10 nights onboard Insignia

Cradle Of Vikings

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

Leaving from: Reykjavík
Cruise ship: Insignia
Visiting: Reykjavík Isafjørdur Runavík Lerwick, Shetland Islands
Oceania Cruises Logo
Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

656
Passengers
400
Crew
1999
Launched
2018
Last refit
30277t
Tonnage
180m
Length
25.5m
Width
18kts
Speed
9
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Day 2
Isafjørdur, Iceland
Day 3
River travel
Day 4
Runavík, Faroe Islands
Day 5
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Day 6
Stavanger, Norway
Day 7
Kristiansand, Norway
Day 8
Oslo, Norway
Day 9
Gothenburg, Sweden
Days 10 - 11
Copenhagen, Denmark
Reykjavík, Iceland image
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.
Isafjørdur, Iceland image
Day 2
Isafjørdur, Iceland
Two colossal terraces of sheer rock stand either side of this extraordinarily located town - which rides a jutting spit onto an immensity of black fjord water. Surprisingly, considering the remoteness of its location and its compact size, Isafjordur is a modern and lively place to visit, offering a great choice of cafes and delicious restaurants – which are well stocked to impress visitors. The town is a perfectly located base for adventures amongst Iceland's fantastic wilderness - with skiing, hiking and water-sports popular pursuits among visitors.
River travel image
Day 3
River travel
Runavík, Faroe Islands image
Day 4
Runavík, Faroe Islands
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland image
Day 5
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Founded by Dutch fishermen in the 17th century, Lerwick today is a busy town and administrative center. Handsome stone buildings—known as lodberries—line the harbor; they provided loading bays for goods, some of them illegal. The town's twisting flagstone lanes and harbor once heaved with activity, and Lerwick is still an active port today. This is also where most visitors to Shetland dock, spilling out of cruise ships, allowing passengers to walk around the town.
Stavanger, Norway image
Day 6
Stavanger, Norway
Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Stavanger flourished in the 19th century as a fishing port. While other towns in Norway have suffered with the decline of this industry, Stavanger has kept its economy booming by diversifying, first into shipbuilding and now into oil. These two contrasting industries have created a city of two halves – a modern area of high-rise buildings and a historic centre with cobbled streets and old wooden houses. The city centre was the birthplace of Alexander Kielland, one of the great 19th-century Norwegian novelists. Stavanger Cathedral, dating from 1125, is an impressive building and the only medieval cathedral in Norway that has not been substantially altered since it was first built. From Stavanger you can explore the attractive blue waters of Lysefjord, surrounded by cliffs and striking rock formations, and also visit Hafrsfjord where the Viking King Harald won an important battle that started the Unification of Norway. Those preferring to explore on their own may wish to visit the interesting Petroleum Museum.
Kristiansand, Norway image
Day 7
Kristiansand, Norway
Nicknamed "Sommerbyen" ("Summer City"), Norway's fifth-largest city has 78,000 inhabitants. Norwegians come here for its sun-soaked beaches and beautiful harbor. Kristiansand has also become known internationally for the outdoor Quart Festival, which hosts local and international rock bands every July. According to legend, in 1641 King Christian IV marked the four corners of Kristiansand with his walking stick, and within that framework the grid of wide streets was laid down. The center of town, called the Kvadraturen, still retains the grid, even after numerous fires. In the northeast corner is Posebyen, one of northern Europe's largest collections of low, connected wooden house settlements, and there's a market here every Saturday in summer. Kristiansand's Fisketorvet (fish market) is near the south corner of the town's grid, right on the sea.
Oslo, Norway image
Day 8
Oslo, Norway
Oslo is the capital of Norway and is also its largest city, situated at the head of Oslo Fjord and surrounded by hills and forests. Home to some 50 museums and full of galleries, cafés, a sculpture park and the Royal Palace, this vibrant city with its handsome 19th-century buildings and wide streets has much to offer. Its history dates back 1,000 years, and includes a rich seafaring heritage that ranges from the Viking era to Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon Tiki expedition. Discover more about this exciting city on our varied selection of excursions.
Gothenburg, Sweden image
Day 9
Gothenburg, Sweden

Sweden’s second city has much to recommend it. The lively, major seaport is dotted with Dutch-style canals and lined with leafy boulevards, shops and cafés. Cruise passengers stopping over in Gothenburg will also find a plethora of museums and cultural attractions. Ranked as the 12th most incentive city by Forbes, the city is home to design academy Volvo and the Gothenburg International Film Festival.

Copenhagen, Denmark image
Days 10 - 11
Copenhagen, Denmark

By the 11th century, Copenhagen was already an important trading and fishing centre and today you will find an attractive city which, although the largest in Scandinavia, has managed to retain its low-level skyline. Discover some of the famous attractions including Gefion Fountain and Amalienborg Palace, perhaps cruise the city’s waterways, visit Rosenborg Castle or explore the medieval fishing village of Dragoer. Once the home of Hans Christian Andersen, Copenhagen features many reminders of its fairytale heritage and lives up to the reputation immortalised in the famous song ‘Wonderful Copenhagen’.

Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Insignia

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

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