28 nights onboard Seabourn Sojourn

28-Day Iberian Coast & Jewels Of The British Isles

Winners 2022 Grand Prix Award
Winners 2022 Best Specialist Cruise Line
Winners 2022 Best for Wellbeing Spas
Winners 2022 Best for Accommodation

Seabourn Sojourn enchants her guests with an array of public areas scaled to encourage a relaxed sociability.

Leaving from: Barcelona
Cruise ship: Seabourn Sojourn
Visiting: Barcelona Valencia Cartagena Lisbon
Seabourn Logo
Seabourn

For decadent luxury that sails hand-in-hand with personalised experience and in-depth access to world heritage, may we introduce Seabourn Cruises.

Blending nimble power and grace with beautifully designed spaces, Seabourn ships can be likened to lavish resorts. Except, uniquely, the staff already know you just as they also remember your favourite drink.

450
Passengers
330
Crew
2010
Launched
32000t
Tonnage
198m
Length
25.6m
Width
19kts
Speed
10
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Barcelona, Spain
Day 2
Valencia, Spain
Day 3
Cartagena, Spain
Day 5
Lisbon, Portugal
Day 6
Porto, Portugal
Day 7
Ferrol, Spain
Days 9 - 10
Bordeaux, France
Day 11
La Rochelle, France
Day 13
Saint Hélier, Jersey
Day 14
Portsmouth, England
Day 15
Dover, England
Day 16
Isle of Portland, England
Day 18
Cork, Ireland
Day 19
Fishguard, Wales
Day 20
Douglas, Isle of Man
Day 21
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Day 22
Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland
Day 23
Oban, Scotland
Day 24
Ullapool, Scotland
Day 26
Edinburgh, Scotland
Day 27
Newcastle upon Tyne, England
Day 28
Great Yarmouth, England
Day 29
Dover, England
Barcelona, Spain image
Day 1
Barcelona, Spain
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Valencia, Spain image
Day 2
Valencia, Spain
Valencia, Spain's third-largest municipality, is a proud city with a thriving nightlife and restaurant scene, quality museums, and spectacular contemporary architecture, juxtaposed with a thoroughly charming historic quarter, making it a popular destination year in year out. During the Civil War, it was the last seat of the Republican Loyalist government (1935–36), holding out against Franco’s National forces until the country fell to 40 years of dictatorship. Today it represents the essence of contemporary Spain—daring design and architecture along with experimental cuisine—but remains deeply conservative and proud of its traditions. Though it faces the Mediterranean, Valencia's history and geography have been defined most significantly by the River Turia and the fertile huerta that surrounds it.The city has been fiercely contested ever since it was founded by the Greeks. El Cid captured Valencia from the Moors in 1094 and won his strangest victory here in 1099: he died in the battle, but his corpse was strapped into his saddle and so frightened the besieging Moors that it caused their complete defeat. In 1102 his widow, Jimena, was forced to return the city to Moorish rule; Jaume I finally drove them out in 1238. Modern Valencia was best known for its frequent disastrous floods until the River Turia was diverted to the south in the late 1950s. Since then the city has been on a steady course of urban beautification. The lovely bridges that once spanned the Turia look equally graceful spanning a wandering municipal park, and the spectacularly futuristic Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències (City of Arts and Sciences), most of it designed by Valencia-born architect Santiago Calatrava, has at last created an exciting architectural link between this river town and the Mediterranean. If you're in Valencia, an excursion to Albufera Nature Park is a worthwhile day trip.
Cartagena, Spain image
Day 3
Cartagena, Spain
Lisbon, Portugal image
Day 5
Lisbon, Portugal

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Porto, Portugal image
Day 6
Porto, Portugal

Lively, commercial Oporto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Also called Porto for short, the word easily brings to mind the city's most famous product - port wine. Oporto's strategic location on the north bank of the Douro River has accounted for the town's importance since ancient times.

