14 nights onboard Norwegian Star

Iceland & Greenland

Winners 2022 Best for Entertainment

Recently refurbished as part of The Norwegian Edge programme, Norwegian Star brings freedom and flexibility to cruises spanning the Mediterranean, Northern Europe, South America, and Transatlantic.

Leaving from: Reykjavík
Cruise ship: Norwegian Star
Visiting: Reykjavík Qaqortoq (Julianehaab) Nanortalik Isafjørdur
Norwegian Cruise Line Logo
Norwegian Cruise Line

Founded in 1966, Miami-based Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL), part of global cruise company Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings (which also owns Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises), is the third-largest cruise line in the world in terms of cruise passengers. NCL has become well-known for its colourful ships featuring a pop-icon style painted hull.

2348
Passengers
1031
Crew
2001
Launched
2018
Last refit
91740t
Tonnage
294m
Length
38m
Width
25kts
Speed
11
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Day 3
Qaqortoq (Julianehaab), Greenland
Day 4
Nanortalik, Greenland
Day 7
Isafjørdur, Iceland
Day 8
Akureyri, Iceland
Day 9
Djúpivogur, Iceland
Day 10
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Day 11
Olden, Norway
Day 12
Bergen, Norway
Day 13
Ulvik, Norway
Day 14
Kristiansand, Norway
Day 15
Oslo, Norway
Reykjavík, Iceland image
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.
Qaqortoq (Julianehaab), Greenland image
Day 3
Qaqortoq (Julianehaab), Greenland
The largest town in southern Greenland, Qaqortoq has been inhabited since prehistoric times. Upon arrival in this charming southern Greenland enclave, it's easy to see why. Qaqortoq rises quite steeply over the fjord system around the city, offering breath-taking panoramic vistas of the surrounding mountains, deep, blue sea, Lake Tasersuag, icebergs in the bay, and pastoral backcountry. Although the earliest signs of ancient civilization in Qaqortoq date back 4,300 years, Qaqortoq is known to have been inhabited by Norse and Inuit settlers in the 10th and 12th centuries, and the present-day town was founded in 1774. In the years since, Qaqortoq has evolved into a seaport and trading hub for fish and shrimp processing, tanning, fur production, and ship maintenance and repair.
Nanortalik, Greenland image
Day 4
Nanortalik, Greenland
Nanortalik lies in a scenic area surrounded by steep mountainsides and is Greenland’s tenth-largest and most southerly town with less than 1500 inhabitants. The town’s name means the “place of polar bears”, which refers to the polar bears that used to be seen floating offshore on summer’s ice floes. Nanortalik has an excellent open-air museum that gives a broad picture of the region from Inuit times to today. Part of the exhibition is a summer hunting camp, where Inuit in traditional clothing describe aspects of their ancestor’s customs and lifestyle.
Isafjørdur, Iceland image
Day 7
Isafjørdur, Iceland
Two colossal terraces of sheer rock stand either side of this extraordinarily located town - which rides a jutting spit onto an immensity of black fjord water. Surprisingly, considering the remoteness of its location and its compact size, Isafjordur is a modern and lively place to visit, offering a great choice of cafes and delicious restaurants – which are well stocked to impress visitors. The town is a perfectly located base for adventures amongst Iceland's fantastic wilderness - with skiing, hiking and water-sports popular pursuits among visitors.
Akureyri, Iceland image
Day 8
Akureyri, Iceland

Northeast of the country’s capital city Reykjavík lies Akureyri, the oldest and second-largest town in Iceland. The charming, pint-sized city may be small in size with a population of just 20,000, but it is a surprisingly lively place with a wealth of attractions and activities, not to mention remarkable natural wonders. Boasting one of the best skiing areas in the country as well as great hiking trails, an 18-hole golf course and Icelandic swimming pools, Akureyri is an ideal port of call for the active among you, as well cruise passengers in search of the elusive and ethereal northern lights.

Djúpivogur, Iceland image
Day 9
Djúpivogur, Iceland
It may be surrounded by pulse-raising volcanic scenery, boast extraordinary wildlife, and sit on a dramatic, jutting fjord - but it's fair to say Djúpivogur likes to take things slow. In fact, Djúpivogur relishes its peace and quiet so much that it's won recognition as a 'Cittaslow' - a Slow City. So prepare to take a new, leisurely look around, as you relax into the breathtaking natural glory of Iceland, and explore this unique location - filled with folklore, fabulous food and fantastic fjords.
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands image
Day 10
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Olden, Norway image
Day 11
Olden, Norway

Olden is increasingly becoming a customary stop on a Norwegian fjords cruise. Often referred to as the gateway to Norway’s glaciers, Olden – located at the mouth of the Oldeelva river on the southern end of the 106km Nordfjorden – boasts its own spectacular surrounding landscape, dotted with valleys, waterfalls and mountains.

Bergen, Norway image
Day 12
Bergen, Norway

Surrounded by mountains and sparkling fjords, the waterside city of Bergen has a spectacular setting. There has been a settlement here since medieval times and the colourful waterfront buildings of the Hanseatic wharf, known as Bryggen, are testament to its fascinating history of trade. As Norway’s best known medieval settlement, the Bryggen is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Our comprehensive selection of excursions allows you to discover the many sides of Bergen, such as the fish market and narrow cobbled streets, as well as stunning views of the city from the summit of Mt Fløyen. Alternatively, those who have visited the city previously may like to experience one of the tours that travel further afield. Just 300 yards from the main piers, you will find the Fortress Museum (Fesningsmuseum), which has an interesting collection of objects related to World War II.

Ulvik, Norway image
Day 13
Ulvik, Norway
Kristiansand, Norway image
Day 14
Kristiansand, Norway
Nicknamed "Sommerbyen" ("Summer City"), Norway's fifth-largest city has 78,000 inhabitants. Norwegians come here for its sun-soaked beaches and beautiful harbor. Kristiansand has also become known internationally for the outdoor Quart Festival, which hosts local and international rock bands every July. According to legend, in 1641 King Christian IV marked the four corners of Kristiansand with his walking stick, and within that framework the grid of wide streets was laid down. The center of town, called the Kvadraturen, still retains the grid, even after numerous fires. In the northeast corner is Posebyen, one of northern Europe's largest collections of low, connected wooden house settlements, and there's a market here every Saturday in summer. Kristiansand's Fisketorvet (fish market) is near the south corner of the town's grid, right on the sea.
Oslo, Norway image
Day 15
Oslo, Norway
Oslo is the capital of Norway and is also its largest city, situated at the head of Oslo Fjord and surrounded by hills and forests. Home to some 50 museums and full of galleries, cafés, a sculpture park and the Royal Palace, this vibrant city with its handsome 19th-century buildings and wide streets has much to offer. Its history dates back 1,000 years, and includes a rich seafaring heritage that ranges from the Viking era to Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon Tiki expedition. Discover more about this exciting city on our varied selection of excursions.
Ship Details
Norwegian Cruise Line
Norwegian Star

Recently refurbished as part of The Norwegian Edge programme, Norwegian Star brings freedom and flexibility to cruises spanning the Mediterranean, Northern Europe, South America, and Transatlantic.

Find your perfect cruise!
Cabins
All Prices