11 nights onboard MSC Divina

United States, Jamaica, Aruba, Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, Honduras

Inspired by Sophia Loren, MSC Divina brings you all the elegance and glamour of the golden age of cruise lines, enhanced by modern, eco-friendly technology. On board you’ll find every modern comfort, along with a variety of sports and leisure facilities as well as world-class entertainment, including kids’ and teens’ clubs to ensure everyone’s happy. Also, MSC Divina is one of the ships that sail to our exclusive Bahamian destination Ocean Cay MSC Marine Reserve.

Leaving from: Miami, Florida
Cruise ship: MSC Divina
Visiting: Miami, Florida Ocho Rios Oranjestad Cartagena
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MSC Cruises

MSC Cruises may be headquartered in Switzerland, but the ambience onboard its 23 ships is very much Italian owing to its owners, the Aponte family.

Ships feature a two-storey Mediterranean-style promenade and Instagram-worthy glass staircases filled with Swarovski crystals.

The line’s flagship is the 6,327 passenger MSC Euribia, which is MSC's second ship to run on liquefied natural gas.

4345
Passengers
1388
Crew
2012
Launched
2017
Last refit
139072t
Tonnage
333.3m
Length
37.92m
Width
23kts
Speed
14
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Day 3
Ocho Rios, Jamaica
Day 5
Oranjestad, Aruba
Day 6
Cartagena, Colombia
Day 7
Colón, Panama
Day 8
Puerto Limón, Costa Rica
Day 10
Roatán Island, Honduras
Day 12
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
Ocho Rios, Jamaica image
Day 3
Ocho Rios, Jamaica
Oranjestad, Aruba image
Day 5
Oranjestad, Aruba
Aruba's capital is easily explored on foot. Its palm-lined central thoroughfare runs between old and new pastel-painted buildings of typical Dutch design (Spanish influence is also evident in some of the architecture). There are a lot of malls with boutiques and shops—the Renaissance mall carries high-end luxury items and designer fashions. A massive renovation in downtown has given Main Street (a.k.a. Caya G. F. Betico Croes) behind the Renaissance Resort a whole new lease on life: boutique malls, shops, and restaurants have opened next to well-loved family-run businesses. The pedestrian-only walkway and resting areas have unclogged the street, and the new eco-trolley is free and a great way to get around. At this writing, Linear Park was well and will showcase local merchants and artists. There will be activities along a boardwalk that will eventually run all the way to the end of Palm Beach, making it the longest of its kind in the Caribbean.
Cartagena, Colombia image
Day 6
Cartagena, Colombia
Cartagena's magnificent city walls and fortresses, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, enclose a well-restored historic center (the Cuidad Amurallada, or walled city) with plazas, churches, museums, and shops that have made it a lively coastal vacation spot for South Americans and others. New hotels and restaurants make the walled city a desirable place to stay, and the formerly down-at-the-heels Getsemaní neighborhood attracts those seeking a bohemian buzz. The historic center is a small section of Cartagena; many hotels are in the Bocagrande district, an elongated peninsula where high-rise hotels overlook a long, gray-sand beach.When it was founded in 1533 by Spanish conquistador Pedro de Heredia, Cartagena was the only port on the South American mainland. Gold and silver looted from indigenous peoples passed through here en route to Spain and attracted pirates, including Sir Francis Drake, who in 1586 torched 200 buildings. Cartagena's walls protected the city's riches as well as the New World's most important African slave market.
Colón, Panama image
Day 7
Colón, Panama
The provincial capital of Colón, beside the canal's Atlantic entrance, is named for the Spanish-language surname of Christopher Columbus, though the Americans called it Aspinwall in the 19th century.. The city was founded in 1850 by Americans working on the Panama railroad and named Aspinwall for one of the railway engineers. Following completion in 1855, Colon gained in importance, which was furthered by the plans for an isthmian canal. During the time of the French canal attempt, a fire in 1885 burned the city nearly to the ground and left thousands of people homeless. Colon was rebuilt in the architectural style then popular in France. Buildings from that era plus the ones constructed by Americans between 1904 and 1914 are still in use today, although the majority is on the verge of collapse. In addition to its importance as a port, Colon boasts the world’s second largest duty-free zone, known as Zona Libre, which is contained in a huge fortress like, walled-off area with giant international stores. However, most of the merchandise is sold in bulk to commercial businesses throughout the country.
Puerto Limón, Costa Rica image
Day 8
Puerto Limón, Costa Rica
Christopher Columbus became Costa Rica's first tourist when he landed on this stretch of coast in 1502 during his fourth and final voyage to the New World. Expecting to find vast mineral wealth, he named the region Costa Rica ("rich coast"). Imagine the Spaniards' surprise eventually to find there was none. Save for a brief skirmish some six decades ago, the country did prove itself rich in a long tradition of peace and democracy. No other country in Latin America can make that claim. Costa Rica is also abundantly rich in natural beauty, managing to pack beaches, volcanoes, rain forests, and diverse animal life into an area the size of Vermont and New Hampshire combined. It has successfully parlayed those qualities into its role as one the world's great ecotourism destinations. A day visit is short, but time enough for a quick sample.
Roatán Island, Honduras image
Day 10
Roatán Island, Honduras
Experience true Caribbean island bliss, during your time on the immaculate paradise of Roatan, which is the largest of the Bay Islands. This slim island is framed by glorious powdery white beaches, and rich ocean beds carpeted with diverse coral reefs - alive with fish and marine life. Curious dolphins roll through the waves just offshore, while beach dwellers soak up the sun, and enjoy coconut cocktails, beside leaning palm trees. The beaches here are nothing short of dreamy - with wooden piers teetering out over the water, and thatched roofs providing welcome shade, as you dangle your legs towards the water.
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 12
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
Ship Details
MSC Cruises
MSC Divina

Inspired by Sophia Loren, MSC Divina brings you all the elegance and glamour of the golden age of cruise lines, enhanced by modern, eco-friendly technology. On board you’ll find every modern comfort, along with a variety of sports and leisure facilities as well as world-class entertainment, including kids’ and teens’ clubs to ensure everyone’s happy. Also, MSC Divina is one of the ships that sail to our exclusive Bahamian destination Ocean Cay MSC Marine Reserve.

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