Ferrol, Spain image
Day 7
Ferrol, Spain
El Ferrol has been inextricably linked to the sea for more than two millennia, being a major shipbuilding centre for most of its history. From its beginnings as a tiny fishing port in the 1st century BC, it endured conquests by Vandals, Suebis, Arabs and Christians. With the arrival of the Bourbons in the 18th century, Ferrol became a leading maritime centre, largely due to its large natural harbour on the Ferrol Inlet, an arm of the Atlantic. Now a large commercial port, Ferrol is also the gateway to the northern Spanish province of Galicia, a region noted for its green mountains, deep gorges and fast-flowing rivers. It is also well placed for visiting the medieval holy city of Santiago de Compostela. Interestingly, Ferrol's city centre is modelled on Lisbon in Portugal, a country with which it has strong historical and linguistic ties. The layout comprises of a rectangle lined with six parallel streets, with two squares on each side. These squares have the city's best shops, restaurants and bars.
Bordeaux, France image
Days 9 - 10
Bordeaux, France
Bordeaux, a city steeped in winemaking tradition, invites you to savor its illustrious past. As the birthplace of renowned vintages, it weaves a tapestry of wine culture that stretches back centuries. Nestled along the Garonne River, Bordeaux enjoys a temperate maritime climate, perfect for viticulture. Beyond its famed vineyards, Bordeaux boasts architectural marvels, including its UNESCO-listed historic center, showcasing the region's rich architectural heritage. As a gateway to the esteemed Bordeaux wine region, cruise lines dock here, allowing travelers to explore prestigious châteaux and sample world-class wines. With its blend of history, wine, and scenic beauty, Bordeaux offers a truly authentic French experience.
La Rochelle, France image
Day 11
La Rochelle, France
Nestled along the Atlantic coast, La Rochelle boasts a maritime legacy steeped in resilience and adventure. Its storied past, from medieval fortifications to bustling ports, echoes through the cobbled streets. The mild oceanic climate blesses visitors with refreshing breezes and abundant sunshine, ideal for leisurely strolls along the picturesque harbors. Unlike bustling metropolises, La Rochelle offers an authentic glimpse into French coastal life, with its vibrant markets and quaint cafes serving up fresh seafood delicacies. As a beacon of maritime history, La Rochelle's iconic towers stand tall, guarding secrets of seafaring adventures that have shaped the region's identity for centuries.
Saint Hélier, Jersey image
Day 13
Saint Hélier, Jersey
Located approximately 12 miles from the Cotentin Peninsula in Normandy (France), and 100 miles from the south coast of Great Britain, the British Crown dependency of Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands and shares a World War II German occupied history.
Portsmouth, England image
Day 14
Portsmouth, England

Portsmouth, or ‘Pompey’ as the locals lovingly refer to it, has many claims to fame, having been the birthplace of the great Charles Dickens and a historic dockyard. The UK’s only island city is home to a host of attractions and landmarks showcasing its rich maritime and literary heritage, all of which can be explored during your cruise stopover.

