7 nights onboard MSC Opera

Abu Dhabi, Sir Bani Yas, Dubai, Dubai, Khasab, Muscat, Abu Dhabi

A refined style, precious materials and attention to detail make MSC Opera a cruise ship that really is something to sing about! She is built along more classic lines than her sisters in the Musica and Fantasia classes, making for a special atmosphere on board while enabling you to visit those destinations that are inaccessible to larger vessels.

Leaving from: Abu Dhabi
Cruise ship: MSC Opera
Visiting: Abu Dhabi Sir Bani Yas Island Dubai Dubai
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MSC Cruises

MSC Cruises may be headquartered in Switzerland, but the ambience onboard its 23 ships is very much Italian owing to its owners, the Aponte family.

Ships feature a two-storey Mediterranean-style promenade and Instagram-worthy glass staircases filled with Swarovski crystals.

The line’s flagship is the 6,327 passenger MSC Euribia, which is MSC's second ship to run on liquefied natural gas.

2150
Passengers
728
Crew
2004
Launched
2015
Last refit
65591t
Tonnage
275m
Length
32m
Width
20kts
Speed
9
Decks
EUR
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Day 2
Sir Bani Yas Island, United Arab Emirates
Days 3 - 4
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Day 5
Khasab, Oman
Day 6
Muscat, Oman
Day 8
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates image
Day 1
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Just a few decades ago, Abu Dhabi, the island capital of the United Arab Emirates, was a small fishing village with houses made of mud-brick and palm fronds. Today, as a result of revenue from oil, Abu Dhabi is one of the world's richest cities, with wide, tree-lined okulevards, lush green parks, gushing fountains and imposing skyscrapers. Somewhat of a dichotomy, Abu Dhabi is a combination of ultra-modern sophistication and Arab mystique, with friendly and hospitable people offering a warm welcome to visitors. Abu Dhabi's history originated in the 18th century, when, according to legend, a group of tribesmen pursuing a gazelle came upon a freshwater well which they named Abu Dhabi, or "Father of the Gazelle". In the 19th century, the first fort was built over this well by a sheikh of the Al-Nahyan dynasty. The fort's name is Al Husn Palace, also known as Old or White Fort, and it is one of the few buildings in Abu Dhabi that is more than 25 years old. Its whitewashed walls are eye-catching amid the backdrop of today's skyscrapers. Presently, it is home to the Cultural Foundation and serves as a documents centre. Abu Dhabi had little significance until the discovery of vast oil reserves in the late 1950s and early 1960s. In the years following, the city's economy and infrastructure developed rapidly and changed Abu Dhabi beyond recognition.
Sir Bani Yas Island, United Arab Emirates image
Day 2
Sir Bani Yas Island, United Arab Emirates
Dubai, United Arab Emirates image
Days 3 - 4
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Dubai sits on a golden sandy coastline in the Arabian Gulf, where the warm azure waves of the sea meet the desert. A high-rise oasis, this city is a pleasure-dome surrounded by dunes; one of the most fashionable on the planet thanks to its ability to satisfy the needs of legions of demanding vacationers. Dubai is about having fun—and it's one big adult playground.Nature plays her part here, with year-round sunshine, gorgeous beaches, dramatic arid landscapes, and warm waters, but it's the man-made attractions that make Dubai so alluring. You can launch yourself into high-adrenaline desert adventures, diving and water sports, and some of the world's best golf courses. The 5-, 6-, and 7-star hotels offer the ultimate in luxury, and the party scene is hot. Shopping malls are the biggest in the world and are packed full of high-class merchandise. And with hundreds of restaurants with cuisine from around the world, you can munch your way from Mexico to Malaysia.Dubai is an Arab country with a long history as a trading port. Traces of its traditional life, customs, and architecture can still be seen and explored, but today and tomorrow are much more important than yesterday. Almost every building in this metropolis is less than 20 years old and the most dramatic developments—groundbreaking megaprojects—have just been completed or are still under construction.The city is certainly unique. Islam is its anchor, but it has opened its doors to the rest of the world and has invited them in to work, rest, and play, which creates a truly international atmosphere. Unashamedly modern and materialistic, life here takes place at