20 nights onboard Queen Mary 2

Caribbean Celebration and Transatlantic Crossing

Queen Mary 2 is a remarkable flagship, her style and elegance are legendary. Above all, it‘s the space she offers and the luxury for you to do as little or as much as you wish which sets her apart.

Leaving from: New York, New York
Cruise ship: Queen Mary 2
Visiting: New York, New York Saint Thomas Saint Kitts Dominica
Cunard Line Logo
Cunard Line

The age of elegance lives on aboard Cunard's impressive fleet, with white-gloved afternoon teas, grand staircases, exuberant cabins and formal galas in elegant restaurants.

Now that Cunard has observed the centenary of its pioneering world cruise, the famous mantra of dignified excellence has intensified to create not just one of the greatest cruise experiences, but the finest travel money can buy.

2691
Passengers
1250
Crew
2004
Launched
2018
Last refit
148528t
Tonnage
345m
Length
41m
Width
28kts
Speed
12
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
New York, New York, United States
Day 5
Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon
Day 6
Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Day 7
Dominica, Dominica
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Day 8
Bridgetown, Barbados
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Evening
Day 9
Castries, Saint Lucia
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon
Day 10
Sint Maarten, Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Day 14
New York, New York, United States
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon
Day 21
Southampton, England
New York, New York, United States image
Day 1
New York, New York, United States
From Wall Street's skyscrapers to the neon of Times Square to Central Park's leafy paths, New York City pulses with an irrepressible energy. History meets hipness in this global center of entertainment, fashion, media, and finance. World-class museums like MoMA and unforgettable icons like the Statue of Liberty beckon, but discovering the subtler strains of New York's vast ambition is equally rewarding: ethnic enclaves and shops, historic streets of dignified brownstones, and trendy bars and eateries all add to the urban buzz.
Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands image
Day 5
Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands
If you fly to the 32-square-mile (83-square-km) island of St. Thomas, you land at its western end; if you arrive by cruise ship, you come into one of the world's most beautiful harbors. Either way, one of your first sights is the town of Charlotte Amalie. From the harbor you see an idyllic-looking village that spreads into the lower hills. If you were expecting a quiet hamlet with its inhabitants hanging out under palm trees, you've missed that era by about 300 years. Although other islands in the USVI developed plantation economies, St. Thomas cultivated its harbor, and it became a thriving seaport soon after it was settled by the Danish in the 1600s. The success of the naturally perfect harbor was enhanced by the fact that the Danes—who ruled St. Thomas with only a couple of short interruptions from 1666 to 1917—avoided involvement in some 100 years' worth of European wars. Denmark was the only European country with colonies in the Caribbean to stay neutral during the War of the Spanish Succession in the early 1700s. Thus, products of the Dutch, English, and French islands—sugar, cotton, and indigo—were traded through Charlotte Amalie, along with the regular shipments of slaves. When the Spanish wars ended, trade fell off, but by the end of the 1700s Europe was at war again, Denmark again remained neutral, and St. Thomas continued to prosper. Even into the 1800s, while the economies of St. Croix and St. John foundered with the market for sugarcane, St. Thomas's economy remained vigorous. This prosperity led to the development of shipyards, a well-organized banking system, and a large merchant class. In 1845 Charlotte Amalie had 101 large importing houses owned by the English, French, Germans, Haitians, Spaniards, Americans, Sephardim, and Danes. Charlotte Amalie is still one of the world's most active cruise-ship ports. On almost any day at least one and sometimes as many as eight cruise ships are tied to the docks or anchored outside the harbor. Gently rocking in the shadows of these giant floating hotels are just about every other kind of vessel imaginable: sleek sailing catamarans that will take you on a sunset cruise complete with rum punch and a Jimmy Buffett soundtrack, private megayachts for billionaires, and barnacle-bottom sloops—with laundry draped over the lifelines—that are home to world-cruising gypsies. Huge container ships pull up in Sub Base, west of the harbor, bringing in everything from breakfast cereals to tires. Anchored right along the waterfront are down-island barges that ply the waters between the Greater Antilles and the Leeward Islands, transporting goods such as refrigerators, VCRs, and disposable diapers. The waterfront road through Charlotte Amalie was once part of the harbor. Before it was filled in to build the highway, the beach came right up to the back door of the warehouses that now line the thoroughfare. Two hundred years ago those warehouses were filled with indigo, tobacco, and cotton. Today the stone buildings house silk, crystal, and diamonds. Exotic fragrances are still traded, but by island beauty queens in air-conditioned perfume palaces instead of through open market stalls. The pirates of old used St. Thomas as a base from which to raid merchant ships of every nation, though they were particularly fond of the gold- and silver-laden treasure ships heading to Spain. Pirates are still around, but today's versions use St. Thomas as a drop-off for their contraband: illegal immigrants and drugs. To explore outside Charlotte Amalie, rent a car or hire a taxi. Your rental car should come with a good map; if not, pick up the pocket-size "St. Thomas–St. John Road Map" at a tourist information center. Roads are marked with route numbers, but they're confusing and seem to switch numbers suddenly. Roads are also identified by signs bearing the St. Thomas–St. John Hotel and Tourism Association's mascot, Tommy the Starfish. More than 100 of these color-coded signs line the island's main routes. Orange signs trace the route from the airport to Red Hook, green signs identify the road from town to Magens Bay, Tommy's face on a yellow background points from Mafolie to Crown Bay through the north side, red signs lead from Smith Bay to Four Corners via Skyline Drive, and blue signs mark the route from the cruise-ship dock at Havensight to Red Hook. These color-coded routes are not marked on most visitor maps, however. Allow yourself a day to explore, especially if you want to stop to take pictures or to enjoy a light bite or refreshing swim. Most gas stations are on the island's more populated eastern end, so fill up before heading to the north side. And remember to drive on the left!
Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis image
Day 6
Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Dominica, Dominica image
Day 7
Dominica, Dominica

