18 nights onboard Greg Mortimer

Northern Lights Explorer

Winners 2022 Best Expedition Cruise Line

Shorter days in the high latitudes means darkening evening skies, so on this voyage we stay close to the coastlines of the Arctic Circle, skirting around the Norwegian and Greenland seas, and exploring remote islands and villages of the region. As night falls, we look skywards hoping to catch the magic of the northern lights. Scientifically known as the aurora borealis, this spectacular natural phenomenon offers a surreal light display as vibrant hues of blue, green, pink and violet dance across the night sky. Places located near the Arctic Circle such as northern Norway, Iceland and Greenland, are some of the best places in the world to witness this stunning light show.

Leaving from: Kirkenes
Cruise ship: Greg Mortimer
Visiting: Kirkenes Kirkenes Norwegian Fjords Norwegian Fjords
AE Expeditions Logo
AE Expeditions

AE Expeditions is a small Australian cruise line which specialises in off-the-beaten-track voyages led by remote area experts.

The company’s adventurous co-founders, Greg and Margaret Mortimer, established AE Expeditions in 1991 and had by the following year, already begun running voyages to Antarctica

132
Passengers
74
Crew
2019
Launched
7400t
Tonnage
104.4m
Length
18.2m
Width
12kts
Speed
8
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Days 1 - 2
Kirkenes, Norway
Days 3 - 6
Norwegian Fjords, Norway
Day 8
Jan Mayen Island, Norway
Days 10 - 17
River travel
Day 19
Reykjavík, Iceland
Kirkenes, Norway image
Days 1 - 2
Kirkenes, Norway
Kirkenes is a small town in the North-East of Norway, bordering both Russia and Finland, located only 250 miles away from the Arctic Circle. Known for its wildlife, beautiful scenery and winter sports activities, Kirkenes has a kind of fantastical charm.
Norwegian Fjords, Norway image
Days 3 - 6
Norwegian Fjords, Norway
Jan Mayen Island, Norway image
Day 8
Jan Mayen Island, Norway
Described as one of the most remote islands in the world, Jan Mayen liesbetween Norway to the east and Greenland to the west. It is a rugged volcanicisland 34 miles long and is made up of two parts – the larger section to thenorth (Beerenbeg Volcano) and the longer but narrower section to the south. Amile-wide isthmus links these two parts. Geologically, the island was formed bya ‘hotspot’ where molten magma pushes up through the earth’s crust to createvolcanoes in the middle of nowhere. Politically, Jan Mayen is an integral partof Norway. The eighteen people living on the island work for either the NorwegianArmed Forces or the Norwegian Meteorological Institute. Their main purpose isto operate the Loran-C radio navigation system. From 1615 to 1638, the Dutchran a whaling station here. Today, the island is a nature reserve underNorwegian jurisdiction aimed at preserving the pristine Arctic island and themarine life, including the ocean floor.
River travel image
Days 10 - 17
River travel
Reykjavík, Iceland image
Day 19
Reykjavík, Iceland
Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.
Ship Details
AE Expeditions
Greg Mortimer

We drew on centuries of collective experience to map out the Greg Mortimer: purpose-built for expeditions to the most remote places on earth.

Find your perfect cruise!
Cabins
All Prices