35 nights onboard Sirena

Epic Northern Europe

The better-than-new Sirena blends sophistication with a contemporary flair to create a casually elegant ambiance that embodies the most treasured elements of our celebrated ships. Every surface of every suite and stateroom is entirely new, while in the public spaces, a refreshed colour palette of soft sea and sky tones surrounds a tasteful renewal of fabrics, furnishings and lighting fixtures that exquisitely encompasses the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises.

Leaving from: Dublin
Cruise ship: Sirena
Visiting: Dublin Belfast Ullapool Lerwick, Shetland Islands
Oceania Cruises Logo
Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

648
Passengers
400
Crew
1999
Launched
2019
Last refit
30277t
Tonnage
181m
Length
25.45m
Width
18kts
Speed
9
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Dublin, Ireland
Day 2
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Day 3
Ullapool, Scotland
Day 4
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Day 5
Haugesund, Norway
Day 6
Nordfjordeid, Norway
Day 7
Trondheim, Norway
Day 8
Ålesund, Norway
Day 9
River travel
Day 10
Oslo, Norway
Day 11
Helsingborg, Sweden
Day 12
Copenhagen, Denmark
Days 13 - 14
Warnemünde, Germany
Day 15
Karlskrona, Sweden
Day 16
Visby, Sweden
Day 17
Maarianhamina (Mariehamn), Finland
Day 18
Vaasa (Vasa), Finland
Days 19 - 20
Kemi, Finland
Day 21
Luleå, Sweden
Day 22
Sundsvall, Sweden
Days 23 - 24
Stockholm, Sweden
Days 25 - 26
Helsinki, Finland
Day 27
Kotka, Finland
Day 28
Tallinn, Estonia
Day 29
Saaremaa sadam, Estonia
Day 30
Riga, Latvia
Days 31 - 32
Gdansk, Poland
Day 33
Rønne, Denmark
Day 34
Szczecin, Poland
Days 35 - 36
Kiel, Germany
Dublin, Ireland image
Day 1
Dublin, Ireland
Dublin is making a comeback. The decade-long "Celtic Tiger" boom era was quickly followed by the Great Recession, but The Recovery has finally taken a precarious hold. For visitors, this newer and wiser Dublin has become one of western Europe's most popular and delightful urban destinations. Whether or not you're out to enjoy the old or new Dublin, you'll find it a colossally entertaining city, all the more astonishing considering its intimate size.It is ironic and telling that James Joyce chose Dublin as the setting for his famous Ulysses, Dubliners, and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man because it was a "center of paralysis" where nothing much ever changed. Which only proves that even the greats get it wrong sometimes. Indeed, if Joyce were to return to his once-genteel hometown today—disappointed with the city's provincial outlook, he left it in 1902 at the age of 20—and take a quasi-Homeric odyssey through the city (as he so famously does in Ulysses), would he even recognize Dublin as his "Dear Dirty Dumpling, foostherfather of fingalls and dotthergills"?For instance, what would he make of Temple Bar—the city's erstwhile down-at-the-heels neighborhood, now crammed with cafés and trendy hotels and suffused with a nonstop, international-party atmosphere? Or the simple sophistication of the open-air restaurants of the tiny Italian Quarter (named Quartier Bloom after his own creation), complete with sultry tango lessons? Or of the hot–cool Irishness, where every aspect of Celtic culture results in sold-out theaters, from Once, the cult indie movie and Broadway hit, to Riverdance, the old Irish mass-jig recast as a Las Vegas extravaganza? Plus, the resurrected Joyce might be stirred by the songs of Hozier, fired up by the sultry acting of Michael Fassbender, and moved by the award-winning novels of Colum McCann. As for Ireland's capital, it's packed with elegant shops and hotels, theaters, galleries, coffeehouses, and a stunning variety of new, creative little restaurants can be found on almost every street in Dublin, transforming the provincial city that suffocated Joyce into a place almost as cosmopolitan as the Paris to which he fled. And the locals are a hell of a lot more fun! Now that the economy has finally turned a corner, Dublin citizens can cast