22 nights onboard Insignia

Exotic Atlantic Shores

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

Leaving from: Rio de Janeiro
Cruise ship: Insignia
Visiting: Rio de Janeiro Montevideo Buenos Aires Buenos Aires
Oceania Cruises Logo
Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

656
Passengers
400
Crew
1999
Launched
2018
Last refit
30277t
Tonnage
180m
Length
25.5m
Width
18kts
Speed
9
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Days 2 - 3
River travel
Day 4
Montevideo, Uruguay
Days 5 - 6
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Day 7
Punta del Este, Uruguay
Days 8 - 12
River travel
Day 13
Edinburgh, Scotland
Days 14 - 17
River travel
Days 18 - 19
Walvis Bay, Namibia
Day 20
Lüderitz, Namibia
Day 21
River travel
Days 22 - 23
Cape Town, South Africa
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil image
Day 1
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Welcome to the Cidade Maravilhosa, or the Marvelous City, as Rio is known in Brazil. Synonymous with the girl from Ipanema, the dramatic views from Christ the Redeemer atop Corcovado mountain, and fabulously flamboyant Carnival celebrations, Rio is a city of stunning architecture, abundant museums, and marvelous food. Rio is also home to 23 beaches, an almost continuous 73-km (45-mile) ribbon of sand.As you leave the airport and head to Rio's beautiful Zona Sul (the touristic South Zone), you'll drive for about 40 minutes on a highway from where you'll begin to get a sense of the dramatic contrast between beautiful landscape and devastating poverty. In this teeming metropolis of 12 million people (6.2 million of whom live in Rio proper), the very rich and the very poor live in uneasy proximity. You'll drive past seemingly endless cinder-block favela, but by the time you reach Copacabana's breezy, sunny Avenida Atlântica—flanked on one side by white beach and azure sea and on the other by condominiums and hotels—your heart will leap with expectation as you begin to recognize the postcard-famous sights. Now you're truly in Rio, where cariocas (Rio residents) and tourists live life to its fullest.Enthusiasm is contagious in Rio. Prepare to have your senses engaged and your inhibitions untied. Rio seduces with a host of images: the joyous bustle of vendors at Sunday's Feira Hippie (Hippie Fair); the tipsy babble at sidewalk cafés as patrons sip their last glass of icy beer under the stars; the blanket of lights beneath the Pão de Açúcar (Sugarloaf Mountain); the bikers, joggers, strollers, and power walkers who parade along the beach each morning. Borrow the carioca spirit for your stay; you may find yourself reluctant to give it back.
River travel image
Days 2 - 3
River travel
Montevideo, Uruguay image
Day 4
Montevideo, Uruguay
Uruguay’s capital city hugs the eastern bank of the Río de la Plata. A massive coastal promenade (malecón) that passes fine beaches, restaurants, and numerous parks recalls the sunny sophistications of the Mediterranean and is always dotted with Montevideans strolling, exercising, and lounging along the water. Montevideo has its share of glitzy shopping avenues and modern office buildings, balanced with its historic old city and sumptuous colonial architecture, as well as numerous leafy plazas and parks. It is hard not to draw comparisons to its sister city Buenos Aires across the river, and indeed Montevideo strikes many as a calmer, more manageable incarnation of Argentina's capital.When the weather's good, La Rambla, a 22-km (14-mile) waterfront avenue that links the Old City with the eastern suburbs and changes names about a dozen times, gets packed with fishermen, ice-cream vendors, and joggers. Around sunset, volleyball and soccer games wind down as couples begin to appear for evening strolls. Polls consistently rate Montevideo as having the highest quality of life of any city in Latin America. After one visit here, especially on a lovely summer evening, you probably will agree.
Buenos Aires, Argentina image
Days 5 - 6
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Glamorous and gritty, Buenos Aires is two cities in one. What makes Argentina's capital so fascinating is its dual heritage—part European, part Latin American. Plaza de Mayo resembles a grand square in Madrid, and the ornate Teatro Colón would not be out of place in Vienna. But you’ll know you’re in South America by the leather shoes for sale on cobbled streets and impromptu parades of triumphant soccer fans. Limited-production wines, juicy steaks, and ice cream in countless flavors are among the old-world imports the city has perfected.
Punta del Este, Uruguay image
Day 7
Punta del Este, Uruguay
Often likened to the Hamptons or St-Tropez, Punta del Este is a flashy destination where parties run nonstop in peak season. But it is also a destination that draws a range of beachgoers to its shores, from summering families to the celebrity jet-set. There's a bustling city on the beach downtown, as well as quiet countryside populated solely with upscale ranches called chacras or estancias, and creative, buzzing hamlets like La Barra and José Ignacio. Though it's pricey and at times a logistical challenge to get around, everyone finds something about Punta to love.The resort takes its name from the "east point" marking the division of the Río de la Plata on the west from the Atlantic Ocean to the east. It also lends its name to the broader region encompassing the nearby communities of Punta Ballena and La Barra de Maldonado. These days even José Ignacio, some 20 miles away, is grouped in. It's usually a given that Argentina’s upper class spends at least part of the summer in Punta, soaking in the ample rays.
River travel image
Days 8 - 12
River travel
Edinburgh, Scotland image
Day 13
Edinburgh, Scotland

