17 nights onboard Emerald Sakara

Discover Western Mediterranean & Morocco

Explore the many sides of Spain’s fascinating personality, from nature to naval history, intertwined with an awe-inspiring stop in Morocco, where Casablanca’s architecture harks back to its French colonial legacy. The inimitable towns of coastal Italy will cast a romantic spell on you, as sandy beaches, lively harbours and emerald waters live long in the memory.
Leaving from: Santa Cruz de Tenerife
Cruise ship: Emerald Sakara
Visiting: Santa Cruz de Tenerife Arrecife, Lanzarote Casablanca Gibraltar
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Emerald Cruises

Emerald Cruises offers a modern, relaxed, super-premium all-inclusive cruising experience, with contemporary and elegant ships and bucket-list destinations.

Onboard, guests are able to dine at four all-inclusive and unique outlets, enjoying free-flowing alcoholic beverages at mealtimes. Flexibility is key, with its range of shore excursion packages, and every aspect of the trip is taken care of – including flights and transfers.

100
Passengers
64
Crew
2023
Launched
110m
Length
6
Decks
EUR
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
Embark
Day 2
Arrecife, Lanzarote, Spain
Day 4
Casablanca, Morocco
Day 5
Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Day 6
Málaga, Spain
Day 7
Cartagena, Spain
Day 8
Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Day 9
Mahón, Menorca, Spain
Day 10
Bonifacio, Corsica, France
Day 11
Civitavecchia, Italy
Day 12
Sorrento, Italy
Day 13
Amalfi, Italy
Day 14
Gaeta, Italy
Day 15
Porto Cervo, Italy
Day 16
Bonifacio, Corsica, France
Day 17
Porto Santo Stefano, Italy
Day 18
Civitavecchia, Italy
Disembark
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain image
Day 1
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
The largest of the Canary Islands, Tenerife is a beautiful and scenic island which enjoys year-round sunshine and is dominated by Mount Teide. The mountain range runs through the centre of the island, with fertile valleys on the northern side. In the central part of the range is the gigantic natural crater of the Cañadas del Teide, about 14 miles in diameter. Santa Cruz, the island’s pretty capital, was originally a small fishing village but has now grown into a modern city, and also contains 16th-century civic buildings and ornate private mansions. Near the pier is the Santa Cruz Palmetum, a Botanical Garden covering an area of 29 acres, specialising in palms.
Arrecife, Lanzarote, Spain image
Day 2
Arrecife, Lanzarote, Spain
A volcanic island designated a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, Lanzarote’s dramatic landscapes were shaped by an explosive past. Today, its pretty beaches and virtual absence of rain together with duty-free shopping make the island an extremely desirable destination. The main port and capital, Arrecife, is a pleasant town with a modern seafront and colourful gardens. Outside the capital there is plenty to explore, from the dazzling white salt flats of Janubio and the rugged terrain of Fire Mountain to the eerie caves of Los Verdes and an array of unspoilt fishing villages scattered around the coast. The island is home to a great selection of restaurants and local specialities including garbanzos compuestos – a chickpea stew; papas arrugadas – potatoes with carrots, peas, ham and green pepper; and of course, plenty of fresh seafood. Please note that those planning to participate in one of the shore excursions from this port may need to take an early lunch on board ship to suit the excursion schedules.
Casablanca, Morocco image
Day 4
Casablanca, Morocco

Many of you might will have a picture of Casablanca in your head, that has no doubt been taken from the classic Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman 1942 film – all gin joints, Moroccan souks and old stone medina alleys. But of course, time has gone by and the Casablanca of today may still have an old-world, romantic charm, but it has moved with the times and is now a thriving commercial capital, packed full of cultural attractions, contemporary galleries and top-notch restaurants just waiting to be discovered. The multifaceted port city, which fronts the Atlantic Ocean in western Morocco, combines its French colonial heritage with traditional Arab culture and European Art Deco and modernist architecture.

Gibraltar, Gibraltar image
Day 5
Gibraltar, Gibraltar

Tagged on to the end of Iberia, the intriguing British outpost of Gibraltar is dominated by a sandy peninsula and the stunning 1,400-feet-high limestone Rock. Although small, Gibraltar has always been seen as having great strategic importance on account of its advantageous position where the Atlantic meets the Mediterranean, just 12 miles from the coast of Africa. Ever popular with British holidaymakers, Gibraltar is very much a home from home, boasting excellent duty-free shopping in many familiar British high street shops. Please note: Gibraltar’s small size and narrow winding roads mean that excursions are operated by 22-seater mini-buses, accompanied by a driver/guide. Local health and safety regulations prohibit the carriage of walking aids and collapsible wheelchairs on these vehicles. If you do wish to bring a mobility aid, we can arrange the Rock Tour by taxi, which has extra space. If this suits your requirements, please advise the Tours and Travel office when you join the ship, as numbers are limited.

