12 nights onboard Ambience

British Isles Discovery

Discover the cultural treasures of Aberdeen, Scotland before continuing to Lerwick in the Shetland Islands and rounding to Tobermory on the Isle of Mull. Visit colourful Belfast, Liverpool, Cobh, and St. Mary's in the Isles of Scilly. Each port promises a unique blend of cultural exploration and scenic beauty where you can create lasting memories along picturesque coastlines.

CRUISE HIGHLIGHTS

Aberdeen
Discover the vibrant city of Aberdeen, Scotland, known for its historic architecture, picturesque coastline, and rich cultural heritage. Explore the stunning Aberdeen Maritime Museum, stroll along beautiful Aberdeen Beach, and indulge in traditional Scottish cuisine at local pubs and restaurants.

Lerwick, Shetland Isles
Lerwick, nestled in the Shetland Isles, whispers tales of Vikings and Scottish history. Take leisurely walks through its winding streets, learn the history of lighthouse-keeping at Bressay Lighthouse, and breathe in the salty North Atlantic breezes atop the Knab promontory.

Tobermory, Isle of Mull
Discover the picturesque charm of Tobermory, Isle of Mull, with its colourful waterfront and quaint charm. Explore historic sites like the iconic Tobermory Distillery, take scenic walks along the coast, and indulge in fresh seafood at local restaurants. Experience some quiet moments of wonder along Scotland's west coast.

Belfast
Belfast, Northern Ireland's capital, reveals a vibrant cityscape interwoven with history. From the old docklands of the Titanic Quarter to dynamic neighbourhoods filled with mural art, Belfast offers endless opportunities to explore.

Leaving from: Tilbury
Cruise ship: Ambience
Visiting: Tilbury Invergordon Kirkwall, Orkney Islands Stornoway, Isle of Lewis
Ambassador Cruise Line Logo
Ambassador Cruise Line

Ambassador Cruise Line describes itself as a "premium value" service, offering value-for-money breaks aimed primarily at the over-50s.

The company, based in Essex, first sailed out of Tilbury in 2022, with its first Ambassador ship - Ambience, now joined by Ambition. Guests can expect talks, a vast array of entertainment, and a healthy choice of restaurants.

The tag claims "best value at sea" - we'd be inclined to agree.

