14 nights onboard Marella Explorer

Olives and Old Towns 1

You can expect the same great service, food and entertainment on every single one of our ships. They’re All Inclusive as standard, too. That said, each vessel has a personality of its own. Marella Explorer’s the biggest ship in our fleet, so it goes without saying that the facilities are first-class.

Leaving from: Santa Cruz de La Palma
Cruise ship: Marella Explorer
Visiting: Santa Cruz de La Palma Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Funchal, Madeira Gibraltar
Marella Cruises Logo
Marella Cruises

Marella Cruises – formerly Thomson Cruises - is to add a fifth ship to its fleet in 2023. Having parted with Marella Celebration and Marella Dream during the pandemic, the line is to acquire Mein Schiff Herz from the parent TUI Group and convert it into Marella Voyager.

The new addition, originally from the same Celebrity Cruises Century-Class as Marella Explorer and Explorer 2, will feature two new venues for Marella – a Mexican diner and a secret speakeasy bar.

1924
Passengers
900
Crew
1996
Launched
2018
Last refit
76998t
Tonnage
264m
Length
32m
Width
21kts
Speed
13
Decks
GBP
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Santa Cruz de La Palma, Spain
Day 2
Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
Day 4
Funchal, Madeira, Portugal
Day 6
Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Day 7
Motril, Spain
Day 9
Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Day 11
Cagliari, Italy
Day 13
Valletta, Malta
Day 15
Corfu, Greece
Santa Cruz de La Palma, Spain image
Day 1
Santa Cruz de La Palma, Spain
Also known as ‘La Isla Bonita’ (the beautiful island), La Palma is typified by lush forests of pine, laurel and fern which contrast with the rugged splendour of the gigantic Taburiente crater. The island is dotted with attractive villages, which are a delight to discover, and the capital Santa Cruz also makes for an interesting day of exploration. Perched on the edge of the volcanic crater of La Caldereta, Santa Cruz comfortably blends modern architecture with old colonial buildings. Perhaps visit the fascinating Natural History Museum, stroll around the historic quarters and the Plaza de Espana or travel a few miles outside the city to the exquisite Church of Our Lady. If you enjoy shopping, you can find reasonably priced silver jewellery, leather goods and beautifully embroidered clothes, tablecloths and napkins, a speciality of the Canary Islands.
Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain image
Day 2
Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
Perhaps the prettiest of the Canary Islands, Gran Canaria is an almost circular isle with the peak of Pozo de Las Nieves, its highest point, at the centre. With a wealth of natural beauty and all the exciting attractions of city life in the capital, the island offers the best of both worlds. You will no doubt wish to see the sights of the capital’s old quarter, which dates back to the 15th century and encompassses the Vegueta and Triana districts, and wherever you go you can enjoy the glorious subtropical climate, perfect for growing exotic palms and fruits.
Funchal, Madeira, Portugal image
Day 4
Funchal, Madeira, Portugal
Formed by a volcanic eruption, Madeira lies in the Gulf Stream, about 500 miles due west of Casablanca. Discovered by Portuguese explorer João Gonçalves Zarco in 1419, this beautiful island became part of Portugal’s vast empire and was named for the dense forest which cloaked it - 'Madeira' means 'wood' in Portuguese. Sugar plantations first brought wealth here, and when King Charles II of England granted an exclusive franchise to sell wine to England and its colonies, many British emigrants were drawn to the capital, Funchal. Today’s travellers come to Madeira for the varied and luxuriant scenery, from mountain slopes covered with vines to picturesque villages and a profusion of wild flowers. The natural beauty of the island has earned it many pseudonyms such as ‘The Floating Garden of the Atlantic’, 'The Island of Eternal Springtime' and ‘God’s Botanical Gardens’ and our selection of excursions aim to show you why.
Gibraltar, Gibraltar image
Day 6
Gibraltar, Gibraltar

Tagged on to the end of Iberia, the intriguing British outpost of Gibraltar is dominated by a sandy peninsula and the stunning 1,400-feet-high limestone Rock. Although small, Gibraltar has always been seen as having great strategic importance on account of its advantageous position where the Atlantic meets the Mediterranean, just 12 miles from the coast of Africa. Ever popular with British holidaymakers, Gibraltar is very much a home from home, boasting excellent duty-free shopping in many familiar British high street shops. Please note: Gibraltar’s small size and narrow winding roads mean that excursions are operated by 22-seater mini-buses, accompanied by a driver/guide. Local health and safety regulations prohibit the carriage of walking aids and collapsible wheelchairs on these vehicles. If you do wish to bring a mobility aid, we can arrange the Rock Tour by taxi, which has extra space. If this suits your requirements, please advise the Tours and Travel office when you join the ship, as numbers are limited.

