15 nights onboard Le Bellot

Expedition from Greenland to Canada via Saint Pierre and Miquelon

Succumb to the charms of this 16-day expedition cruise aboard Le Bellot, sailing between Iceland and Canada via the stunning landscapes of Greenland. You will embark in Reykjavik, the most northerly capital in the world, lying slightly above the 64th parallel.

You will first travel through the narrow Prins Christian Sund passage, which connects the south-east of Greenland to the south-west. Jagged mountains, rocky cliffs, waterfalls and floating ice form a wonderful wild landscape in which frolic colonies of bearded seals.

After passing in front of the impressive Kujalleq Glacier, you will call at Aappilattoq, a small Inuit village with some one hundred inhabitants, dotted with colourful houses typical of this faraway land.

Le Bellot will head to Canada to call at l’Anse-aux-Meadows, a Viking archeological site from the 11th century listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, located north of the Canadian province of Newfoundland. “The Rock” honours its nickname: the mountains here plunge into the clear sea while the fjords slip inland. Although it appears inhospitable, this territory was nonetheless one of the first sites in the New World to become known in Europe. Saint-John’s, the capital of the province is one of the oldest anglophone cities in North America. It is nestled in the heart of a stunning natural environment and strolling through its historic core or along its sloping streets lined with colourful houses is an enjoyable experience.

A little piece of France located off the coast of Canada, the Saint Pierre and Miquelon archipelago has many charms. Here you will discover the lively island of Saint Pierre, its small houses with coloured facades and its natural harbour which sheltered many fishing boats in the past. The second island in the archipelago, Miquelon, will delight lovers of the great outdoors with its vast rolling meadows dotted with small lakes and lined with cliffs that disappear into the northern waters inhabited by seals.

At the mouth of Saguenay River, you will reach Tadoussac. This National Park is also an unmissable site for whale watching as the mammals gather to feed before winter.

After a port of call in the dynamic and cosmopolitan city of Montreal, your ship will continue its journey on the Saint Lawrence River, a prodigious waterway home to exceptionally beautiful nature.

To round off your cruise, you will sail along the shimmering waters of Lake Ontario before making your way to the cosmopolitan city of Toronto, where you will disembark.

Itinerary is subject to change according to port authorizations and government regulations. We are privileged guests in these remote lands where we are at the mercy of weather, ice, tidal and current conditions. Landings on certain sites and the observation of certain wildlife cannot be guaranteed. They vary from day to day, making each PONANT cruise a unique experience. The Captain and the Expedition Leader will make every effort to ensure that your experience is as rich as possible, while complying with the safety rules and instructions imposed by the AECO.

Leaving from: Reykjavík
Cruise ship: Le Bellot
Visiting: Reykjavík Prince Christian Sound Aappilattoq L'Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland and Labrador
Ponant Logo
Ponant

When searching for a luxury yacht expedition cruise, there’s one name above all else that you need to know – Ponant Cruises. Founded in 1988 by former French Merchant Navy officers, Ponant combines succulent luxury with authentic adventures on all seven continents.

From classic Mediterranean itineraries and Caribbean sailings, to bucket-list expeditions around Greenland and Antarctica, Ponant cruises proudly counteract the banality of mainstream voyages with a unique take on the concept of small-ship cruising. It’s the absolute trip of a lifetime.