a cool eye over the last 20 crazy years. Some argue that the boomtown transformation of their heretofore-tranquil city has permanently affected its spirit and character. These skeptics (skepticism long being a favorite pastime in the capital city) await the outcome of "Dublin: The Sequel," and their greatest fear is the possibility that the tattered old lady on the Liffey has become a little less unique, a little more like everywhere else.Oh ye of little faith: the rare ole gem that is Dublin is far from buried. The fundamentals—the Georgian elegance of Merrion Square, the Norman drama of Christ Church Cathedral, the foamy pint at an atmospheric pub—are still on hand to gratify. Most of all, there are the locals themselves: the nod and grin when you catch their eye on the street, the eagerness to hear half your life story before they tell you all of theirs, and their paradoxically dark but warm sense of humor. It's expected that 2016 will be an extra-special year in the capital, as centenary celebrations of the fateful 1916 Easter Rising will dominate much of the cultural calendar.
Belfast, Northern Ireland image
Day 2
Belfast, Northern Ireland
In Belfast, the echoes of its shipbuilding legacy reverberate through time, beckoning travelers to explore its maritime heritage. Amidst the bustling streets, whispers of the Titanic's construction resonate, reminding visitors of the city's pivotal role in maritime history. The climate, kissed by the Irish Sea's bracing winds, offers a refreshing escape for those seeking an authentic experience. Beyond the typical tourist haunts, Belfast unveils hidden gems, from traditional pubs echoing with lively tunes to quaint cobblestone streets steeped in character. As a showcase for Northern Ireland's resilience, Belfast's vibrant spirit endures, captivating cruisegoers with its unwavering charm.
Ullapool, Scotland image
Day 3
Ullapool, Scotland
Ullapool is an ideal base for hiking throughout Sutherland and taking wildlife and nature cruises, especially to the Summer Isles. By the shores of salty Loch Broom, the town was founded in 1788 as a fishing station to exploit the local herring stocks. There's still a smattering of fishing vessels, as well as visiting yachts and foreign ships. When their crews fill the pubs, Ullapool has a cosmopolitan feel. The harbor area comes to life when the Lewis ferry arrives and departs.
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland image
Day 4
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Haugesund, Norway image
Day 5
Haugesund, Norway
Set amidst Norway's rugged coast, Haugesund beckons with tales of its Viking ancestry, a testament to its maritime legacy. Here, where the North Sea meets the fjords, a temperate maritime climate graces the land, offering crisp sea breezes and vibrant coastal landscapes. This dynamic environment provides a backdrop for authentic encounters with local traditions, from seafood feasts to folk festivals celebrating Norway's rich cultural heritage. As a gateway to the breathtaking Lysefjord and iconic Preikestolen cliff, Haugesund offers a glimpse into the heart of Norway's natural splendor. Delight in the sight of cascading waterfalls and towering cliffs, where nature's majesty reigns supreme.
Nordfjordeid, Norway image
Day 6
Nordfjordeid, Norway
Trondheim, Norway image
Day 7
Trondheim, Norway
One of Scandinavia's oldest cities, Trondheim was the first capital of Norway, from AD 997 to 1380. Founded in 997 by Viking king Olav Tryggvason, it was first named Nidaros (still the name of the cathedral), a composite word referring to the city's location at the mouth of the Nidelva River. Today, it's Central Norway's largest (and Norway's third largest) city, with a population of 150,000. The wide streets of the historic city center remain lined with brightly painted wood houses and striking warehouses. But it's no historic relic: it's also the home to NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) and is Norway's technological capital.
Ålesund, Norway image
Day 8
Ålesund, Norway

