33 nights onboard Insignia

Epic Passage To Hibernia

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

Leaving from: Miami, Florida
Cruise ship: Insignia
Visiting: Miami, Florida Kings Wharf Horta, Azores Ponta Delgada, Azores
Oceania Cruises Logo
Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

656
Passengers
400
Crew
1999
Launched
2018
Last refit
30277t
Tonnage
180m
Length
25.5m
Width
18kts
Speed
9
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Days 2 - 3
River travel
Day 4
Kings Wharf, Bermuda
Days 5 - 8
River travel
Day 9
Horta, Azores, Portugal
Day 10
Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal
Day 11
River travel
Days 12 - 13
Lisbon, Portugal
Day 14
Porto, Portugal
Day 15
La Coruña, Spain
Day 16
Bilbao, Spain
Days 17 - 18
Pauillac, France
Day 19
River travel
Day 20
Honfleur, France
Day 21
Dunkirk, France
Day 22
Zeebrugge, Belgium
Day 23
Southampton, England
Day 24
River travel
Day 25
Newcastle upon Tyne, England
Day 26
Rosyth, Scotland
Day 27
Aberdeen, Scotland
Day 28
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Day 29
Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland
Day 30
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Day 31
Dublin, Ireland
Day 32
Cobh, Ireland
Day 33
River travel
Day 34
Southampton, England
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Imagine setting sail from the vibrant Port of Miami, where the excitement of your upcoming journey infuses the air. As you board the luxurious liner, the gateway to the world opens before you. Your voyage will whisk you away to stunning destinations across the globe, each offering a unique blend of culture, cuisine, and breathtaking scenery. Aboard the ship, indulge in top-tier amenities, from sumptuous dining options to enthralling entertainment, all while making unforgettable connections with fellow adventurers. This world cruise promises not just a holiday, but a grand exploration that will enrich your life with every nautical mile.
River travel image
Days 2 - 3
River travel
Kings Wharf, Bermuda image
Day 4
Kings Wharf, Bermuda
You go to heaven if you want - I'd rather stay here in Bermuda!' So gushed Mark Twain in the 19th century, and Bermuda's promise of sun and sea still lures holiday-makers to its shores. Settled by the English Virginia Company in 1609, Bermuda is the oldest and most populous of Britain's remaining overseas territories. These days, celebrities like Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones call Bermuda home. The island is surrounded by a fantastic coral reef that harbours colourful fish and has ensnared scores of shipwrecks, making for memorable diving and snorkelling.
River travel image
Days 5 - 8
River travel
Horta, Azores, Portugal image
Day 9
Horta, Azores, Portugal
In the heart of the Azores archipelago, Horta beckons with a maritime legacy as colorful as its shores. Set against a backdrop of rugged cliffs and azure waters, Horta's history intertwines with tales of intrepid explorers and daring seafarers who sought refuge in its harbor. The island's mild climate offers respite from the bustle of city life, inviting travelers to immerse themselves in its unspoiled landscapes and authentic charm. From whale watching excursions to exploring volcanic caves, Horta provides a gateway to the true essence of the Azores. Don't miss the chance to sample the local delicacy, barnacle stew, a culinary tradition passed down through generations.
Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal image
Day 10
Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal

The ‘Green Island’ of the Azores is a lush paradise, full of bountiful charms and natural wonders. The capital of the Portuguese archipelago, Ponta Delgada is situated on the south coast of the island of Sao Miguel. Along with green pastures and dramatic landscapes, the Azorean capital also features an impressive 16th century fort and postcard-perfect old town, complete with historic architecture, Portuguese churches and old forts.

River travel image
Day 11
River travel
Lisbon, Portugal image
Days 12 - 13
Lisbon, Portugal

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Porto, Portugal image
Day 14
Porto, Portugal

Lively, commercial Oporto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Also called Porto for short, the word easily brings to mind the city's most famous product - port wine. Oporto's strategic location on the north bank of the Douro River has accounted for the town's importance since ancient times.

La Coruña, Spain image
Day 15
La Coruña, Spain

Situated on the northwestern tip of the Iberian Peninsula, the city of La Coruña (or A Coruña, its official name) is the closest European port to New York. And perhaps in keeping with its location, the coastal city itself is charming blend of old and new, filled with culture, splendid architecture and fascinating museums, along with pristine beaches and open spaces. La Coruña is also the gateway to Galicia, one of the most verdant and scenic regions in Spain.

