22 nights onboard Insignia

African Palette

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

Leaving from: Cape Town
Cruise ship: Insignia
Visiting: Cape Town Lüderitz Walvis Bay Principe
Oceania Cruises Logo
Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

656
Passengers
400
Crew
1999
Launched
2018
Last refit
30277t
Tonnage
180m
Length
25.5m
Width
18kts
Speed
9
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Cape Town, South Africa
Day 2
River travel
Day 3
Lüderitz, Namibia
Day 4
Walvis Bay, Namibia
Days 5 - 7
River travel
Day 8
Principe, Sao Tome and Principe
Day 9
River travel
Day 10
Lome, Togo
Day 11
Takoradi, Ghana
Day 12
Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Days 13 - 14
River travel
Day 15
Banjul, Gambia
Day 16
River travel
Day 17
Mindelo, São Vicente Island, Cape Verde
Days 18 - 19
River travel
Day 20
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
Day 21
River travel
Days 22 - 23
Lisbon, Portugal
Cape Town, South Africa image
Day 1
Cape Town, South Africa
Sometimes referred to as the Mother City, Cape Town is the most famous port in South Africa and is influenced by many different cultures, including Dutch, British and Malay. The port was founded in 1652 by Dutch explorer Jan Van Riebeeck, and evidence of Dutch colonial rule remains throughout the region. The port is located on one of the world's most important trade routes, and is mainly a container port and handler of fresh fruit. Fishing is another vital industry, with large Asian fishing fleets using Cape Town as a logistical repair base for much of the year. The region is famous for its natural beauty, with the imposing Table Mountain and Lions Head, as well as the many nature reserves and botanical gardens such as Kirstenbosch which boasts an extensive range of indigenous plant life, including proteas and ferns. Cape Town's weather is mercurial, and can change from beautiful sunshine to dramatic thunderstorms within a short period. A local adage is that in Cape Town you can experience four seasons in one day.
River travel image
Day 2
River travel
Lüderitz, Namibia image
Day 3
Lüderitz, Namibia
The reopening of the diamond mine at Elizabeth Bay 20 years ago has brought the development of tourism and fishing back to this small 19th century village on the barren, windswept Namib Desert coast. One of Namibias oddities, it has everything you'd expect from a small German town - delicatessens, coffee shops and a Lutheran church. Here, the icy but clean South Atlantic is home to seals, penguins and other marine life and the desolate beaches support flamingoes. It was founded in 1883 when Heinrich Vogelsang purchased Angra Pequena and some of the surrounding land on behalf of Adolf Lüderitz, a Hanseat from Germany, from the local Nama chief. Lüderitz began its life as a trading post, with other activities in fishing and guano-harvesting. As a sign of Luderitz's revival, 1996 staged the first traditional German Karneval since 1960.
Walvis Bay, Namibia image
Day 4
Walvis Bay, Namibia
Once a whaling station, Walvis Bay provides a gateway to the extraordinary desert landscapes of Namibia and is itself an area of unusual natural beauty. The showpiece of the Walvis Bay area is the natural lagoon where you can see flamingos in their thousands at certain times of the year, along with a variety of other wading birds such as the white pelican. Further inland you will find the stunning Namib Desert, which provides an unlikely home for a diverse array of wildlife. Alternatively, you could venture into the desert of Sossusvlei, whose mountainous ochre sand dunes are said to be the highest in the world, or visit the colonial town of Swakopmund.
River travel image
Days 5 - 7
River travel
Principe, Sao Tome and Principe image
Day 8
Principe, Sao Tome and Principe
Located in the Gulf of Guinea on the west coast of Africa, Principe island is twinned with Sao Tome and home to beautiful scenery and a rich culture. Enjoy the beautiful walks in Obo Natural Park, dive into the depths off the coasts of the many beaches and take a boat trip to see the whales and dolphins surrounding the islands.
River travel image
Day 9
River travel
Lome, Togo image
Day 10
Lome, Togo
