7 nights onboard Marina

Iberian Illumination

Timelessly sophisticated, Marina was designed for the ultimate epicurean. She embraces the elegant ambiance of our renowned 1,238-guest ships while also offering an array of amenities and choices. In addition to multiple open-seating gourmet restaurants, Marina features memorable food and wine experiences at La Reserve by Wine Spectator as well as the opportunity for private dining at exclusive Privée. From the sparkling Lalique Grand Staircase to the Owner's Suites furnished in Ralph Lauren Home, designer touches are everywhere, highlighting the finest residential design and furnishings. More than anything, Marina personifies the Oceania Cruises experience.Yet remarkably, with so many additions, the onboard ambiance and experience remains comfortably familiar. We have retained everything our guests adore about our ships and raised the bar even higher. We look forward to welcoming you aboard.

Leaving from: Lisbon
Cruise ship: Marina
Visiting: Lisbon Huelva Tangier Melilla
Oceania Cruises Logo
Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

1238
Passengers
776
Crew
2011
Launched
2023
Last refit
66086t
Tonnage
236.7m
Length
32.1m
Width
20kts
Speed
11
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Lisbon, Portugal
Day 2
Huelva, Spain
Day 3
Tangier, Morocco
Day 4
Melilla, Spain
Day 5
Alicante, Spain
Day 6
Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Day 7
Marseille, France
Day 8
Barcelona, Spain
Lisbon, Portugal image
Day 1
Lisbon, Portugal

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Huelva, Spain image
Day 2
Huelva, Spain
Tangier, Morocco image
Day 3
Tangier, Morocco
Tangier can trace its origins back to the Phoenicians and ancient Greeks. It was named after Tinge, the mother of Hercules’ son, and its beginnings are embedded in mythology. It was subsequently a Roman province, and after Vandal and Byzantine influences, was occupied by the Arabs with Spain, Portugal, France and England also playing a part in the city’s history. With such a diverse past it is perhaps not surprising that Tangier is such an individual city. Overlooking the Straits of Gibraltar, the city lies on a bay between two promontories. With its old Kasbah, panoramic views, elegant buildings, squares and places of interest, there is much to discover in both the new and old parts of the city.
Melilla, Spain image
Day 4
Melilla, Spain
The autonomous city of Melilla is a Spanish enclave located on the Mediterranean Rif coast of North Africa, bordering Morocco. Its chequered past embraced periods of Phoenician, Punic, Roman and Byzantine rule before it was conquered by Spain in 1497. The latter part of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century saw hostilities between Rif berbers and the Spanish, with the latter finally reinstating their control in 1927. The city was used by General Franco as one of the staging points for the rebellion of 1936. As part of the Spanish protectorate, Melilla developed the architectural style of 'Modernisme', the Catalan version of Art Nouveau, and boasts the second most important concentration of Modernist works in Spain, after Barcelona.
Alicante, Spain image
Day 5
Alicante, Spain
The provincial capital of the Valencian Community serves as a gateway to the huge influx of tourists that flock to the Costa Blanca resorts every year. Alicante is popular with holidaymakers who arrive for the warm, Mediterranean climate and seemingly endless golden beaches. However, there is much more to this city than sand and sun. With a picturesque waterfront, a hugely impressive castle, buzzing nightlife and a rich, complex history, Alicante is a fascinating destination all year round.
Palma de Mallorca, Spain image
Day 6
Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Palma de Mallorca, the largest city on the island of Mallorca, is the capital of Spain’s Balearic Islands and a popular destination among Mediterranean cruisers. The sun-kissed island combines a vibrant city centre and shopping areas with a charming old town, known in Spanish as El Casco Antiguo, where many tourist hotspots can be found. With stunning views allied to great beaches, Gothic, Moorish and Renaissance architecture, as well as tasty regional food, Palma ticks all the boxes.

Marseille, France image
Day 7
Marseille, France
Since being designated a European Capital of Culture for 2013, with an estimated €660 million of funding in the bargain, Marseille has been in the throes of an extraordinary transformation, with no fewer than five major new arts centers, a beautifully refurbished port, revitalized neighborhoods, and a slew of new shops and restaurants. Once the underdog, this time-burnished city is now welcoming an influx of weekend tourists who have colonized entire neighborhoods and transformed them into elegant pieds-à-terre (or should we say, mer). The second-largest city in France, Marseille is one of Europe's most vibrant destinations. Feisty and fond of broad gestures, it is also as complicated and as cosmopolitan now as it was when a band of Phoenician Greeks first sailed into the harbor that is today's Vieux Port in 600 BC. Legend has it that on that same day a local chieftain's daughter, Gyptis, needed to choose a husband, and her wandering eyes settled on the Greeks' handsome commander Protis. Her dowry brought land near the mouth of the Rhône, where the Greeks founded Massalia, the most important Continental shipping port in antiquity. The port flourished for some 500 years as a typical Greek city, enjoying the full flush of classical culture, its gods, its democratic political system, its sports and theater, and its naval prowess. Caesar changed all that, besieging the city in 49 BC and seizing most of its colonies. In 1214 Marseille was seized again, this time by Charles d'Anjou, and was later annexed to France by Henri IV in 1481, but it was not until Louis XIV took the throne that the biggest transformations of the port began; he pulled down the city walls in 1666 and expanded the port to the Rive Neuve (New Riverbank). The city was devastated by plague in 1720, losing more than half its population. By the time of the Revolution, Marseille was on the rebound once again, with industries of soap manufacturing and oil processing flourishing, encouraging a wave of immigration from Provence and Italy. With the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, Marseille became the greatest boomtown in 19th-century Europe. With a large influx of immigrants from areas as exotic as Tangiers, the city quickly acquired the multicultural population it maintains to this day.
Barcelona, Spain image
Day 8
Barcelona, Spain
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Marina

Timelessly sophisticated, Marina was designed for the ultimate epicurean. She embraces the elegant ambiance of our renowned 1,238-guest ships while also offering an array of amenities and choices. In addition to multiple open-seating gourmet restaurants, Marina features memorable food and wine experiences at La Reserve by Wine Spectator as well as the opportunity for private dining at exclusive Privée. From the sparkling Lalique Grand Staircase to the Owner's Suites furnished in Ralph Lauren Home, designer touches are everywhere, highlighting the finest residential design and furnishings. More than anything, Marina personifies the Oceania Cruises experience.Yet remarkably, with so many additions, the onboard ambiance and experience remains comfortably familiar. We have retained everything our guests adore about our ships and raised the bar even higher. We look forward to welcoming you aboard.

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