperor’s historical influence.Remnants from what was originally a 12th-century Genoese colony are still visible around the Old Town near the imposing citadel and watchtower. Perfect for exploring, the luminous seaside city surrounded by snowcapped mountains and pretty beaches offers numerous sites, eateries, side streets, and a popular harbor, where sailboats and fishing vessels moor in the picturesque Tino Rossi port lined with well-established restaurants and cafés serving fresh local fare.
Saint-Tropez, France image
Day 19
Saint-Tropez, France
At first glance, it really doesn't look all that impressive. There's a pretty port with cafés charging €5 for a coffee and a picturesque old town in sugared-almond hues, but there are many prettier in the hills nearby. There are sandy beaches, rare enough on the Riviera, and old-fashioned squares with plane trees and pétanque players, but these are a dime a dozen throughout Provence. So what made St-Tropez an internationally known locale? Two words: Brigitte Bardot. When this pulpeuse (voluptuous) teenager showed up in St-Tropez on the arm of Roger Vadim in 1956 to film And God Created Woman, the heads of the world snapped around. Neither the gentle descriptions of writer Guy de Maupassant (1850–93), nor the watercolor tones of Impressionist Paul Signac (1863–1935), nor the stream of painters who followed (including Matisse and Bonnard) could focus the world's attention on this seaside hamlet as did this one sensual woman in a scarf, Ray-Bans, and capris. Vanity Fair ran a big article, "Saint Tropez Babylon," detailing the over-the-top petrodollar parties, megayachts, and Beyoncé–d paparazzi. But don't be turned off: the next year, Stewart, Tabori & Chang released an elegant coffee-table book, Houses of St-Tropez, packed with photos of supremely tasteful and pretty residences, many occupied by fashion designers, artists, and writers. Once a hangout for Colette, Anaïs Nin, and Françoise Sagan, the town still earns its old moniker, the "Montparnasse of the Mediterranean." Yet you might be surprised to find that this byword for billionaires is so small and insulated. The lack of train service, casinos, and chain hotels keeps it that way. Yet fame, in a sense, came too fast for St-Trop. Unlike the chic resorts farther east, it didn't have the decades-old reputation of the sort that would attract visitors all year around. For a good reason: its location on the south side of the gulf puts it at the mercy of the terrible mistral winter winds. So, in summer the crowds descend and the prices rise into the stratosphere. In July and August, you must be carefree about the sordid matter of cash. After all, at the most Dionysian nightclub in town, a glass of tap water goes for $37 and when the mojo really gets going, billionaires think nothing of "champagne-spraying" the partying crowds—think World Series celebrations but with $1,000 bottles of Roederer Cristal instead of Gatorade. Complaining about summer crowds, overpricing, and lack of customer service has become a tourist sport and yet this is what makes St-Tropez—described by the French daily newspaper Le Figaro as the place you can see "the greatest number of faces per square meter"—as intriguing as it is seductive.
Palamós, Spain image
Day 20
Palamós, Spain
One of the best ways to arrive in Catalonia is by sea, especially via the Costa Brava. This coastline, also known as the Rugged or Wild Coast, stretches from Blanes to the French border. Its name aptly refers to the steep cliff of ancient twisted rocks, which runs its entire length and is bounded inland by the Catalan mountain ranges. The intensity of the coast’s colour, the ruggedness of the rocks and the scent of the plants all combine to add to its attraction. The history of this region is long and varied. Traces can be found of the advanced culture of the Iberians, Greeks, Romans, Visigoths and Arabs. With Wilfred I and the independence of Catalan countries, the Catalan dynasty was born. Later, in 1479, Catalonia became a part of unified Spain following the marriage of Isabel, Queen of Castile, and Fernando, King of Aragon. The port of Palamos, some 36 miles northeast of Barcelona, has been in existence for nearly 700 years thanks to its location on one of the deepest natural bays in the western Mediterranean. The town itself is the southernmost of a series of resorts popular with sun worshippers. For the most part, Palamos has managed to retain some of the charm of a fishing village. The port also serves as a gateway to such inland locations as Girona, the capital of the province. Art lovers may want to visit Figueras, famous for its bizarre Teatre-Museu Dali, the foremost of a series of sites associated with the eccentric surrealist artist, Salvador Dali. If you choose to stay in Palamos, you can enjoy the pleasant atmosphere of the town or spend some time at a nearby beach. The town has a long seagoing tradition and busy harbour. The fish auction, prompted by the arrival of the fishing boats, is a spectacle worth seeing. The Fishing Museum illustrates the history and the life of the families who live off the sea.
Palma de Mallorca, Spain image
Day 21
Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Palma de Mallorca, the largest city on the island of Mallorca, is the capital of Spain’s Balearic Islands and a popular destination among Mediterranean cruisers. The sun-kissed island combines a vibrant city centre and shopping areas with a charming old town, known in Spanish as El Casco Antiguo, where many tourist hotspots can be found. With stunning views allied to great beaches, Gothic, Moorish and Renaissance architecture, as well as tasty regional food, Palma ticks all the boxes.

Civitavecchia, Italy image
Day 23
Civitavecchia, Italy

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here.

Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

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Seabourn
Seabourn Ovation

Introducing Seabourn Ovation, the sister-ship to the already prestigious Seabourn Encore.

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