12 nights onboard Marina

Northern Vistas

Timelessly sophisticated, Marina was designed for the ultimate epicurean. She embraces the elegant ambiance of our renowned 1,238-guest ships while also offering an array of amenities and choices. In addition to multiple open-seating gourmet restaurants, Marina features memorable food and wine experiences at La Reserve by Wine Spectator as well as the opportunity for private dining at exclusive Privée. From the sparkling Lalique Grand Staircase to the Owner's Suites furnished in Ralph Lauren Home, designer touches are everywhere, highlighting the finest residential design and furnishings. More than anything, Marina personifies the Oceania Cruises experience.Yet remarkably, with so many additions, the onboard ambiance and experience remains comfortably familiar. We have retained everything our guests adore about our ships and raised the bar even higher. We look forward to welcoming you aboard.

Leaving from: Reykjavík
Cruise ship: Marina
Visiting: Reykjavík Heimaey Island Eskifjørdur Tórshavn
Oceania Cruises Logo
Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

1238
Passengers
776
Crew
2011
Launched
2023
Last refit
66086t
Tonnage
236.7m
Length
32.1m
Width
20kts
Speed
11
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Day 2
Heimaey Island, Iceland
Day 3
Eskifjørdur, Iceland
Day 4
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Day 5
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
Day 6
River travel
Day 7
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Day 8
Dun Laoghaire, Ireland
Day 9
Holyhead, Wales
Day 10
Cobh, Ireland
Day 11
Isle of Portland, England
Day 12
Saint-Malo, France
Day 13
Southampton, England
Reykjavík, Iceland image
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.
Heimaey Island, Iceland image
Day 2
Heimaey Island, Iceland
It’s hard to imagine, as you stroll Heimaey’s idyllic streets of white wooden houses, that this island was literally torn apart by a spectacular volcanic eruption, just over 40 years ago. The fact that you can visit incredible Heimaey at all is something of a miracle – because the oozing lava of the Eldfell volcano threatened to seal the harbour off completely. Fortunately, its advance was halted by gallons of seawater, pumped onto it by the plucky islanders, who saved their fishing industry in the process. Iceland's famous for its scenery, and the huge castles of volcanic rock that rise out of the sea's waves here are some of the country's most dramatic.
Eskifjørdur, Iceland image
Day 3
Eskifjørdur, Iceland
A charming fishing village and port in the middle of Iceland's eastern fjords, Eskifjörður is surrounded by a spectacular panorama of glaciers, icebergs, volcanoes and waterfalls accessible via land and boat. Two mountains, Eskja and Hólmatindur, dominate the fjord; Hólmatindur is renowned by locals as the most beautiful mountain in the vicinity. In 1786, Eskifjörður was established as an official trading post and has been a commercial centre since 1798. In 1998, Eskifjörður joined Neskaupstaður and Reyðarfjörður to form the new municipality of Fjarðabyggð, or 'fjords-settlement'. Since village culture and industry has been shaped by the sea, a stroll through Eskifjörður is recommended. Along the way, historical buildings, piers and the Maritime Museum offer a splendid look at the vestiges of the town's seafaring history, as does the Randulfssjóhús Lodge, unchanged since 1890. You can taste the shark and dried fish still produced here utilizing traditional methods observed for generations, or set sail around the picturesque fjord and try your hand at fishing the teeming coastal waters. Eskifjörður's geology is especially notable for producing some of the most beautiful and exquisite stones in existence. Some of the world's largest spar crystals have been excavated from one of the most famous spar mines along the coast, and thousands of polished, cut and original stones from all over the island are displayed in the Sören & Sigurborg Stone Museum, and the Petra Collection in Stöðvarfjörður. Due to its compact size, Eskifjörður can be easily explored in just a single day.
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands image
Day 4
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland image
Day 5
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.
River travel image
Day 6
River travel
Belfast, Northern Ireland image
Day 7
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.
Dun Laoghaire, Ireland image
Day 8
Dun Laoghaire, Ireland
Holyhead, Wales image
Day 9
Holyhead, Wales
Once a northern defense post against Irish raiders, Holyhead later became best known as a ferry port for Ireland. The dockside bustle is not matched by the town, however, which maintains just a small population. Nonetheless, thousands of years of settlement have given Holyhead rich historical ruins to explore, with more in the surrounding hiking friendly landscape.
Cobh, Ireland image
Day 10
Cobh, Ireland

The last port of call on the Titanic’s ill-fated voyage, the seaside town on Ireland’s south coast has a historic maritime legacy. One of the major transatlantic Irish ports, Cobh (pronounced ‘Cove’ and formerly known as Queenstown) was also the departure point for 2.5 million of the six million Irish people who emigrated to North America between 1848 and 1950. While visitors flock to Cobh to learn about its fascinating maritime and emigration history, they will also find the picturesque town blessed with a beautiful cathedral and a burgeoning bar and restaurant scene.

Isle of Portland, England image
Day 11
Isle of Portland, England
The Isle of Portland is a tied island, 6 kilometres long by 2.7 kilometres wide, in the English Channel. The southern tip, Portland Bill lies 8 kilometres south of the resort of Weymouth, forming the southernmost point of the county of Dorset, England. A barrier beach called Chesil Beach joins it to the mainland.
Saint-Malo, France image
Day 12
Saint-Malo, France
Thrust out into the sea and bound to the mainland only by tenuous man-made causeways, romantic St-Malo has built a reputation as a breeding ground for phenomenal sailors. Many were fishermen, but others—most notably Jacques Cartier, who claimed Canada for Francis I in 1534—were New World explorers. Still others were corsairs, "sea dogs" paid by the French crown to harass the Limeys across the Channel: legendary ones like Robert Surcouf and Duguay-Trouin helped make St-Malo rich through their pillaging, in the process earning it the nickname "the pirates' city." The St-Malo you see today isn’t quite the one they called home because a weeklong fire in 1944, kindled by retreating Nazis, wiped out nearly all of the old buildings. Restoration work was more painstaking than brilliant, but the narrow streets and granite houses of the Vieille Ville were satisfactorily recreated, enabling St-Malo to regain its role as a busy fishing port, seaside resort, and tourist destination. The ramparts that help define this city figuratively and literally are authentic, and the flames also spared houses along Rue de Pelicot in the Vieille Ville. Battalions of tourists invade this quaint part of town in summer, so arrive off-season if you want to avoid crowds.
Southampton, England image
Day 13
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Marina

Timelessly sophisticated, Marina was designed for the ultimate epicurean. She embraces the elegant ambiance of our renowned 1,238-guest ships while also offering an array of amenities and choices. In addition to multiple open-seating gourmet restaurants, Marina features memorable food and wine experiences at La Reserve by Wine Spectator as well as the opportunity for private dining at exclusive Privée. From the sparkling Lalique Grand Staircase to the Owner's Suites furnished in Ralph Lauren Home, designer touches are everywhere, highlighting the finest residential design and furnishings. More than anything, Marina personifies the Oceania Cruises experience.Yet remarkably, with so many additions, the onboard ambiance and experience remains comfortably familiar. We have retained everything our guests adore about our ships and raised the bar even higher. We look forward to welcoming you aboard.

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