The coastal town of Ålesund is the commercial capital of the Møre og Romsdal district. But more important, it is noted for its characteristic Jugendstil (Art Nouveau) buildings, which some claim make Ålesund one of the most beautiful towns in Norway. This Art Nouveau style emerged when the town was completely rebuilt after a devastating fire in 1904 destroyed nearly 800 buildings and left 10,000 residents homeless. It is said that the fire started by a tipped oil lamp. Rebuilding was carried out with the help of many young, foreign architects who added their own flourishes to the architectural blend of German Jugendstil and Viking roots. Today, narrow streets are crammed with buildings topped with turrets, spires and gables that bear decorations of dragonheads and curlicues. As one of the few remaining Art Nouveau towns in the world, in 1998 Ålesund was awarded the coveted Houens National Memorial Prize for the preservation of its unique architecture.

River travel image
Day 9
River travel
Oslo, Norway image
Day 10
Oslo, Norway
Oslo is the capital of Norway and is also its largest city, situated at the head of Oslo Fjord and surrounded by hills and forests. Home to some 50 museums and full of galleries, cafés, a sculpture park and the Royal Palace, this vibrant city with its handsome 19th-century buildings and wide streets has much to offer. Its history dates back 1,000 years, and includes a rich seafaring heritage that ranges from the Viking era to Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon Tiki expedition. Discover more about this exciting city on our varied selection of excursions.
Helsingborg, Sweden image
Day 11
Helsingborg, Sweden
Copenhagen, Denmark image
Day 12
Copenhagen, Denmark

By the 11th century, Copenhagen was already an important trading and fishing centre and today you will find an attractive city which, although the largest in Scandinavia, has managed to retain its low-level skyline. Discover some of the famous attractions including Gefion Fountain and Amalienborg Palace, perhaps cruise the city’s waterways, visit Rosenborg Castle or explore the medieval fishing village of Dragoer. Once the home of Hans Christian Andersen, Copenhagen features many reminders of its fairytale heritage and lives up to the reputation immortalised in the famous song ‘Wonderful Copenhagen’.

Warnemünde, Germany image
Days 13 - 14
Warnemünde, Germany

It may not have quite the same wow-factor as the likes of fellow Baltic cities St Petersburg, Riga and Stockholm, but the German town of Warnemünde has still got plenty to offer as a port of call. The seaside resort, situated near Rostock, is known for its long beachfront and marina, where cruise ships dock. Warnemünde is also the gateway to Germany’s historic and bustling capital, Berlin, and various cruise lines offer shore excursions to the city from Warnemünde.

Karlskrona, Sweden image
Day 15
Karlskrona, Sweden
Visby, Sweden image
Day 16
Visby, Sweden
Gotland is Sweden's main holiday island, a place of ancient history, a relaxed summer-party vibe, wide sandy beaches, and wild cliff formations called raukar (the remnants of reefs formed more than 400 million years ago). Measuring 125 km (78 miles) long and 52 km (32 miles) at its widest point, Gotland is where Swedish sheep farming has its home. In its charming glades, 35 varieties of wild orchids thrive, attracting botanists from all over the world.
Maarianhamina (Mariehamn), Finland image
Day 17
Maarianhamina (Mariehamn), Finland
Vaasa (Vasa), Finland image
Day 18
Vaasa (Vasa), Finland
Kemi, Finland image
Days 19 - 20
Kemi, Finland
Luleå, Sweden image
Day 21
Luleå, Sweden
Sundsvall, Sweden image
Day 22
Sundsvall, Sweden
Stockholm, Sweden image
Days 23 - 24
Stockholm, Sweden
Stockholm is a city in the flush of its second youth. Since the mid-1990s, Sweden's capital has emerged from its cold, Nordic shadow to take the stage as a truly international city. What started with entry into the European Union in 1995 gained pace with the extraordinary IT boom of the late 1990s, strengthened with the Skype-led IT second wave of 2003, and solidified with the hedge-fund invasion that is still happening today as Stockholm gains even more global confidence. And despite more recent economic turmoil, Stockholm's 1 million or so inhabitants have, almost as one, realized that their city is one to rival Paris, London, New York, or any other great metropolis.With this realization comes change. Stockholm has become a city of design, fashion, innovation, technology, and world-class food, pairing homegrown talent with an international outlook. The streets are flowing with a young and confident population keen to drink in everything the city has to offer. The glittering feeling of optimism, success, and living in the here and now is rampant in Stockholm.Stockholm also has plenty of history. Positioned where the waters of Lake Mälaren rush into the Baltic, it’s been an important trading site and a wealthy international city for centuries. Built on 14 islands joined by bridges crossing open bays and narrow channels, Stockholm boasts the story of its history in its glorious medieval old town, grand palaces, ancient churches, sturdy edifices, public parks, and 19th-century museums—its history is soaked into the very fabric of its airy boulevards, built as a public display of trading glory.
Helsinki, Finland image
Days 25 - 26
Helsinki, Finland