Motril, Spain image
Day 7
Motril, Spain
Motril is located in the Spanish region of Andalucia on the Costa Tropical. It is the biggest town on the Costa with a thriving commercial, fishing and leisure port. An hour and a half's drive east of Malaga and within easy reach of the magnificent Sierra Nevada mountain range, Motril makes an ideal base for exploring the many delights of the Andalucian coastline and its hinterland. Halfway between the resorts of Malaga to the west and Almeria to the east, nestling in the foothills of the Sierra Lujar mountains, Motril is at the heart of one of the most fertile and productive agricultural areas of Spain. The Costa Tropical takes its name from its sub-tropical climate which enables the cultivation of exotic fruits and crops such as sugar cane, oranges, lemons, apples, avocadoes, mangoes and bananas. One of the sights of Motril is the 17th-century church of Nuestra Señora de la Cabeza, dedicated to the town's patron saint.
Palma de Mallorca, Spain image
Day 9
Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Palma de Mallorca, the largest city on the island of Mallorca, is the capital of Spain’s Balearic Islands and a popular destination among Mediterranean cruisers. The sun-kissed island combines a vibrant city centre and shopping areas with a charming old town, known in Spanish as El Casco Antiguo, where many tourist hotspots can be found. With stunning views allied to great beaches, Gothic, Moorish and Renaissance architecture, as well as tasty regional food, Palma ticks all the boxes.

Cagliari, Italy image
Day 11
Cagliari, Italy

Known in Sardinia as Casteddu, Cagliari will enchant and cast a spell on you, just as it did on the famed writer D.H Lawrence. Lawrence proclaimed that he found Cagliari to be "strange and rather wonderful, not a bit like Italy".

That's not to say that Italy is un-wonderful. Lawrence basically summarised how most people feel when exploring Cagliari - it's not just another Italian city. There's something quite different here. The city is stratified beyond words, and wonderfully diverse.

Cagliari's diversity is firmly rooted in history. The city was founded during the 8th Century BC by the Phoenicians, before being dominated by the Romans, the Arabs, the Pisans, and the Punics, alongside the Aragonese. Each civilization left its stamp, crafting a multi-layered metropolis for the ages.

Valletta, Malta image
Day 13
Valletta, Malta

Malta: the country that God built. Well, kind of. Malta is well-known for being the once-stronghold of the famous religious military order, The Knights Hospitaller, who were granted the land in 1530 from the King of Spain in exchange for an annual fee of one Maltese falcon (which eventually inspired the name of Dashiell Hammett’s famous novel). And these marauding knights certainly did a great job putting the place together. Valletta, the nation’s capital, remains the highlight and exploring this fascinating walled city (which kept the Hospitallers secure until they came across Napoleon in 1798) is akin to walking back in time. It’s small size (just 0.3 square miles) makes it the perfect cruise stopover and is the ideal base for exploring the rest of the country on excursions.

Corfu, Greece image
Day 15
Corfu, Greece
Corfu town today is a vivid tapestry of cultures—a sophisticated weave, where charm, history, and natural beauty blend. Located about midway along the island's east coast, this spectacularly lively capital is the cultural heart of Corfu and has a remarkable historic center that UNESCO designated as a World Heritage Site in 2007. All ships and planes dock or land near Corfu town, which occupies a small peninsula jutting into the Ionian Sea.Whether arriving by ferry from mainland Greece or Italy, from another island, or directly by plane, catch your breath by first relaxing with a coffee or a gelato in Corfu town's shaded Liston Arcade, then stroll the narrow lanes of its pedestrians-only quarter. For an overview of the immediate area, and a quick tour of Mon Repos palace, hop on the little tourist train that runs from May to September. Corfu town has a different feel at night, so book a table at one of its famed tavernas to savor the island's unique cuisine.The best way to get around Corfu town is on foot. The town is small enough so that you can easily walk to every sight. There are local buses, but they do not thread their way into the streets (many now car-free) of the historic center. If you are arriving by ferry or plane, it's best to take a taxi to your hotel. Expect to pay about €10 from the airport or ferry terminal to a hotel in Corfu town. If there are no taxis waiting, you can call for one.
Ship Details
Marella Cruises
Marella Explorer

You can expect the same great service, food and entertainment on every single one of our ships. They’re All Inclusive as standard, too. That said, each vessel has a personality of its own. Marella Explorer’s the biggest ship in our fleet, so it goes without saying that the facilities are first-class.

Find your perfect cruise!
Cabins
All Prices