14 nights onboard Ambition

Norway's Land of the Northern Lights

A Norwegian sailing is more than just icy waters and exploring mountainous terrain, it's a destination of discovery and imagination. You’ll stop at some of the most picturesque ports and some of the most sought-after destinations. Explore Tromso, one of the best places in the world to catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights as they dance in hues of pink and green right before your eyes. Trondheim, known as the 'home of Nordic flavours', is a city that inspires, and Alta is sure to take your breath away.

Leaving from: Dundee
Cruise ship: Ambition
Visiting: Dundee Ålesund Trondheim Tromsø
Ambassador Cruise Line Logo
Ambassador Cruise Line

Ambassador Cruise Line describes itself as a "premium value" service, offering value-for-money breaks aimed primarily at the over-50s.

The company, based in Essex, first sailed out of Tilbury in 2022, with its first Ambassador ship - Ambience, now joined by Ambition. Guests can expect talks, a vast array of entertainment, and a healthy choice of restaurants.

The tag claims "best value at sea" - we'd be inclined to agree.

1200
Passengers
2022
Launched
41123t
Tonnage
216m
Length
29m
Width
20kts
Speed
10
Decks
GBP
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Dundee, Scotland
Day 3
Ålesund, Norway
Day 4
Trondheim, Norway
Day 6
Tromsø, Norway
Day 7
Alta, Norway
Day 9
Narvik, Norway
Day 10
Bodø, Norway
Day 12
Bergen, Norway
Day 14
Newcastle upon Tyne, England
Day 15
Dundee, Scotland
Dundee, Scotland image
Day 1
Dundee, Scotland
Found along the banks of the River Tay, Dundee beckons with a vibrant maritime past, once renowned for its shipbuilding prowess. Embraced by a moderate maritime climate, its brisk coastal winds offer a refreshing change for travelers seeking authenticity beyond the beaten path. Dundee's allure lies in its unassuming charm, where cobblestone streets lead to hidden gems like the V&A Dundee, a modern architectural marvel. This bustling city isn't just a gateway; it's a living testament to Scotland's innovation. Notably, it's the birthplace of marmalade, a sweet legacy that continues to tantalize taste buds worldwide.
Ålesund, Norway image
Day 3
Ålesund, Norway

The coastal town of Ålesund is the commercial capital of the Møre og Romsdal district. But more important, it is noted for its characteristic Jugendstil (Art Nouveau) buildings, which some claim make Ålesund one of the most beautiful towns in Norway. This Art Nouveau style emerged when the town was completely rebuilt after a devastating fire in 1904 destroyed nearly 800 buildings and left 10,000 residents homeless. It is said that the fire started by a tipped oil lamp. Rebuilding was carried out with the help of many young, foreign architects who added their own flourishes to the architectural blend of German Jugendstil and Viking roots. Today, narrow streets are crammed with buildings topped with turrets, spires and gables that bear decorations of dragonheads and curlicues. As one of the few remaining Art Nouveau towns in the world, in 1998 Ålesund was awarded the coveted Houens National Memorial Prize for the preservation of its unique architecture.

Trondheim, Norway image
Day 4
Trondheim, Norway
One of Scandinavia's oldest cities, Trondheim was the first capital of Norway, from AD 997 to 1380. Founded in 997 by Viking king Olav Tryggvason, it was first named Nidaros (still the name of the cathedral), a composite word referring to the city's location at the mouth of the Nidelva River. Today, it's Central Norway's largest (and Norway's third largest) city, with a population of 150,000. The wide streets of the historic city center remain lined with brightly painted wood houses and striking warehouses. But it's no historic relic: it's also the home to NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) and is Norway's technological capital.
Tromsø, Norway image
Day 6
Tromsø, Norway
With its centre located on the island of Tromsø, the municipality of Tromsø is more than five times the size of Norway’s capital, Oslo, and is the world’s northernmost university city. Lying 200 miles inside the Arctic Circle, it is known as the 'Gateway to the Arctic' because it was used as a starting point for hunters looking for Arctic foxes, polar bears and seals. In the 19th century it was a base for explorers on Arctic expeditions – a history that is remembered in the city’s Polar Museum, which you can visit on an excursion. Also commemorated in the area is the history of Norway’s indigenous people, the Sami. Visitors can learn about the traditions, heritage and modern preservation of the Sami culture at the Tromsø Museum. Nowadays, Tromsø is a charming mix of old and new, with wooden buildings sitting alongside contemporary architecture such as the impressive glacier-like Arctic Cathedral, which features one of the largest stained glass windows in Europe. Looking down on the city is Mount Storsteinen, and a cable car runs to the top, giving wonderful views over the surrounding countryside of forested peaks and reindeer pastures.
Alta, Norway image
Day 7
Alta, Norway