184
Passengers
110
Crew
2020
Launched
9900t
Tonnage
131m
Length
18m
Width
6
Decks
EUR
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Day 3
Prince Christian Sound, Greenland
Day 4
Aappilattoq, Greenland
Day 7
L'Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
Day 8
Saint-John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
Day 9
Saint Pierre, Saint Pierre and Miquelon
Day 10
Miquelon Island, Saint Pierre and Miquelon
Day 11
Cap-aux-Meules, Magdalen Islands, Québec, Canada
Day 13
Tadoussac, Québec, Canada
Day 14
Montréal, Québec, Canada
Day 16
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Reykjavík, Iceland image
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.
Prince Christian Sound, Greenland image
Day 3
Prince Christian Sound, Greenland
Prince Christian Sound, known as Prins Christians Sund in Danish, is a narrow fjord in southern Greenland that offers a breathtaking passage through steep mountains and impressive glaciers. Named after Christian VIII of Denmark, the sound has a rich history rooted in Inuit presence and Norse exploration. This natural waterway has served as a vital navigation route for centuries, connecting the Labrador Sea with the Irminger Sea. The sound’s isolated and rugged landscape, often dotted with icebergs and surrounded by towering cliffs, has been a critical part of Greenland's maritime history, challenging sailors and enchanting visitors with its stark, raw beauty.
Aappilattoq, Greenland image
Day 4
Aappilattoq, Greenland
Aappilattoq is a small settlement near the western end of Prins Christian Sund in southwestern Greenland. In the local Greenlandic language the name means, "sea anemone". This small village of 130 inhabitants, hidden behind a prominent rock, offers a good insight into the life of Greenlandic Inuit. A stroll through the village will reveal a small school and a church, along with the likely possibility of seeing a polar bear skin drying in the wind behind a local dwelling. People have lived off the land in the area around Aappilattoq since the 19th century. The tradition continues today as most people here hunt and fish to make a living.
L'Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada image
Day 7
L'Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
Around the year 1000, Vikings from Greenland and Iceland founded the first European settlement in North America, near the northern tip of Newfoundland. They arrived in the New World 500 years before Columbus but stayed only a few years and were forgotten for centuries. Since the settlement's rediscovery in the last century, the archaeological site has brought tourism to the area. Viking themes abound but so do views, whales, icebergs, fun dining experiences, and outdoor activities. L'Anse Aux Meadows on the northern tip of the island of Newfoundland is a remote community of just 40 people, with St Anthony, 40 minutes away, having a population of only 3,500. The region is locally famous for springtime polar bears, nesting eider ducks, the northern extreme of the Appalachians at nearby Belle Isle, numerous spring and summer icebergs, and a rich ocean fishery. L’Anse Aux Meadows National Historic Site is the UNESCO World Heritage Site that tells the story of Leif Erickson and the first Europeans in the new world. This site is often the keystone attraction for cruises themed around the Vikings. Discovered in 1960, it is the site of a Norse village, the only known one in North America outside of Greenland. The site remains the only widely-accepted instance of pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact, and is notable for possible connections with the attempted colony of Vinland established by Leif Ericson around 1003, or more broadly with Norse exploration of the Americas. The root of the name "L'Anse aux Meadows" is believed to have originated with French fishermen in the area during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, who named the site L'Anse aux Meduses, meaning 'Jellyfish Bay'.
Saint-John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada image
Day 8
Saint-John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
Old meets new in the province's capital (metro-area population a little more than 200,000), with modern office buildings surrounded by heritage shops and colorful row houses. St. John's mixes English and Irish influences, Victorian architecture and modern convenience, and traditional music and rock and roll into a heady brew. The arts scene is lively, but overall the city moves at a relaxed pace.For centuries, Newfoundland was the largest supplier of salt cod in the world, and St. John's Harbour was the center of the trade. As early as 1627, the merchants of Water Street—then known as the Lower Path—were doing a thriving business buying fish, selling goods, and supplying alcohol to soldiers and sailors.
Saint Pierre, Saint Pierre and Miquelon image
Day 9
Saint Pierre, Saint Pierre and Miquelon