Bilbao, Spain image
Day 16
Bilbao, Spain
Bilbao Cruise Terminal serves as a gateway to the heart of Basque culture, situated strategically in the revitalized port area, a testament to the city's industrial past and its dynamic present. The climate here is oceanic, providing visitors with a comfortable atmosphere to explore year-round, often shielded from the extremes of Spanish weather. The terminal is not just a point of transit but a starting place to dive into the local life with nearby attractions like the Ribera Market or the buzzing nightlife of Pozas Street. A unique feature of this terminal is its proximity to the Bilbao Guggenheim Museum, just a stone's throw away, making high art immediately accessible to disembarking passengers and showcasing the city’s commitment to integrating tradition with avant-garde innovations.
Pauillac, France image
Days 17 - 18
Pauillac, France
River travel image
Day 19
River travel
Honfleur, France image
Day 20
Honfleur, France
Honfleur, the most picturesque of the Côte Fleurie's seaside towns, is a time-burnished place with a surplus of half-timber houses and cobbled streets that are lined with a stunning selection of stylish boutiques. Much of its Renaissance architecture remains intact—especially around the 17th-century Vieux Bassin harbor, where the water is fronted on one side by two-story stone houses with low, sloping roofs and on the other by tall slate-topped houses with wooden facades. Maritime expeditions (including some of the first voyages to Canada) departed from here; later, Impressionists were inspired to capture it on canvas. But the town as a whole has become increasingly crowded since the Pont de Normandie opened in 1995. Providing a direct link with Upper Normandy, the world's sixth-largest cable-stayed bridge is supported by two concrete pylons taller than the Eiffel Tower and designed to resist winds of 257 kph (160 mph).
Dunkirk, France image
Day 21
Dunkirk, France
Zeebrugge, Belgium image
Day 22
Zeebrugge, Belgium
In 1895 work began to construct a new seaport and harbour next to the tiny village of Zeebrugge, situated on the North Sea coast. Today the fast-expanding port of Zeebrugge is one of the busiest in Europe and its marina is Belgium’s most important fishing port. Many attempts were made to destroy this important port during both World Wars. Zeebrugge is ideally located for discovering the historic city of Bruges, and delightful seaside resorts with long sandy beaches can be visited by using the trams that run the whole length of the Belgian coast. Please note that no food may be taken ashore in Belgium. We shall not be offering shuttle buses to Bruges, but you may visit the city on an optional excursion: those visiting Bruges should note that there may be quite a long walk from the coach to the town centre.
Southampton, England image
Day 23
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