Nicknamed ‘nature island’, Dominica is 290 square miles of towering mountains, thriving rainforests and rushing waterfalls. The country is a haven for outdoorsy types seeking their next thrill in nature, while the capital offers the complete opposite. Downtown Roseau is the place to find museums, a beautiful botanic garden, and the city’s thriving arts scene in addition to mouthwatering cuisine along a cruise to Dominica. Also known as a hidden gem in terms of culture and history, the island has plenty of untold stories of an indigenous group called the Kalinago ready for you to discover.

Bridgetown, Barbados image
Day 8
Bridgetown, Barbados
Located beside the island’s only natural harbour, the capital of Barbados combines modern and colonial architecture with glorious palm tree-lined beaches and a number of historical attractions. Experience the relaxed culture of the city renowned for its British-style parliament buildings and vibrant beach life, and seek out the Anglican church and the 19th-century Barbados Garrison. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.
Castries, Saint Lucia image
Day 9
Castries, Saint Lucia
The typical image of a lush tropical paradise comes to life on the friendly island of St Lucia. Despite its small size – just 27 miles long and 14 miles wide – St Lucia is rich in natural splendour with dense emerald rainforest, banana plantations and orchards of coconut, mango and papaya trees. The twin peaks of Les Pitons, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site rise dramatically 2,000 feet into the sky and dominate the island. Look out for unusual birds with brilliant plumage such as the St Lucia parrot, see a surprising diversity of exotic flora and enjoy the warm hospitality of the islanders in the small villages and open-air markets. Please be aware that St Lucia is a small, mountainous island, with steep, winding and bumpy roads. Customers with back and neck problems should take this into consideration when booking an excursion.
Sint Maarten, Sint Maarten (Dutch part) image
Day 10
Sint Maarten, Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
New York, New York, United States image
Day 14
New York, New York, United States
From Wall Street's skyscrapers to the neon of Times Square to Central Park's leafy paths, New York City pulses with an irrepressible energy. History meets hipness in this global center of entertainment, fashion, media, and finance. World-class museums like MoMA and unforgettable icons like the Statue of Liberty beckon, but discovering the subtler strains of New York's vast ambition is equally rewarding: ethnic enclaves and shops, historic streets of dignified brownstones, and trendy bars and eateries all add to the urban buzz.
Southampton, England image
Day 21
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Ship Details
Cunard Line
Queen Mary 2

Queen Mary 2 is a remarkable flagship, her style and elegance are legendary. Above all, it‘s the space she offers and the luxury for you to do as little or as much as you wish which sets her apart.

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