By heading almost due east from Cap-aux-Meules in Canada, it is possible to reach France in about one day’s worth of steaming! With barely 6,000 inhabitants living on tiny St. Pierre, it is the smallest French Overseas Collective. The residents of St. Pierre are predominantly descendants of Normans, Basque and Bretons and the French spoken is closer to Metropolitan French than to Canadian French. Although Basque is not spoken any longer, the influence is still felt through sport and a Basque Festival. Interestingly, this small island has two museums in part dedicated to the Prohibition. The Musée Heritage is St. Pierre’s newest museum with a focus on medical artefacts from the 19th and 20th century. Another claim to fame is a guillotine, the only one ever used in North America. In this quirky village it is easy to find the Post Office; just look for the clock tower shaped like a praying monk.
Miquelon Island, Saint Pierre and Miquelon image
Day 10
Miquelon Island, Saint Pierre and Miquelon
Cap-aux-Meules, Magdalen Islands, Québec, Canada image
Day 11
Cap-aux-Meules, Magdalen Islands, Québec, Canada
Tadoussac, Québec, Canada image
Day 13
Tadoussac, Québec, Canada
Sitting on the natural junction where the River Saguenay unloads into the massive Saint Lawrence, a visit to strategically located Tadoussac leaves you fantastically placed to explore some of Quebec's finest history, wildlife and scenery. Sail a little further up the Saguenay, and you’ll be confronted by the glorious Saguenay Fjord, as you cruise through verdant hills of dense forestry, and steep cliffs. Or, alternatively, voyage out onto the deep waters of the Saint Lawrence river, where you can spot the surface parting, as the world's largest animals - blue whales - slowly emerge from the depths to gulp in air. With a fantastic supply of krill to tempt the whales, you can even spot the various species that visit from Tadoussac’s shoreline – just make sure you brush up on your whale knowledge beforehand, at the Marine Mammal Interpretation Centre.The town was the first trading post established by the French when they landed here, and it remains the oldest of the settlements still in existence. As the name suggests, Tadoussac's Old Chapel, has an impressive history, and is North America's oldest wooden chapel. You wouldn't necessarily know it from the outside, however, as the charming little church gleams tidily with a fresh lick of cherry red and white paint.
Montréal, Québec, Canada image
Day 14
Montréal, Québec, Canada
Canada's most diverse metropolis, Montréal, is an island city that favors style and elegance over order or even prosperity, a city where past and present intrude on each other daily. In some ways it resembles Vienna—well past its peak of power and glory, perhaps, yet still vibrant and grand.But don't get the wrong idea. Montréal has always had a bit of an edge. During Prohibition, thirsty Americans headed north to the city on the St. Lawrence for booze, music, and a good time, and people still come for the same things. Summer festivals celebrate everything from comedy and French music and culture to beer and fireworks, and, of course, jazz. And on those rare weeks when there isn't a planned event, the party continues. Clubs and sidewalk cafés are abuzz from late afternoon to the early hours of the morning. And Montréal is a city that knows how to mix it up even when it's 20 below zero. Rue St-Denis is almost as lively on a Saturday night in January as it is in July, and the festival Montréal en Lumière, or Montréal Highlights, enlivens the dreary days of February with concerts, balls, and fine food.Montréal takes its name from Parc du Mont-Royal, a stubby plug of tree-covered igneous rock that rises 764 feet above the surrounding cityscape. Although its height is unimpressive, "the Mountain" forms one of Canada's finest urban parks, and views from the Chalet du Mont-Royal atop the hill provide an excellent orientation to the city's layout and major landmarks.Old Montréal is home to museums, the municipal government, and the magnificent Basilique Notre-Dame-de-Montréal within its network of narrow, cobblestone streets. Although Montréal's centre-ville, or Downtown, bustles like many other major cities on the surface, it's active below street level as well, in the so-called Underground City–-the underground levels of shopping malls and food courts connected by pedestrian tunnels and the city's subway system, or métro. Residential Plateau Mont-Royal and trendy neighborhoods are abuzz with restaurants, nightclubs, art galleries, and cafés. The greener areas of town are composed of the Parc du Mont-Royal and the Jardin Botanique.
Toronto, Ontario, Canada image
Day 16
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Toronto's allure as a cruise destination lies in its dynamic blend of cultural attractions and stunning cityscape. From the iconic CN Tower piercing the skyline to the historic Distillery District's cobblestone streets, the city offers a tapestry of experiences. Immerse yourself in world-class museums, vibrant neighborhoods like Kensington Market, and waterfront parks along Lake Ontario's shores. Entertainment options abound, with theaters, sports arenas, and festivals showcasing the city's creative energy. Whether exploring cultural landmarks or indulging in culinary delights, Toronto's diverse offerings promise an unforgettable urban adventure.
Ship Details
Ponant
Le Bellot

Featuring innovative and environmentally-friendly equipment, elegantly designed staterooms, spacious suites with large windows, and lounge areas that open onto the outside, this new limited-capacity yacht boasting∘ just 92 staterooms and suites will offer you a truly unique cruising experience.

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