11 nights onboard Norwegian Jade

Panama Canal: Aruba & Cartagena

Winners 2022 Best for Entertainment

Your dream holiday awaits on Norwegian Jade. Sail on a Mediterranean cruise and explore castles, cathedrals, romantic islands, and sophisticated cities. Witness scenery on an Africa cruise as wild and diverse as the creatures that freely roam.

Leaving from: Panama City
Cruise ship: Norwegian Jade
Visiting: Panama City Cartagena Oranjestad Willemstad
Norwegian Cruise Line Logo
Norwegian Cruise Line

Founded in 1966, Miami-based Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL), part of global cruise company Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings (which also owns Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises), is the third-largest cruise line in the world in terms of cruise passengers. NCL has become well-known for its colourful ships featuring a pop-icon style painted hull.

2402
Passengers
1037
Crew
2006
Launched
2022
Last refit
93558t
Tonnage
294m
Length
38m
Width
25kts
Speed
12
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Panama City, Panama
Day 2
River travel
Day 3
Cartagena, Colombia
Day 5
Oranjestad, Aruba
Day 6
Willemstad, Curaçao
Day 8
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Day 9
Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands
Day 10
Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic
Day 12
Miami, Florida, United States
Panama City, Panama image
Day 1
Panama City, Panama
Expect incredible morning views as you arrive into the port for Panama City. Tinged with a silver pre-dawn light, the city will metamorphosise into a golden glow as the sun rises above it. And from then on expect one stunning view after another. Very interesting in its own right, Fuerte Amador is obviously overshadowed by its proximity to Panama City. So should the Miraflores museum of the Canal, which offers a comprehensive and immersive tour of the Canal including a 3-D experience, four exhibition halls, an observation deck, and a surprisingly good restaurant not interest you then there is always the option of lovely Casco Viejo – literally the old quartier of Panama. The grand old colonial houses, cobbled streets, independent boutiques and buzzing street scene make this a must stop on your itinerary. And if you like seafood, you will not want miss the many restaurants and market stalls serving different variations of so-fresh-it’s-still-practically-swimming ceviche. Best eaten like the Panamanians do, with salty crackers and a cold beer on the beach. And if money is no object, a cup of geisha coffee – supposedly the world’s best and definitely the world’s most expensive at $7 a shot is definitely a pick me up! Cool cosmopolitan capital aside, Panama has a skyscraper filled skyline that is worthy of some of its North American counterparts. But if urban utopia is not your scene then fear not, the sandy beaches and lush rainforests are never more than a short cab ride away.
River travel image
Day 2
River travel
Cartagena, Colombia image
Day 3
Cartagena, Colombia
Cartagena's magnificent city walls and fortresses, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, enclose a well-restored historic center (the Cuidad Amurallada, or walled city) with plazas, churches, museums, and shops that have made it a lively coastal vacation spot for South Americans and others. New hotels and restaurants make the walled city a desirable place to stay, and the formerly down-at-the-heels Getsemaní neighborhood attracts those seeking a bohemian buzz. The historic center is a small section of Cartagena; many hotels are in the Bocagrande district, an elongated peninsula where high-rise hotels overlook a long, gray-sand beach.When it was founded in 1533 by Spanish conquistador Pedro de Heredia, Cartagena was the only port on the South American mainland. Gold and silver looted from indigenous peoples passed through here en route to Spain and attracted pirates, including Sir Francis Drake, who in 1586 torched 200 buildings. Cartagena's walls protected the city's riches as well as the New World's most important African slave market.
Oranjestad, Aruba image
Day 5
Oranjestad, Aruba
Aruba's capital is easily explored on foot. Its palm-lined central thoroughfare runs between old and new pastel-painted buildings of typical Dutch design (Spanish influence is also evident in some of the architecture). There are a lot of malls with boutiques and shops—the Renaissance mall carries high-end luxury items and designer fashions. A massive renovation in downtown has given Main Street (a.k.a. Caya G. F. Betico Croes) behind the Renaissance Resort a whole new lease on life: boutique malls, shops, and restaurants have opened next to well-loved family-run businesses. The pedestrian-only walkway and resting areas have unclogged the street, and the new eco-trolley is free and a great way to get around. At this writing, Linear Park was well and will showcase local merchants and artists. There will be activities along a boardwalk that will eventually run all the way to the end of Palm Beach, making it the longest of its kind in the Caribbean.
Willemstad, Curaçao image
Day 6
Willemstad, Curaçao
Dutch settlers came here in the 1630s, about the same time they sailed through the Verazzano Narrows to Manhattan, bringing with them original red-tile roofs, first used on the trade ships as ballast and later incorporated into the architecture of Willemstad. Much of the original colonial structures remain, but this historic city is constantly reinventing itself and the government monument foundation is always busy restoring buildings in one urban neighborhood or another. The salty air causes what is called "wall cancer" which causes the ancient abodes to continually crumble over time. The city is cut in two by Santa Anna Bay. On one side is Punda (the point)—crammed with shops, restaurants, monuments, and markets and a new museum retracing its colorful history. And on the other side is Otrobanda (literally meaning the "other side"), with lots of narrow, winding streets and alleyways (called "steekjes" in Dutch), full of private homes notable for their picturesque gables and Dutch-influenced designs. In recent years the ongoing regeneration of Otrobanda has been apparent, marked by a surge in development of new hotels, restaurants, and shops; the rebirth, concentrated near the waterfront, was spearheaded by the creation of the elaborate Kura Hulanda complex.There are three ways to cross the bay: by car over the Juliana Bridge; by foot over the Queen Emma pontoon bridge (locally called "The Swinging Old Lady"); or by free ferry, which runs when the pontoon bridge is swung open for passing ships. All the major hotels outside town offer free shuttle service to town once or twice daily. Shuttles coming from the Otrobanda side leave you at Riffort. From here it's a short walk north to the foot of the pontoon bridge. Shuttles coming from the Punda side leave you near the main entrance to Ft. Amsterdam.
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis image
Day 8
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Mountainous St. Kitts, the first English settlement in the Leeward Islands, crams some stunning scenery into its 65 square miles (168 square km). Vast, brilliant green fields of sugarcane (the former cash crop, now slowly being replanted) run to the shore. The fertile, lush island has some fascinating natural and historical attractions: a rain forest replete with waterfalls, thick vines, and secret trails; a central mountain range dominated by the 3,792-foot Mt. Liamuiga, whose crater has long been dormant; and Brimstone Hill, known in the 18th century as the Gibraltar of the West Indies. St. Kitts and Nevis, along with Anguilla, achieved self-government as an associated state of Great Britain in 1967. In 1983 St. Kitts and Nevis became an independent nation. English with a strong West Indian lilt is spoken here. People are friendly but shy; always ask before you take photographs. Also, be sure to wear wraps or shorts over beach attire when you're in public places.
Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands image
Day 9
Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands
Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic image
Day 10
Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic
San Felipe de Puerto Plata is the capital of the Puerto Plata province on the Dominican Republic’s Atlantic north coast. The city is best known for its beaches. Playa Dorada’s lengthy beachfront is backed by resorts and an 18-hole golf course. The city’s old colonial-era center is dominated by the 16th-century Fortaleza San Felipe, a Spanish fortress that now houses historical and military artifacts.
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 12
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
Ship Details
Norwegian Cruise Line
Norwegian Jade

Your dream holiday awaits on Norwegian Jade. Sail on a Mediterranean cruise and explore castles, cathedrals, romantic islands, and sophisticated cities. Witness scenery on an Africa cruise as wild and diverse as the creatures that freely roam.

Find your perfect cruise!
Cabins
All Prices