19 nights onboard Vista

Caribbean Twilight

Imaginative New Dining Concepts

Vista is your world from a new perspective and honours our passion for serving The Finest Cuisine at Sea® with imaginative new dining concepts and the debut of new epicurean delights.

Leaving from: Miami, Florida
Cruise ship: Vista
Visiting: Miami, Florida Costa Maya Belize City Roatán Island
Oceania Cruises Logo
Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

1200
Passengers
800
Crew
2023
Launched
67000t
Tonnage
241m
Length
32m
Width
20kts
Speed
11
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Day 2
River travel
Day 3
Costa Maya, Mexico
Day 4
Belize City, Belize
Day 5
Roatán Island, Honduras
Day 6
Cozumel, Mexico
Day 7
River travel
Day 8
Miami, Florida, United States
Days 9 - 10
River travel
Day 11
Oranjestad, Aruba
Day 12
Willemstad, Curaçao
Day 13
Kralendijk, Bonaire
Day 14
Saint George's, Grenada
Day 15
Castries, Saint Lucia
Day 16
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Day 17
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico
Day 18
River travel
Day 19
Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas
Day 20
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
River travel image
Day 2
River travel
Costa Maya, Mexico image
Day 3
Costa Maya, Mexico
Laid-back coast with sandy beaches & waterfront eateries, plus diving around offshore coral reefs.
Belize City, Belize image
Day 4
Belize City, Belize
Belize City, a coastal gem, seamlessly blends history and modern vibrancy. Colonial architecture graces lively streets, narrating tales of Mayan roots and cultural richness. A welcoming atmosphere emanates from friendly locals, and diverse festivals celebrate Belize's heritage. The city serves as a gateway to natural wonders, from serene river rides to the renowned Belize Barrier Reef. Pristine beaches like Old Belize Beach invite relaxation. Culinary delights abound, showcasing Belizean flavours. In this enchanting city, every smile, historical landmark, and cultural celebration embodies the warmth and charm that make Belize City an unforgettable destination.
Roatán Island, Honduras image
Day 5
Roatán Island, Honduras
Experience true Caribbean island bliss, during your time on the immaculate paradise of Roatan, which is the largest of the Bay Islands. This slim island is framed by glorious powdery white beaches, and rich ocean beds carpeted with diverse coral reefs - alive with fish and marine life. Curious dolphins roll through the waves just offshore, while beach dwellers soak up the sun, and enjoy coconut cocktails, beside leaning palm trees. The beaches here are nothing short of dreamy - with wooden piers teetering out over the water, and thatched roofs providing welcome shade, as you dangle your legs towards the water.
Cozumel, Mexico image
Day 6
Cozumel, Mexico

Cozumel is the largest island in Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula and a microcosm of the very best that the Mayan Riviera has to offer: think sugar white beaches, a jungle rich with Mayan ruins and some of the world’s most impressive diving sites teeming with technicolour fish. This once sleepy island has come a long way from its humble fishing roots but remains far less commercialised than neighbouring Playa del Carmen in Cancun, just across the bay. Removed from the raucous pace of the mainland by around 20km of Caribbean Sea, a cruise to Cozumel offers a peaceful respite and a leisurely chance to relax into the rhythm of the tropics.