If you're sick of the usual beach resorts, then zesty Lomé will welcome you to a coastal destination that oozes with inimitable character. The former 'Jewel of West Africa' offers some wonderful beaches, and exports its delicious bounty of cocoa, coffee and pine kernels far and wide. A disorientating place, where stuttering engines and whizzing motorbikes add a chaotic essence to the city's streets, you’ll see vendors strolling with supplies balanced improbably on their heads, along with a healthy supply of intrigue, adventure and buzzing markets. Swarms of bikes and motorbikes dominate the coastal road, which borders the huge, palm tree lined Lomé beach – but the sand is wide enough for you to relax with the road merely a distant whisper. A treasure trove of traditional masks and statues wait for you to explore inside the National Museum, while the characterful Monument de l'Independance honours the country's sacrifices in its struggle for independence, and is a suitably defiant beacon of liberation.
Takoradi, Ghana image
Day 11
Takoradi, Ghana
Ghana's fourth-largest city plays serene beaches against a bustling commercial centre. People from around the world visit the shore, both for its beauty and to enjoy the fresh seafood served right on the sands. Frantic city life awaits a short distance inland, where an economy fuelled by Ghana’s oil industry is most apparent in the maze of vendors at Market Circle.
Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire image
Day 12
Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Three hours south of Yamoussoukro, nestled in between the canals and waterways, lies Abidjan the economic capital of the Ivory Coast. Considered the crossroads of West Africa both economically and culturally, Abidjan benefits from clement temperatures year round, reaching average highs of around 88˚ Fahrenheit, or 30˚ Celsius. Like much of West Africa, this city has cachet and soul, and enjoys a diversity of cultures, traditions and people, notably through the French influence, but also through the steady stream of tourists that make the city both vibrant and cosmopolitan. Although its reputation was tarnished during the civil war in 2011, Abidjan held firm and has blossomed into a stunning coastal city, ripe for exploration.
River travel image
Days 13 - 14
River travel
Banjul, Gambia image
Day 15
Banjul, Gambia
The tiny city of Banjul is the capital of The Gambia, a country that itself is little more than the banks of the mighty river that shares its name. Situated on St Mary’s Island, where the River Gambia joins the Atlantic, Bathurst, as Banjul was previously called, was established by the British in the early nineteenth century as a naval outpost dedicated to putting a halt to the trade in human beings. In 1943, Franklin Roosevelt visited Banjul on his way to the Casablanca conference with Churchill, becoming the first serving American president to visit Africa. Today, Banjul plays host to a thriving tourist trade, thanks to its pleasant climate, and is the political centre for the oldest democracy in Africa.
River travel image
Day 16
River travel
Mindelo, São Vicente Island, Cape Verde image
Day 17
Mindelo, São Vicente Island, Cape Verde
Your next stop will be Cape Verde’s cultural capital, Mindelo. Get along with the locals listening to the real morna in the bars of the old town and sipping the local drink, a sugarcane spirit. This island is also known by its British and Portuguese colonial architecture and pastel-coloured houses, the municipal market and the facades of the old Governor’s Palace.
River travel image
Days 18 - 19
River travel
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain image
Day 20
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
The largest of the Canary Islands, Tenerife is a beautiful and scenic island which enjoys year-round sunshine and is dominated by Mount Teide. The mountain range runs through the centre of the island, with fertile valleys on the northern side. In the central part of the range is the gigantic natural crater of the Cañadas del Teide, about 14 miles in diameter. Santa Cruz, the island’s pretty capital, was originally a small fishing village but has now grown into a modern city, and also contains 16th-century civic buildings and ornate private mansions. Near the pier is the Santa Cruz Palmetum, a Botanical Garden covering an area of 29 acres, specialising in palms.
River travel image
Day 21
River travel
Lisbon, Portugal image
Days 22 - 23
Lisbon, Portugal

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Insignia

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

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