Málaga, Spain image
Day 6
Málaga, Spain
As you sail into Malaga you will notice what an idyllic setting the city enjoys on the famous Costa del Sol. To the east of this provincial capital, the coast along the region of La Axarqua is scattered with villages, farmland and sleepy fishing hamlets - the epitome of traditional rural Spain. To the west stretches a continuous city where the razzmatazz and bustle creates a colourful contrast that is easily recognisable as the Costa del Sol. Surrounding the region, the Penibéetica Mountains provide an attractive backdrop overlooking the lower terraced slopes which yield olives and almonds. This spectacular mountain chain shelters the province from cold northerly winds, giving it a reputation as a therapeutic and exotic place in which to escape from cold northern climes. Malaga is also the gateway to many of Andalusia's enchanting historic villages, towns and cities.
Cartagena, Spain image
Day 7
Cartagena, Spain
A Mediterranean city and naval station located in the Region of Murcia, southeastern Spain, Cartagena’s sheltered bay has attracted sailors for centuries. The Carthaginians founded the city in 223BC and named it Cartago Nova; it later became a prosperous Roman colony, and a Byzantine trading centre. The city has been the main Spanish Mediterranean naval base since the reign of King Philip II, and is still surrounded by walls built during this period. Cartagena’s importance grew with the arrival of the Spanish Bourbons in the 18th century, when the Navidad Fortress was constructed to protect the harbour. In recent years, traces of the city’s fascinating past have been brought to light: a well-preserved Roman Theatre was discovered in 1988, and this has now been restored and opened to the public. During your free time, you may like to take a mini-cruise around Cartagena's historic harbour: these operate several times a day, take approximately 40 minutes and do not need to be booked in advance. Full details will be available at the port.
Palma de Mallorca, Spain image
Day 8
Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Palma de Mallorca, the largest city on the island of Mallorca, is the capital of Spain’s Balearic Islands and a popular destination among Mediterranean cruisers. The sun-kissed island combines a vibrant city centre and shopping areas with a charming old town, known in Spanish as El Casco Antiguo, where many tourist hotspots can be found. With stunning views allied to great beaches, Gothic, Moorish and Renaissance architecture, as well as tasty regional food, Palma ticks all the boxes.

Mahón, Menorca, Spain image
Day 9
Mahón, Menorca, Spain
The capital of Menorca since 1721, Mahon has a impressive natural deep water harbour, which is one of the largest in the world. This, coupled with its strategic location, has made it a stronghold for many nations throughout history. Mahon has an abundance of historical buildings, the oldest being the Arch of Saint Roc which is all that remains of the wall that once encircled the whole town. The island was occupied by the British during the 18th century and Lord Nelson is thought to have stayed there. Indeed, San Antoni Mansion, located on the north side of the harbour, houses a collection of Nelson memorabilia. The legacy of colonial rule can be seen in the muted Georgian style of some of the buildings, but Mahon still boasts attractive examples of neo-Classical, Baroque and Romanesque architecture. With narrow streets to explore, pleasant shaded squares and welcoming pavement cafés, there is something for everyone to enjoy. Please be aware that most shops in town close for a siesta between 1330 and 1730.
Bonifacio, Corsica, France image
Day 10
Bonifacio, Corsica, France
Located in the South of Corsica, Bonifacio is one of the island’s most beautiful destinations. From its breathtaking views and sandy white islands to its historic citadel, the city is a must visit for anyone travelling to the island.
Civitavecchia, Italy image
Day 11
Civitavecchia, Italy

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here.

Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Sorrento, Italy image
Day 12
Sorrento, Italy
Sorrento may have become a jumping-off point for visitors to Pompeii, Capri, and Amalfi, but you can find countless reasons to love it for itself. The Sorrentine people are fair-minded and hardworking, bubbling with life and warmth. The tuff cliff on which the town rests is spread over the bay, absorbing sunlight, while orange and lemon trees waft their perfume in spring. Winding along a cliff above a small beach and two harbors, the town is split in two by a narrow ravine formed by a former mountain stream. To the east, dozens of hotels line busy Via Correale along the cliff—many have "grand" included in their names, and some indeed still are. To the west, however, is the historic sector, which still enchants. It's a relatively flat area, with winding, stone-paved lanes bordered by balconied buildings, some joined by medieval stone arches. The central piazza is named after the poet Torquato Tasso, born here in 1544. This part of town is a delightful place to walk through. Craftspeople are often at work in their stalls and shops and are happy to let you watch; in fact, that's the point. Music spots and bars cluster in the side streets near Piazza Tasso.
Amalfi, Italy image
Day 13
Amalfi, Italy
At first glance, it's hard to imagine that this resort destination was one of the world's great naval powers, and a sturdy rival of Genoa and Pisa for control of the Mediterranean in the 11th and 12th centuries. Once the seat of the Amalfi Maritime Republic, the town is set in a verdant valley of the Lattari Mountains, with cream-colored and pastel-hued buildings tightly packing a gorge on the Bay of Salerno. The harbor, which once launched the greatest fleet in Italy, now bobs with ferries and blue-and-white fishing boats. The main street, lined with shops and pasticcerie, has replaced a raging mountain torrent, and terraced hills flaunt the green and gold of lemon groves. Bearing testimony to its great trade with Tunis, Tripoli, and Algiers, Amalfi remains honeycombed with Arab-Sicilian cloisters and covered passages. In a way Amalfi has become great again, showing off its medieval glory days with sea pageants, convents-turned-hotels, ancient paper mills, covered streets, and its glimmering cathedral.
Gaeta, Italy image
Day 14
Gaeta, Italy
Porto Cervo, Italy image
Day 15
Porto Cervo, Italy
Bonifacio, Corsica, France image
Day 16
Bonifacio, Corsica, France
Located in the South of Corsica, Bonifacio is one of the island’s most beautiful destinations. From its breathtaking views and sandy white islands to its historic citadel, the city is a must visit for anyone travelling to the island.
Porto Santo Stefano, Italy image
Day 17
Porto Santo Stefano, Italy
Civitavecchia, Italy image
Day 18
Civitavecchia, Italy

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here.

Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

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Emerald Cruises
Emerald Sakara

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