The magical city of Edinburgh has been captivating visitors for centuries and for good reason. Those new to Scotland’s legendary capital should head straight for its famed attractions, from Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace to the Royal Mile. Seasoned visitors, on the other hand, should consider venturing out of the city centre. The vibrant port neighbourhood of Leith is not just home to the city’s cruise terminal, but it’s also the place to sample some of the best seafood in Scotland, enjoy a waterside stroll or pay a visit to a local microbrewery. And you can’t go to Edinburgh without sampling a dram or two, so call in at The Scotch Whisky Experience on the famous Royal Mile for masterclasses and tastings. Summer visitors can enjoy world-class music, theatre and comedy during the renowned Edinburgh Festival. But there is truly no off season in this great city, and in winter the buzz and excitement around Christmas and Hogmanay make up for the fact that – as they say in these parts – it might be a ‘wee’ bit on the nippy side.

River travel image
Days 14 - 17
River travel
Walvis Bay, Namibia image
Days 18 - 19
Walvis Bay, Namibia
Once a whaling station, Walvis Bay provides a gateway to the extraordinary desert landscapes of Namibia and is itself an area of unusual natural beauty. The showpiece of the Walvis Bay area is the natural lagoon where you can see flamingos in their thousands at certain times of the year, along with a variety of other wading birds such as the white pelican. Further inland you will find the stunning Namib Desert, which provides an unlikely home for a diverse array of wildlife. Alternatively, you could venture into the desert of Sossusvlei, whose mountainous ochre sand dunes are said to be the highest in the world, or visit the colonial town of Swakopmund.
Lüderitz, Namibia image
Day 20
Lüderitz, Namibia
The reopening of the diamond mine at Elizabeth Bay 20 years ago has brought the development of tourism and fishing back to this small 19th century village on the barren, windswept Namib Desert coast. One of Namibias oddities, it has everything you'd expect from a small German town - delicatessens, coffee shops and a Lutheran church. Here, the icy but clean South Atlantic is home to seals, penguins and other marine life and the desolate beaches support flamingoes. It was founded in 1883 when Heinrich Vogelsang purchased Angra Pequena and some of the surrounding land on behalf of Adolf Lüderitz, a Hanseat from Germany, from the local Nama chief. Lüderitz began its life as a trading post, with other activities in fishing and guano-harvesting. As a sign of Luderitz's revival, 1996 staged the first traditional German Karneval since 1960.
River travel image
Day 21
River travel
Cape Town, South Africa image
Days 22 - 23
Cape Town, South Africa
Sometimes referred to as the Mother City, Cape Town is the most famous port in South Africa and is influenced by many different cultures, including Dutch, British and Malay. The port was founded in 1652 by Dutch explorer Jan Van Riebeeck, and evidence of Dutch colonial rule remains throughout the region. The port is located on one of the world's most important trade routes, and is mainly a container port and handler of fresh fruit. Fishing is another vital industry, with large Asian fishing fleets using Cape Town as a logistical repair base for much of the year. The region is famous for its natural beauty, with the imposing Table Mountain and Lions Head, as well as the many nature reserves and botanical gardens such as Kirstenbosch which boasts an extensive range of indigenous plant life, including proteas and ferns. Cape Town's weather is mercurial, and can change from beautiful sunshine to dramatic thunderstorms within a short period. A local adage is that in Cape Town you can experience four seasons in one day.
Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Insignia

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

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