A city of the sea, Helsinki was built along a series of oddly shaped peninsulas and islands jutting into the Baltic coast along the Gulf of Finland. Streets and avenues curve around bays, bridges reach to nearby islands, and ferries ply among offshore islands.Having grown dramatically since World War II, Helsinki now absorbs more than one-tenth of the Finnish population. The metro area covers 764 square km (474 square miles) and 315 islands. Most sights, hotels, and restaurants cluster on one peninsula, forming a compact central hub. The greater Helsinki metropolitan area, which includes Espoo and Vantaa, has a total population of more than a million people.Helsinki is a relatively young city compared with other European capitals. In the 16th century, King Gustav Vasa of Sweden decided to woo trade from the Estonian city of Tallinn and thus challenge the Hanseatic League's monopoly on Baltic trade. Accordingly, he commanded the people of four Finnish towns to pack up their belongings and relocate to the rapids on the River Vantaa. The new town, founded on June 12, 1550, was named Helsinki.For three centuries, Helsinki (Helsingfors in Swedish) had its ups and downs as a trading town. Turku, to the west, remained Finland's capital and intellectual center. However, Helsinki's fortunes improved when Finland fell under Russian rule as an autonomous grand duchy. Czar Alexander I wanted Finland's political center closer to Russia and, in 1812, selected Helsinki as the new capital. Shortly afterward, Turku suffered a disastrous fire, forcing the university to move to Helsinki. The town's future was secure.Just before the czar's proclamation, a fire destroyed many of Helsinki's traditional wooden structures, precipitating the construction of new buildings suitable for a nation's capital. The German-born architect Carl Ludvig Engel was commissioned to rebuild the city, and as a result, Helsinki has some of the purest neoclassical architecture in the world. Add to this foundation the influence of Stockholm and St. Petersburg with the local inspiration of 20th-century Finnish design, and the result is a European capital city that is as architecturally eye-catching as it is distinct from other Scandinavian capitals. You are bound to discover endless engaging details—a grimacing gargoyle; a foursome of males supporting a balcony's weight on their shoulders; a building painted in striking colors with contrasting flowers in the windows. The city's 400 or so parks make it particularly inviting in summer.Today, Helsinki is still a meeting point of eastern and western Europe, which is reflected in its cosmopolitan image, the influx of Russians and Estonians, and generally multilingual population. Outdoor summer bars ("terrassit" as the locals call them) and cafés in the city center are perfect for people watching on a summer afternoon.

Kotka, Finland image
Day 27
Kotka, Finland
Tallinn, Estonia image
Day 28
Tallinn, Estonia
Estonia's history is sprinkled liberally with long stretches of foreign domination, beginning in 1219 with the Danes, followed without interruption by the Germans, Swedes, and Russians. Only after World War I, with Russia in revolutionary wreckage, was Estonia able to declare its independence. Shortly before World War II, in 1940, that independence was usurped by the Soviets, who—save for a brief three-year occupation by Hitler's Nazis—proceeded to suppress all forms of national Estonian pride for the next 50 years. Estonia finally regained independence in 1991. In the early 1990s, Estonia's own Riigikogu (Parliament), not some other nation's puppet ruler, handed down from the Upper City reforms that forced Estonia to blaze its post-Soviet trail to the European Union. Estonia has been a member of the EU since 2004, and in 2011, the country and its growing economy joined the Eurozone. Tallinn was also named the European City of Culture in 2011, cementing its growing reputation as a cultural hot spot.
Saaremaa sadam, Estonia image
Day 29
Saaremaa sadam, Estonia
Riga, Latvia image
Day 30
Riga, Latvia

Often referred to as the ‘Paris of the North’ and voted the European Capital of Culture in 2014, Latvia’s capital Riga has become a popular destination among city breakers in recent years. The port city’s charming, medieval old town, a Unesco World Heritage site, draws visitors with its well-preserved Hanseatic and German-style Art Nouveau architecture, world-class museums and quaint pavement cafes.

Gdansk, Poland image
Days 31 - 32
Gdansk, Poland
Found along the Baltic shores, the Port of Gdansk beckons with tales of maritime glory, tracing its roots back to the Teutonic Knights and Hanseatic League. Here, amidst the briny air and rugged coastlines, cruisegoers encounter Poland's spirited soul. The temperate climate ushers in refreshing sea breezes, perfect for strolling the storied streets of Old Town or savoring pierogi in cozy waterfront cafes. Away from tourist bustle, Gdansk offers an authentic glimpse into Polish life, where amber treasures gleam in artisan workshops and medieval spires punctuate the skyline. As Europe's largest medieval port, Gdansk brims with maritime heritage, a testament to Poland's enduring maritime legacy.
Rønne, Denmark image
Day 33
Rønne, Denmark
Szczecin, Poland image
Day 34
Szczecin, Poland
Kiel, Germany image
Days 35 - 36
Kiel, Germany

Known for the Kiel Canal and Kiel Week, the city boasts an important maritime history. Kiel is also a great place to sight-see, do some shopping and take part in one of the many festivals taking place there.

Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Sirena

The better-than-new Sirena blends sophistication with a contemporary flair to create a casually elegant ambiance that embodies the most treasured elements of our celebrated ships. Every surface of every suite and stateroom is entirely new, while in the public spaces, a refreshed colour palette of soft sea and sky tones surrounds a tasteful renewal of fabrics, furnishings and lighting fixtures that exquisitely encompasses the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises.

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