1400
Passengers
1991
Launched
2017
Last refit
70285t
Tonnage
245m
Length
32.2m
Width
17kts
Speed
11
Decks
GBP
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Tilbury, England
Day 3
Invergordon, Scotland
Day 4
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
Day 6
Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland
Day 7
Tobermory, Isle of Mull, Scotland
Day 8
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Day 9
Ringaskiddy, Ireland
Day 10
Saint Mary's, Isles of Scilly, England
Day 11
Plymouth, England
Day 12
Portsmouth, England
Day 13
Tilbury, England
Tilbury, England image
Day 1
Tilbury, England
Just 22 nautical miles down river from the Tower Bridge in London, Tilbury is a popular turnaround port for cruises visiting Baltic and Northern European destinations.
Invergordon, Scotland image
Day 3
Invergordon, Scotland
The port of Invergordon is your gateway to the Great Glen, an area of Scotland that includes Loch Ness and the city of Inverness. Inverness, the capital of the Highlands, has the flavor of a Lowland town, its winds blowing in a sea-salt air from the Moray Firth. The Great Glen is also home to one of the world's most famous monster myths: in 1933, during a quiet news week, the editor of a local paper decided to run a story about a strange sighting of something splashing about in Loch Ness. But there's more to look for here besides Nessie, including inland lochs, craggy and steep-sided mountains, rugged promontories, deep inlets, brilliant purple and emerald moorland, and forests filled with astonishingly varied wildlife, including mountain hares, red deer, golden eagles, and ospreys.
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland image
Day 4
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.
Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland image
Day 6
Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland
Tour description Stornoway, Scotland The Isle of Lewis and Harris is the northernmost and largest of the Outer Hebrides-the Western Isles in common parlance. The island's only major town, Stornoway, is on a nearly landlocked harbor on the east coast of Lewis. It's the port capital for the Outer Hebrides and the island's cultural center, such that it is. Stornoway has an increasing number of good restaurants. Lewis has some fine historic attractions, including the Calanais Standing Stones-a truly magical place. The Uists are known for their rare, plentiful wildlife. Stornoway. Besides being the island's main entry point for ferries, Stornoway is also Lewis's main arts center. You'll find some good restaurants in town if you want to have lunch off the ship. The town can be explored by bicycle if you are so inclined. Local rental shops can give you advice on where to ride, including a route to Tolsta that takes in five stunning beaches before reaching the edge of moorland. An Lanntair Arts Centre. The fabulous An Lanntair Arts Centre has exhibitions of contemporary and traditional art, as well as a cinema, a gift shop, and a restaurant serving international and Scottish fare. There are frequent traditional musical and theatrical events in the impressive auditorium. Kenneth St.. Black House. In the small community of Arnol, the Black House is a well-preserved example of an increasingly rare type of traditional Hebridean home. Once common throughout the islands-even into the 1950s-these dwellings were built without mortar and thatched on a timber framework without eaves. Other characteristic features include an open central peat hearth and the absence of a chimney-hence the soot and the designation black. On display inside are many of the house's original furnishings. To reach Arnol from Port of Ness, head south on the A857 and pick up the A858 at Barvas. Off A858, 21 mi southwest of Port of Ness. Admission charged. Calanais Standing Stones. These impressive stones are actually part of a cluster of several different archaeological sites in this area. Probably positioned in several stages between 3000 BC and 1500 BC, the grouping consists of an avenue of 19 monoliths extending northward from a circle of 13 stones, with other rows leading south, east, and west. Ruins of a cairn sit within the circle on the east side. Researchers believe they may have been used for astronomical observations, but you can create your own explanations. The visitor center has an exhibit on the stones, a gift shop, and a tearoom. On an unmarked road off A858. Admission charged. Dun Carloway. One of the best-preserved Iron Age brochs (circular stone towers) in Scotland, Dun Carloway dominates the scattered community of Carloway. The mysterious tower was probably built around 2,000 years ago as protection against seaborne raiders. The Dun Broch Centre explains more about the broch and its setting. Off A857. Gearrannan. Up a side road north from Carloway, Gearrannan is an old black-house village that has been brought back to life with a museum screening excellent short films on peat cutting and weaving. For a unique experience, groups can rent the restored houses. Leverburgh. At Leverburgh you can take the ferry to North Uist. Nearby Northton has several attractions; St. Clement's Church at Rodel is particularly worth a visit. MacGillivray Centre. Located in a round building overlooking the bay, the MacGillivray Centre gives insight into the life and work of William MacGillivray (1796-1852), a noted naturalist with strong links to Harris. MacGillivray authored the five-volume History of British Birds. This is a great