14 nights onboard Sirena

North Atlantic Adventure

The better-than-new Sirena blends sophistication with a contemporary flair to create a casually elegant ambiance that embodies the most treasured elements of our celebrated ships. Every surface of every suite and stateroom is entirely new, while in the public spaces, a refreshed colour palette of soft sea and sky tones surrounds a tasteful renewal of fabrics, furnishings and lighting fixtures that exquisitely encompasses the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises.

Leaving from: Reykjavík
Cruise ship: Sirena
Visiting: Reykjavík Isafjørdur Nuuk (Godthaab) Paamiut (Fredrikshaab)
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Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

648
Passengers
400
Crew
1999
Launched
2019
Last refit
30277t
Tonnage
181m
Length
25.45m
Width
18kts
Speed
9
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Day 2
Isafjørdur, Iceland
Days 3 - 4
River travel
Day 5
Nuuk (Godthaab), Greenland
Day 6
Paamiut (Fredrikshaab), Greenland
Day 7
Qaqortoq (Julianehaab), Greenland
Days 8 - 10
River travel
Day 11
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Day 12
Scrabster, Scotland
Day 13
Aberdeen, Scotland
Days 14 - 15
Leith, Scotland
Reykjavík, Iceland image
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.
Isafjørdur, Iceland image
Day 2
Isafjørdur, Iceland
Two colossal terraces of sheer rock stand either side of this extraordinarily located town - which rides a jutting spit onto an immensity of black fjord water. Surprisingly, considering the remoteness of its location and its compact size, Isafjordur is a modern and lively place to visit, offering a great choice of cafes and delicious restaurants – which are well stocked to impress visitors. The town is a perfectly located base for adventures amongst Iceland's fantastic wilderness - with skiing, hiking and water-sports popular pursuits among visitors.
River travel image
Days 3 - 4
River travel
Nuuk (Godthaab), Greenland image
Day 5
Nuuk (Godthaab), Greenland
Near the Port of Nuuk, serving Greenland's vibrant capital, visitors can enjoy a variety of engaging activities. Explore the Nuuk Art Museum and the Greenland National Museum to delve into the rich cultural heritage and history of the island. For outdoor enthusiasts, hiking the nearby trails offers stunning views of the fjords and rugged landscapes. Boat tours from the port provide close encounters with icebergs and an opportunity to spot whales. Additionally, tasting local cuisine, especially fresh seafood, in Nuuk's restaurants gives a flavor of the Arctic. The colorful buildings and friendly locals add to the charm of exploring this unique Arctic city.
Paamiut (Fredrikshaab), Greenland image
Day 6
Paamiut (Fredrikshaab), Greenland
Qaqortoq (Julianehaab), Greenland image
Day 7
Qaqortoq (Julianehaab), Greenland
Qaqortoq, one of Greenland's most charming towns, is renowned for its vibrant, colorful houses that brighten the rugged landscape. This southern town boasts a rich history, evident in its well-preserved 18th-century buildings, including the oldest fountain in Greenland. Qaqortoq stands out for its unique outdoor art project, "Stone and Man," where over 40 sculptures are carved directly into the town's rock faces and boulders, blending culture with nature. The town is surrounded by stunning natural beauty, from nearby hot springs to panoramic views ideal for hiking. Qaqortoq's blend of historical significance, cultural richness, and natural beauty makes it a must-visit destination in Greenland.
River travel image
Days 8 - 10
River travel
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands image
Day 11
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Scrabster, Scotland image
Day 12
Scrabster, Scotland
Aberdeen, Scotland image
Day 13
Aberdeen, Scotland
With close to 220,000 inhabitants, Aberdeen is Scotland's third most populous city. Locally quarried grey granite was used during the mid-18th to mid-20th centuries for many of Aberdeen's buildings, and hence the nicknames it has earned as the Granite City, or the Grey City. Aberdeen granite was also used to build the terraces of the Houses of Parliament and Waterloo Bridge in London. Since the discovery of North Sea oil in the 1970s, Aberdeen has also been called the Oil Capital of Europe or the Energy Capital of Europe. It is no wonder that because of the oil fields in the North Sea, Aberdeen's seaport is very important. The Heliport with its flights to the oil fields is one of the busiest commercial heliports in the world.
Leith, Scotland image
Days 14 - 15
Leith, Scotland
At the Port of Leith, Scotland's maritime heritage comes to life, echoing with tales of exploration and trade that have shaped the nation's identity. Here, amidst the bracing sea air and rugged coastline, cruisegoers discover an authentic Scottish experience. Unlike the crowded tourist hubs, Leith offers an intimate encounter with the soul of Scotland. Its maritime climate, with crisp sea breezes and dramatic skies, sets the stage for adventure. Visitors can wander through the historic streets, lined with centuries-old buildings that whisper stories of bygone eras. And for a taste of local flavor, Leith's bustling markets serve up fresh seafood delights straight from the North Sea, a true culinary delight not to be missed.
Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Sirena

The better-than-new Sirena blends sophistication with a contemporary flair to create a casually elegant ambiance that embodies the most treasured elements of our celebrated ships. Every surface of every suite and stateroom is entirely new, while in the public spaces, a refreshed colour palette of soft sea and sky tones surrounds a tasteful renewal of fabrics, furnishings and lighting fixtures that exquisitely encompasses the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises.

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