9 nights onboard Borealis

Discovering the World's Idyllic Islands & Iconic Cities

Winners 2022 Favourite Ocean Cruise Line

Thanks to her ability to cruise at higher speeds than other ships, Borealis – sister ship of our flagship Bolette – is perfectly suited for sailing our longer voyages across the globe. Cruising faster means she can include more stops, scenic discoveries and highlights into each itinerary.

Leaving from: Southampton
Cruise ship: Borealis
Visiting: Southampton Gibraltar Valletta Dubrovnik
Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines Logo
Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines

Fred Olsen Cruises combine quality cruise experiences with customer-friendly value. They’ve plied the waves for 175 years, and are still going as strong today as their first day at sea.

Offering a stylish & understated style of traditional cruising, the line prides itself on its Signature Experience programme- helping passengers to gain an in-depth understanding of their destinations.

Ideal for passengers seeking a laid-back cruise, with an informal and friendly atmosphere aboard.

1360
Passengers
662
Crew
1997
Launched
2015
Last refit
61849t
Tonnage
238m
Length
34m
Width
22kts
Speed
10
Decks
GBP
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Southampton, England
Departure time: Late PM
Day 5
Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Arrival time: Early AM; Departure time: Early PM
Day 5
River travel
Arrival time: Late PM; Departure time: Late PM
Day 8
Valletta, Malta
Arrival time: Early AM; Departure time: Late PM
Day 10
Dubrovnik, Croatia
Arrival time: Early AM
Southampton, England image
Day 1
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Gibraltar, Gibraltar image
Day 5
Gibraltar, Gibraltar

Tagged on to the end of Iberia, the intriguing British outpost of Gibraltar is dominated by a sandy peninsula and the stunning 1,400-feet-high limestone Rock. Although small, Gibraltar has always been seen as having great strategic importance on account of its advantageous position where the Atlantic meets the Mediterranean, just 12 miles from the coast of Africa. Ever popular with British holidaymakers, Gibraltar is very much a home from home, boasting excellent duty-free shopping in many familiar British high street shops. Please note: Gibraltar’s small size and narrow winding roads mean that excursions are operated by 22-seater mini-buses, accompanied by a driver/guide. Local health and safety regulations prohibit the carriage of walking aids and collapsible wheelchairs on these vehicles. If you do wish to bring a mobility aid, we can arrange the Rock Tour by taxi, which has extra space. If this suits your requirements, please advise the Tours and Travel office when you join the ship, as numbers are limited.

River travel image
Day 5
River travel
Arrival time: Late PM; Departure time: Late PM
Valletta, Malta image
Day 8
Valletta, Malta

Malta: the country that God built. Well, kind of. Malta is well-known for being the once-stronghold of the famous religious military order, The Knights Hospitaller, who were granted the land in 1530 from the King of Spain in exchange for an annual fee of one Maltese falcon (which eventually inspired the name of Dashiell Hammett’s famous novel). And these marauding knights certainly did a great job putting the place together. Valletta, the nation’s capital, remains the highlight and exploring this fascinating walled city (which kept the Hospitallers secure until they came across Napoleon in 1798) is akin to walking back in time. It’s small size (just 0.3 square miles) makes it the perfect cruise stopover and is the ideal base for exploring the rest of the country on excursions.

Dubrovnik, Croatia image
Day 10
Dubrovnik, Croatia

Nothing can prepare you for your first sight of Dubrovnik. Lying 216 km (135 miles) southeast of Split and commanding a jaw-dropping coastal location, it is one of the world's most beautiful fortified cities. Its massive stone ramparts and fortress towers curve around a tiny harbor, enclosing graduated ridges of sun-bleached orange-tiled roofs, copper domes, and elegant bell towers. Your imagination will run wild picturing what it looked like seven centuries ago when the walls were built, without any suburbs or highways around it, just this magnificent stone city rising out of the sea.In the 7th century AD, residents of the Roman city Epidaurum (now Cavtat) fled the Avars and Slavs of the north and founded a new settlement on a small rocky island, which they named Laus, and later Ragusa. On the mainland hillside opposite the island, the Slav settlement called Dubrovnik grew up. In the 12th century the narrow channel separating the two settlements was filled in (now the main street through the Old Town, called Stradun), and Ragusa and Dubrovnik became one. The city was surrounded by defensive walls during the 13th century, and these were reinforced with towers and bastions in the late 15th century.From 1358 to 1808 the city thrived as a powerful and remarkably sophisticated independent republic, reaching its golden age during the 16th century. In 1667 many of its splendid Gothic and Renaissance buildings were destroyed by an earthquake. The defensive walls survived the disaster, and the city was rebuilt in baroque style.Dubrovnik lost its independence to Napoléon in 1808, and in 1815 passed to Austria-Hungary. During the 20th century, as part of Yugoslavia, the city became a popular tourist destination, and in 1979 it was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. During the war for independence, it came under heavy siege. Thanks to careful restoration, few traces of damage remain; however, there are maps inside the Pile and Ploče Gates illustrating the points around the city where damage was done. It’s only when you experience Dubrovnik yourself that you can understand what a treasure the world nearly lost

Ship Details
Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines
Borealis

Thanks to her ability to cruise at higher speeds than other ships, Borealis – sister ship of our flagship Bolette – is perfectly suited for sailing our longer voyages across the globe. Cruising faster means she can include more stops, scenic discoveries and highlights into each itinerary.

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