Dover, England image
Day 15
Dover, England
Known as the gateway of England, Dover welcomes millions of visitors from all over the globe each year in its role as the ferry capital of the world and the second busiest cruise port in the UK. The White Cliffs Country has a rich heritage. Within the walls of the town’s iconic castle, over 2,000 years of history waits to be explored, whilst the town’s museum is home to the Dover Bronze Age Boat, the world’s oldest known seagoing vessel. The town’s cliffs that are a welcome sight for today's cross-channel travellers also served as the control centre for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.
Isle of Portland, England image
Day 16
Isle of Portland, England
The Isle of Portland is a tied island, 6 kilometres long by 2.7 kilometres wide, in the English Channel. The southern tip, Portland Bill lies 8 kilometres south of the resort of Weymouth, forming the southernmost point of the county of Dorset, England. A barrier beach called Chesil Beach joins it to the mainland.
Cork, Ireland image
Day 18
Cork, Ireland
Cork City received its first charter in 1185 from Prince John of Norman England, and it takes its name from the Irish word corcaigh, meaning "marshy place." The original 6th-century settlement was spread over 13 small islands in the River Lee. Major development occurred during the 17th and 18th centuries with the expansion of the butter trade, and many attractive Georgian-design buildings with wide bowfront windows were constructed during this time. As late as 1770 Cork's present-day main streets—Grand Parade, Patrick Street, and the South Mall—were submerged under the Lee. Around 1800, when the Lee was partially dammed, the river divided into two streams that now flow through the city, leaving the main business and commercial center on an island, not unlike Paris's Île de la Cité. As a result, the city has a number of bridges and quays, which, although initially confusing, add greatly to the port's unique character. Cork can be very "Irish" (hurling, Gaelic football, televised plowing contests, music pubs, and peat smoke). But depending on what part of town you're in, Cork can also be distinctly un-Irish—the sort of place where hippies, gays, and farmers drink at the same pub.
Fishguard, Wales image
Day 19
Fishguard, Wales
Gracing the shores of Fishguard lies a storied past steeped in maritime legend. Set against the backdrop of rolling hills and dramatic cliffs, its coastal charm resonates with tales of intrepid voyages and seafaring exploits. The temperate maritime climate here invites travelers to bask in the gentle embrace of oceanic breezes, offering a refreshing respite from the bustle of city life. Fishguard embodies the essence of authentic exploration, where visitors can immerse themselves in the timeless rhythms of coastal living. And as the sun sets over the horizon, the crimson hues illuminate the coastline, casting a spellbinding aura over this maritime haven.
Douglas, Isle of Man image
Day 20
Douglas, Isle of Man
The Isle of Man, situated in the Irish Sea off the west coast of England, is a mountainous, cliff-fringed island and one of Britain’s most beautiful spots. Measuring just 30 miles by 13 miles, the Isle of Man remains semi-autonomous. With its own postage stamps, laws, currency, and the Court of Tynwald (the world’s oldest democratic parliament), the Isle of Man is rich with history and lore.Inhabited from Neolithic times, the island became a refuge for Irish missionaries after the 5th Century. Norsemen took the island during the 9th Century and sold it to Scotland in 1266. However, since the 14th Century, it has been held by England. Manx, the indigenous Celtic language, is still spoken by a small minority. The Isle of Man has no income tax, which has encouraged many Britains to regard the island as a refuge. Otherwise, it is populated by Gaelic farmers, fishermen, and the famous tailless manx cats. The varied landscape features austere moorlands and wooded glens, interspersed by fine castles, narrow-gauge railways, and scores of standing stones with Celtic crosses. The hilly terrain rises to a height of 2,036 feet at Mount Snaefell, which dominates the center of the island.
Belfast, Northern Ireland image
Day 21
Belfast, Northern Ireland
In Belfast, the echoes of its shipbuilding legacy reverberate through time, beckoning travelers to explore its maritime heritage. Amidst the bustling streets, whispers of the Titanic's construction resonate, reminding visitors of the city's pivotal role in maritime history. The climate, kissed by the Irish Sea's bracing winds, offers a refreshing escape for those seeking an authentic experience. Beyond the typical tourist haunts, Belfast unveils hidden gems, from traditional pubs echoing with lively tunes to quaint cobblestone streets steeped in character. As a showcase for Northern Ireland's resilience, Belfast's vibrant spirit endures, captivating cruisegoers with its unwavering charm.
Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland image
Day 22
Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland
Oban, Scotland image
Day 23
Oban, Scotland
Oban, "little bay" in Gaelic, today has a resident population of 8,500 and is the unofficial capital of the West Highlands - the "Gateway to the Isles." The panoramic views of the mountains, lochs and islands which have captivated artists, authors, composers, and poets for centuries are as striking now as they were when Dunollie Castle, a ruined keep which has stood sentinel over the narrow entrance to the sheltered bay for around six hundred years, was the northern outpost of the Dalriadic Scots. It is no surprise to find Oban in the 21st-century remains a magnet for travellers from all over the world. The town's present day popularity owes much to the Victorians, and as early as 1812, when the Comet steamship linked Oban with Glasgow, the town played host to intrepid travellers touring Staffa - the inspiration for Mendelssohn's Hebridean Overture - and Iona - home of Scottish Christianity since St Columba stepped ashore in AD563. Indeed once Oban had the royal seal of approval from Queen Victoria, who called it "one of the finest spots we have seen," the town's destiny as an endearingly enchanting holiday destination was as firmly set as the lava columns of Fingal's Cave in Oban is justifiably known as the “gateway to the Isles.” The town's south pier is the embarkation point for car ferries to Mull, Coll, Tiree, Barra, South Uist, Colonsay, Lismore and Islay. From these islands you can travel further a field to Iona, Staffa and to many of the smaller less well known isles.
Ullapool, Scotland image
Day 24
Ullapool, Scotland
Ullapool is an ideal base for hiking throughout Sutherland and taking wildlife and nature cruises, especially to the Summer Isles. By the shores of salty Loch Broom, the town was founded in 1788 as a fishing station to exploit the local herring stocks. There's still a smattering of fishing vessels, as well as visiting yachts and foreign ships. When their crews fill the pubs, Ullapool has a cosmopolitan feel. The harbor area comes to life when the Lewis ferry arrives and departs.
Edinburgh, Scotland image
Day 26
Edinburgh, Scotland