location for a picnic (there are tables for just such a purpose). A walk to a ruined church starts at the parking lot. A859, Northton. Seallam! Visitor Centre and Co Leis Thu? Genealogical Research Centre. The center is where you can trace your Western Isles ancestry. Photographs and interpretive signs describe the history of Harris and its people. The owners organize guided walks and cultural evenings weekly between May and September. Off A859, Northton. Admission charged. St. Clement's Church. At the southernmost point of Harris is the community of Rodel, where you can find St. Clement's Church, a cruciform church standing on a hillock. This is the most impressive pre-Reformation church in the Outer Hebrides; it was built around 1500 and contains the magnificently sculptured tomb (1528) of the church's builder, Alasdair Crotach, MacLeod chief of Dunvegan Castle. Rodel is 3 mi south of Leverburgh and 21 mi south of Tarbert. A859, Rodel. Port of Ness. The stark, windswept community of Port of Ness, 30 mi north of Stornoway, cradles a small harbor squeezed in among the rocks. Butt of Lewis Lighthouse. At the northernmost point of Lewis stands the Butt of Lewis Lighthouse, designed by David and Thomas Stevenson (of the prominent engineering family whose best-known member was not an engineer at all, but the novelist Robert Louis Stevenson). The structure was first lighted in 1862. The adjacent cliffs provide a good vantage point for viewing seabirds, whales, and porpoises. The lighthouse is northwest of Port of Ness along the B8014. Shopping Harris tweed is available at many outlets on the islands, including some of the weavers' homes; keep an eye out for signs directing you to weavers' workshops. Harris Tweed Artisans Cooperative. The Harris Tweed Artisans Cooperative sells stylish and quirky hand-crafted tweed clothing, hats, accessories, all made by artists belonging to the cooperative. 40 Point St., Stornoway. Borgh Pottery. At Borgh Pottery, open from Monday to Saturday 9:30 to 6, you can buy attractive hand-thrown studio pottery made on the premises, including lamps, vases, mugs, and dishes. Fivepenny House, A857, Borve.
Tobermory, Isle of Mull, Scotland image
Day 7
Tobermory, Isle of Mull, Scotland
You'll always receive a welcome to remember, as the colourful cafes, houses and shops that line Tobermory's picturesque harbour salute your arrival. Located on the craggy Scottish Inner Hebrides, Tobermory serves as the capital of the Isle of Mull. There's a high chance you'll recognise the town’s colourfully-daubed buildings, as their charming exteriors have featured in countless TV shows - most notably in the children’s favourite, Balamory. There's always a new story to discover here – not least the legend that suggests there's a sunken Spanish galleon, brimming with lost gold, sitting just below the waves that roll around the harbour. Learn a little more of the area’s history at the Mull Museum, or head out to enjoy some of the fabulous wildlife watching opportunities on offer on a boat tour. You can spot majestic birds like white tail and golden eagles circling in the skies, or turn your attention to the waves, where friendly dolphins and Minke whales are regular visitors. Treat yourself to a sample of one of the island's finest exports before leaving, as you drop in at the Tobermory Distillery for some whiskey tasting. Established in 1798, it’s one of Scotland's oldest distilleries.
Belfast, Northern Ireland image
Day 8
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.
Ringaskiddy, Ireland image
Day 9
Ringaskiddy, Ireland
Saint Mary's, Isles of Scilly, England image
Day 10
Saint Mary's, Isles of Scilly, England
St Mary’s is the Isle of Scilly’s largest island with a population of 1800 residents and an area of 6.58 square Kilometres; this is the gateway to the rest of the magnificent islands. Hugh town -a beautiful Old town with its own beach, nature reserve and church is the main attractions of St Mary’s, with tiny streets brimming with shops to pick up the perfect souvenir. St Mary’s is a hidden gem, with long stretches of white sandy beaches and a breath-taking untouched landscape. The coastline holds many archaeological sites along with miles of splendid walks along the coastal and country paths.
Plymouth, England image
Day 11
Plymouth, England
Best known as the port from which Sir Francis Drake and the port which the Pilgrim Fathers set sail from, Plymouth is awash with history. Walk down its cobbled streets, step back in time and discover the historical landmarks and sites.
Portsmouth, England image
Day 12
Portsmouth, England

Portsmouth, or ‘Pompey’ as the locals lovingly refer to it, has many claims to fame, having been the birthplace of the great Charles Dickens and a historic dockyard. The UK’s only island city is home to a host of attractions and landmarks showcasing its rich maritime and literary heritage, all of which can be explored during your cruise stopover.

Tilbury, England image
Day 13
Tilbury, England
Just 22 nautical miles down river from the Tower Bridge in London, Tilbury is a popular turnaround port for cruises visiting Baltic and Northern European destinations.
Ship Details
Ambassador Cruise Line
Ambience

Here she is, our flagship of the fleet, our first lady of the sea: Ambience. Derived from the French word for ‘surrounding’, our ambition at Ambassador is to create the optimum atmosphere onboard; one that brings out the best in each of us. The perfect ambience.

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