breakneck speed. The landscape is stark, the confidence is sky high, the can-do spirit is palpable, and the bling is in your face. Dubai produces strong reactions in people, but one thing is certain—love it or loathe it—you will not forget it. It is without a doubt, one of the world's true must-see destinations.Shisha: Smoke Without Fire. Emirati men love socializing, but as they don't drink alcohol they get together over coffee and shisha instead of a drink at the bar after work. The shisha, or hookah, is a smoking device, usually made of glass, that filters smoke through water before it reaches the smoker's mouth. Shisha tobaccos are aromatic and are often mixed with apple, cinnamon, or cherry, so their taste isn't as strong as other tobaccos. Smoking shisha is said to induce relaxation—but you'll have to decide if it's for you!
Khasab, Oman image
Day 5
Khasab, Oman
See Khasab’s jutting fjords, and the dolphins playing in the emerald waters, and it’s forgivable to think you’ve stumbled across a surreal Norway. The burning sun and scorched earth, serve as a constant reminder that you're a long way from Europe, however - although the Portuguese roots mean there's a colonial tint to the city. Sitting on the Northern coast of Oman, reaching across towards Iran, this is an isolated and fascinating destination to explore. The remote location, and limited infrastructure here, until recent times, means Khasab has been left to live life at its own pace, and the city sings to its own song sheet. Even now you can see a blind eye being turned to the smugglers who whisk electronics across the Gulf to Iran, in small speed boats.
Muscat, Oman image
Day 6
Muscat, Oman
Oman's capital city is hemmed in on one side by spectacular jagged-peaked mountains and on the other by royal blue sea. The architecture is a traditional, sophisticated arabesque blend of white-washed, low-rise buildings surrounded by manicured palms, intricately designed domes set atop the minarets of the mosques, sand-colored villas, a surprising blend of modern art installations, like a giant incense burner that towers over the Corniche, and ancient forts set in the rocky hills. Though tradition abounds, from distinct, local cuisine to the widely worn national dress, the dishdasha, Muscat is a completely modern city, featuring opulent luxury hotels, international restaurants, excellent cellular and data service, sprawling shopping malls, pristine beaches, lively nightlife, world-class performing arts, and a highly educated population, most of whom speak English, Arabic, and often Hindi. Muscat is the ideal base for exploring other areas of the country since many of the most desirable destinations are within a few hours' drive.
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates image
Day 8
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Just a few decades ago, Abu Dhabi, the island capital of the United Arab Emirates, was a small fishing village with houses made of mud-brick and palm fronds. Today, as a result of revenue from oil, Abu Dhabi is one of the world's richest cities, with wide, tree-lined okulevards, lush green parks, gushing fountains and imposing skyscrapers. Somewhat of a dichotomy, Abu Dhabi is a combination of ultra-modern sophistication and Arab mystique, with friendly and hospitable people offering a warm welcome to visitors. Abu Dhabi's history originated in the 18th century, when, according to legend, a group of tribesmen pursuing a gazelle came upon a freshwater well which they named Abu Dhabi, or "Father of the Gazelle". In the 19th century, the first fort was built over this well by a sheikh of the Al-Nahyan dynasty. The fort's name is Al Husn Palace, also known as Old or White Fort, and it is one of the few buildings in Abu Dhabi that is more than 25 years old. Its whitewashed walls are eye-catching amid the backdrop of today's skyscrapers. Presently, it is home to the Cultural Foundation and serves as a documents centre. Abu Dhabi had little significance until the discovery of vast oil reserves in the late 1950s and early 1960s. In the years following, the city's economy and infrastructure developed rapidly and changed Abu Dhabi beyond recognition.
Ship Details
MSC Cruises
MSC Opera

A refined style, precious materials and attention to detail make MSC Opera a cruise ship that really is something to sing about! She is built along more classic lines than her sisters in the Musica and Fantasia classes, making for a special atmosphere on board while enabling you to visit those destinations that are inaccessible to larger vessels.

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