The magical city of Edinburgh has been captivating visitors for centuries and for good reason. Those new to Scotland’s legendary capital should head straight for its famed attractions, from Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace to the Royal Mile. Seasoned visitors, on the other hand, should consider venturing out of the city centre. The vibrant port neighbourhood of Leith is not just home to the city’s cruise terminal, but it’s also the place to sample some of the best seafood in Scotland, enjoy a waterside stroll or pay a visit to a local microbrewery. And you can’t go to Edinburgh without sampling a dram or two, so call in at The Scotch Whisky Experience on the famous Royal Mile for masterclasses and tastings. Summer visitors can enjoy world-class music, theatre and comedy during the renowned Edinburgh Festival. But there is truly no off season in this great city, and in winter the buzz and excitement around Christmas and Hogmanay make up for the fact that – as they say in these parts – it might be a ‘wee’ bit on the nippy side.

Newcastle upon Tyne, England image
Day 27
Newcastle upon Tyne, England
In Newcastle, where the Tyne River meets the North Sea, you're welcomed by a maritime legacy etched deep in the city's character. Famous for its shipbuilding prowess, Newcastle boasts a rugged charm that mirrors its weather – a blend of bracing sea breezes and hearty sunshine. This unique climate sets the stage for authentic experiences, inviting cruisegoers to explore beyond the beaten path. Nestled amidst iconic landmarks like the Angel of the North, Newcastle offers a taste of England's industrial past alongside vibrant cultural scenes. And did you know? Newcastle's famed bridges, including the Tyne Bridge, inspired the design of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.
Great Yarmouth, England image
Day 28
Great Yarmouth, England
Dover, England image
Day 29
Dover, England
Known as the gateway of England, Dover welcomes millions of visitors from all over the globe each year in its role as the ferry capital of the world and the second busiest cruise port in the UK. The White Cliffs Country has a rich heritage. Within the walls of the town’s iconic castle, over 2,000 years of history waits to be explored, whilst the town’s museum is home to the Dover Bronze Age Boat, the world’s oldest known seagoing vessel. The town’s cliffs that are a welcome sight for today's cross-channel travellers also served as the control centre for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.
Ship Details
Seabourn
Seabourn Sojourn

Seabourn Sojourn enchants her guests with an array of public areas scaled to encourage a relaxed sociability.

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