River travel image
Day 7
River travel
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 8
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
River travel image
Days 9 - 10
River travel
Oranjestad, Aruba image
Day 11
Oranjestad, Aruba
Aruba's capital is easily explored on foot. Its palm-lined central thoroughfare runs between old and new pastel-painted buildings of typical Dutch design (Spanish influence is also evident in some of the architecture). There are a lot of malls with boutiques and shops—the Renaissance mall carries high-end luxury items and designer fashions. A massive renovation in downtown has given Main Street (a.k.a. Caya G. F. Betico Croes) behind the Renaissance Resort a whole new lease on life: boutique malls, shops, and restaurants have opened next to well-loved family-run businesses. The pedestrian-only walkway and resting areas have unclogged the street, and the new eco-trolley is free and a great way to get around. At this writing, Linear Park was well and will showcase local merchants and artists. There will be activities along a boardwalk that will eventually run all the way to the end of Palm Beach, making it the longest of its kind in the Caribbean.
Willemstad, Curaçao image
Day 12
Willemstad, Curaçao
Dutch settlers came here in the 1630s, about the same time they sailed through the Verazzano Narrows to Manhattan, bringing with them original red-tile roofs, first used on the trade ships as ballast and later incorporated into the architecture of Willemstad. Much of the original colonial structures remain, but this historic city is constantly reinventing itself and the government monument foundation is always busy restoring buildings in one urban neighborhood or another. The salty air causes what is called "wall cancer" which causes the ancient abodes to continually crumble over time. The city is cut in two by Santa Anna Bay. On one side is Punda (the point)—crammed with shops, restaurants, monuments, and markets and a new museum retracing its colorful history. And on the other side is Otrobanda (literally meaning the "other side"), with lots of narrow, winding streets and alleyways (called "steekjes" in Dutch), full of private homes notable for their picturesque gables and Dutch-influenced designs. In recent years the ongoing regeneration of Otrobanda has been apparent, marked by a surge in development of new hotels, restaurants, and shops; the rebirth, concentrated near the waterfront, was spearheaded by the creation of the elaborate Kura Hulanda complex.There are three ways to cross the bay: by car over the Juliana Bridge; by foot over the Queen Emma pontoon bridge (locally called "The Swinging Old Lady"); or by free ferry, which runs when the pontoon bridge is swung open for passing ships. All the major hotels outside town offer free shuttle service to town once or twice daily. Shuttles coming from the Otrobanda side leave you at Riffort. From here it's a short walk north to the foot of the pontoon bridge. Shuttles coming from the Punda side leave you near the main entrance to Ft. Amsterdam.
Kralendijk, Bonaire image
Day 13
Kralendijk, Bonaire
Saint George's, Grenada image
Day 14
Saint George's, Grenada
Nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, cocoa those heady aromas fill the air in Grenada (pronounced gruh-nay-da). Only 21 miles (33½ km) long and 12 miles (19½ km) wide, the Isle of Spice is a tropical gem of lush rain forests, white-sand beaches, secluded coves, exotic flowers, and enough locally grown spices to fill anyone's kitchen cabinet. St. George's is one of the most picturesque capital cities in the Caribbean, St. George's Harbour is one of the most picturesque harbors, and Grenada's Grand Anse Beach is one of the region's finest beaches. The island has friendly, hospitable people and enough good shopping, restaurants, historic sites, and natural wonders to make it a popular port of call. About one-third of Grenada's visitors arrive by cruise ship, and that number continues to grow each year. Grenada's capital is a bustling West Indian city, much of which remains unchanged from colonial days. Narrow streets lined with shops wind up, down, and across steep hills. Brick warehouses cling to the waterfront, and pastel-painted homes rise from the waterfront and disappear into steep green hills. The horseshoe-shaped St. George's Harbour, a submerged volcanic crater, is arguably the prettiest harbor in the Caribbean. Schooners, ferries, and tour boats tie up along the seawall or at the small dinghy dock. The Carenage (pronounced car-a-nahzh), which surrounds the harbor, is the capital's center. Warehouses, shops, and restaurants line the waterfront. The Christ of the Deep statue that sits on the pedestrian plaza at the center of The Carenage was presented to Grenada by Costa Cruise Line in remembrance of its ship, Bianca C, which burned and sank in the harbor in 1961 and is now a favorite dive site. An engineering feat for its time, the 340-foot-long Sendall Tunnel was built in 1895 and named for Walter Sendall, an early governor. The narrow tunnel, used by both pedestrians and vehicles, separates the harbor side of St. George's from the Esplanade on the bay side of town, where you can find the markets (produce, meat, and fish), the Cruise Ship Terminal, the Esplanade Mall, and the public bus station.
Castries, Saint Lucia image
Day 15
Castries, Saint Lucia
The typical image of a lush tropical paradise comes to life on the friendly island of St Lucia. Despite its small size – just 27 miles long and 14 miles wide – St Lucia is rich in natural splendour with dense emerald rainforest, banana plantations and orchards of coconut, mango and papaya trees. The twin peaks of Les Pitons, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site rise dramatically 2,000 feet into the sky and dominate the island. Look out for unusual birds with brilliant plumage such as the St Lucia parrot, see a surprising diversity of exotic flora and enjoy the warm hospitality of the islanders in the small villages and open-air markets. Please be aware that St Lucia is a small, mountainous island, with steep, winding and bumpy roads. Customers with back and neck problems should take this into consideration when booking an excursion.
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis image
Day 16
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Mountainous St. Kitts, the first English settlement in the Leeward Islands, crams some stunning scenery into its 65 square miles (168 square km). Vast, brilliant green fields of sugarcane (the former cash crop, now slowly being replanted) run to the shore. The fertile, lush island has some fascinating natural and historical attractions: a rain forest replete with waterfalls, thick vines, and secret trails; a central mountain range dominated by the 3,792-foot Mt. Liamuiga, whose crater has long been dormant; and Brimstone Hill, known in the 18th century as the Gibraltar of the West Indies. St. Kitts and Nevis, along with Anguilla, achieved self-government as an associated state of Great Britain in 1967. In 1983 St. Kitts and Nevis became an independent nation. English with a strong West Indian lilt is spoken here. People are friendly but shy; always ask before you take photographs. Also, be sure to wear wraps or shorts over beach attire when you're in public places.
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico image
Day 17
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico
If you associate Puerto Rico's capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island's nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de León had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location. In 1521, after he became the first colonial governor, Ponce de León switched the name of the island—which was then called San Juan Bautista in honor of St. John the Baptist—with that of the settlement of Puerto Rico ("rich port").Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico's administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain's hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area now known as Old San Juan. The area is filled with cobblestone streets and brightly painted, colonial-era structures, and its fortifications have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Old San Juan is a monument to the past, but most of the rest of the city is planted firmly in the 21st century and draws migrants island-wide and from farther afield to jobs in its businesses and industries. The city captivates residents and visitors alike with its vibrant lifestyle as well as its balmy beaches, pulsing nightclubs, globe-spanning restaurants, and world-class museums. Once you set foot in this city, you may never want to leave.
River travel image
Day 18
River travel
Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas image
Day 19
Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas
Located 50 miles from Nassau, Great Stirrup Cay is a 250-acre island owned by Norwegian Cruise Line. A range of activities are on offer, including water sports, ping-pong, beach volleyball and a water slide. For lunch, the Jumbey Beach Grill offers barbecues on the beach. Afterwards, head to the Berried Treasure Bazaar to find a little something to bring back home.
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 20
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Vista

Imaginative New Dining Concepts

Vista is your world from a new perspective and honours our passion for serving The Finest Cuisine at Sea® with imaginative new dining concepts and the debut of new epicurean delights.

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