River travel image
Day 24
River travel
Newcastle upon Tyne, England image
Day 25
Newcastle upon Tyne, England
In Newcastle, where the Tyne River meets the North Sea, you're welcomed by a maritime legacy etched deep in the city's character. Famous for its shipbuilding prowess, Newcastle boasts a rugged charm that mirrors its weather – a blend of bracing sea breezes and hearty sunshine. This unique climate sets the stage for authentic experiences, inviting cruisegoers to explore beyond the beaten path. Nestled amidst iconic landmarks like the Angel of the North, Newcastle offers a taste of England's industrial past alongside vibrant cultural scenes. And did you know? Newcastle's famed bridges, including the Tyne Bridge, inspired the design of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.
Rosyth, Scotland image
Day 26
Rosyth, Scotland
Welcome to Rosyth, where the echoes of naval history resound along its shores. This maritime gem boasts a temperate climate, offering mild summers and crisp winters, perfect for exploring its rugged coastline and quaint fishing villages. Away from the bustling tourist hubs, Rosyth offers an authentic glimpse into Scotland's coastal charm, where locals share stories passed down through generations. Cruise lines like Norwegian Cruise Line and Holland America Line anchor here, providing access to hidden gems like the historic Rosyth Castle. Fun fact: Rosyth is home to the Royal Navy's largest dockyard, a testament to its strategic importance throughout the centuries.
Aberdeen, Scotland image
Day 27
Aberdeen, Scotland
With close to 220,000 inhabitants, Aberdeen is Scotland's third most populous city. Locally quarried grey granite was used during the mid-18th to mid-20th centuries for many of Aberdeen's buildings, and hence the nicknames it has earned as the Granite City, or the Grey City. Aberdeen granite was also used to build the terraces of the Houses of Parliament and Waterloo Bridge in London. Since the discovery of North Sea oil in the 1970s, Aberdeen has also been called the Oil Capital of Europe or the Energy Capital of Europe. It is no wonder that because of the oil fields in the North Sea, Aberdeen's seaport is very important. The Heliport with its flights to the oil fields is one of the busiest commercial heliports in the world.
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland image
Day 28
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland image
Day 29
Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland
Belfast, Northern Ireland image
Day 30
Belfast, Northern Ireland
In Belfast, the echoes of its shipbuilding legacy reverberate through time, beckoning travelers to explore its maritime heritage. Amidst the bustling streets, whispers of the Titanic's construction resonate, reminding visitors of the city's pivotal role in maritime history. The climate, kissed by the Irish Sea's bracing winds, offers a refreshing escape for those seeking an authentic experience. Beyond the typical tourist haunts, Belfast unveils hidden gems, from traditional pubs echoing with lively tunes to quaint cobblestone streets steeped in character. As a showcase for Northern Ireland's resilience, Belfast's vibrant spirit endures, captivating cruisegoers with its unwavering charm.
Dublin, Ireland image
Day 31
Dublin, Ireland
Dublin is making a comeback. The decade-long "Celtic Tiger" boom era was quickly followed by the Great Recession, but The Recovery has finally taken a precarious hold. For visitors, this newer and wiser Dublin has become one of western Europe's most popular and delightful urban destinations. Whether or not you're out to enjoy the old or new Dublin, you'll find it a colossally entertaining city, all the more astonishing considering its intimate size.It is ironic and telling that James Joyce chose Dublin as the setting for his famous Ulysses, Dubliners, and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man because it was a "center of paralysis" where nothing much ever changed. Which only proves that even the greats get it wrong sometimes. Indeed, if Joyce were to return to his once-genteel hometown today—disappointed with the city's provincial outlook, he left it in 1902 at the age of 20—and take a quasi-Homeric odyssey through the city (as he so famously does in Ulysses), would he even recognize Dublin as his "Dear Dirty Dumpling, foostherfather of fingalls and dotthergills"?For instance, what would he make of Temple Bar—the city's erstwhile down-at-the-heels neighborhood, now crammed with cafés and trendy hotels and suffused with a nonstop, international-party atmosphere? Or the simple sophistication of the open-air restaurants of the tiny Italian Quarter (named Quartier Bloom after his own creation), complete with sultry tango lessons? Or of the hot–cool Irishness, where every aspect of Celtic culture results in sold-out theaters, from Once, the cult indie movie and Broadway hit, to Riverdance, the old Irish mass-jig recast as a Las Vegas extravaganza? Plus, the resurrected Joyce might be stirred by the songs of Hozier, fired up by the sultry acting of Michael Fassbender, and moved by the award-winning novels of Colum McCann. As for Ireland's capital, it's packed with elegant shops and hotels, theaters, galleries, coffeehouses, and a stunning variety of new, creative little restaurants can be found on almost every street in Dublin, transforming the provincial city that suffocated Joyce into a place almost as cosmopolitan as the Paris to which he fled. And the locals are a hell of a lot more fun! Now that the economy has finally turned a corner, Dublin citizens can cast a cool eye over the last 20 crazy years. Some argue that the boomtown transformation of their heretofore-tranquil city has permanently affected its spirit and character. These skeptics (skepticism long being a favorite pastime in the capital city) await the outcome of "Dublin: The Sequel," and their greatest fear is the possibility that the tattered old lady on the Liffey has become a little less unique, a little more like everywhere else.Oh ye of little faith: the rare ole gem that is Dublin is far from buried. The fundamentals—the Georgian elegance of Merrion Square, the Norman drama of Christ Church Cathedral, the foamy pint at an atmospheric pub—are still on hand to gratify. Most of all, there are the locals themselves: the nod and grin when you catch their eye on the street, the eagerness to hear half your life story before they tell you all of theirs, and their paradoxically dark but warm sense of humor. It's expected that 2016 will be an extra-special year in the capital, as centenary celebrations of the fateful 1916 Easter Rising will dominate much of the cultural calendar.
Cobh, Ireland image
Day 32
Cobh, Ireland

The last port of call on the Titanic’s ill-fated voyage, the seaside town on Ireland’s south coast has a historic maritime legacy. One of the major transatlantic Irish ports, Cobh (pronounced ‘Cove’ and formerly known as Queenstown) was also the departure point for 2.5 million of the six million Irish people who emigrated to North America between 1848 and 1950. While visitors flock to Cobh to learn about its fascinating maritime and emigration history, they will also find the picturesque town blessed with a beautiful cathedral and a burgeoning bar and restaurant scene.

River travel image
Day 33
River travel
Southampton, England image
Day 34
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Insignia

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

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