Also known as the ‘City of the Northern Lights’, Norway’s northern coastal town is regarded as one of the best places in the world to view the natural phenomenon known as aurora borealis. Originally inhabited by the indigenous Sami people, Alta has a rich cultural heritage, home to the Unesco-listed site of Hjemmeluft, which features prehistoric rock carvings dating from around 4,200 to 500 BC. Like several other northern Norway towns, much of Alta had to be rebuilt after WWII and the town is now a fascinating blend of old and new, with notable modern buildings including the Northern Lights Cathedral.

Narvik, Norway image
Day 9
Narvik, Norway
At 68 degrees North, Narvik lies 140 miles inside the Arctic Circle. Its history as a settlement began in the Stone Age, and Vikings are also known to have lived in the area. The modern town came into existence in the 1870s to serve the needs of the iron industry. Iron ore is mined in neighbouring Sweden and, as an ice-free port, Narvik was chosen as the ideal export location. The LKAB mining corporation is still a major employer and landowner in the area, shipping some 25,000,000 tons of iron ore from the port annually. This industrial heritage has shaped the town and now forms the basis of some of its most popular tourist attractions. In 1883 a co-owned British-Swedish company was given permission to build a railway connecting the Swedish iron mines in Kiruna to Narvik. It opened in 1902 and the town, then christened Victoriahavn, grew up around it. Unfortunately much of Narvik was destroyed in World War II. Invaded by the Nazis on 9 April 1940, it was later retaken by the Allies, representing the first military defeat of Hitler’s troops, but was evacuated as part of Operation Alphabet when it came under German occupation again. The local war museum documents the turbulent history of this period.
Bodø, Norway image
Day 10
Bodø, Norway
The capital of Nordland is a peaceful city, but beneath the surface lies a fascinating and colourful military past. During the Cold War it was an important NATO base, stationing fighter jets to intercept Soviet naval vessels and aircraft. The situation culminated when Premier Kruschev threatened to destroy Bodø with nuclear weapons after a CIA U-2 spy plane bound for the city was shot down over the Soviet Union. You can learn more about the city's Cold War history at the Norwegian Aviation Museum, which is uniquely designed to resemble a biplane and houses an intact U-2 plane, a Spitfire, a rare Hønningstad C-5 polar seaplane and many other interesting exhibits. As well as its military heritage, Bodø boasts the world's strongest maelstrom at Saltstraumen, which attracts a host of visitors every year.
Bergen, Norway image
Day 12
Bergen, Norway

Surrounded by mountains and sparkling fjords, the waterside city of Bergen has a spectacular setting. There has been a settlement here since medieval times and the colourful waterfront buildings of the Hanseatic wharf, known as Bryggen, are testament to its fascinating history of trade. As Norway’s best known medieval settlement, the Bryggen is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Our comprehensive selection of excursions allows you to discover the many sides of Bergen, such as the fish market and narrow cobbled streets, as well as stunning views of the city from the summit of Mt Fløyen. Alternatively, those who have visited the city previously may like to experience one of the tours that travel further afield. Just 300 yards from the main piers, you will find the Fortress Museum (Fesningsmuseum), which has an interesting collection of objects related to World War II.

Newcastle upon Tyne, England image
Day 14
Newcastle upon Tyne, England
An urban city mixing culture, sophistication and heritage, Newcatle-upon-Tyne offers a range of activities and attractions. With more theatres per person than anywhere else in the UK, Newcastle has a wide range of arts and cultural attractions for visitors to enjoy, from the Theatre Royal – regional home to the Royal Shakespeare Company – to the famous Angel of the North.
Dundee, Scotland image
Day 15
Dundee, Scotland
Found along the banks of the River Tay, Dundee beckons with a vibrant maritime past, once renowned for its shipbuilding prowess. Embraced by a moderate maritime climate, its brisk coastal winds offer a refreshing change for travelers seeking authenticity beyond the beaten path. Dundee's allure lies in its unassuming charm, where cobblestone streets lead to hidden gems like the V&A Dundee, a modern architectural marvel. This bustling city isn't just a gateway; it's a living testament to Scotland's innovation. Notably, it's the birthplace of marmalade, a sweet legacy that continues to tantalize taste buds worldwide.
Ship Details
Ambassador Cruise Line
Ambition

Here she is, Ambition. Our second lady of the sea. Aptly named to further emphasise our commitment to inspire and delight every guest to enjoy an authentic cruise experience effortlessly, and sustainably.

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