8 nights onboard Le Champlain

Pearls of the Caribbean

PONANT brings you an itinerary to the heart of the most enchanting islands in the Caribbean Sea. Board on Le Champlain for a 9-day cruise combining long white-sand beaches and the easy Creole way of life.

Throughout your journey, you will benefit from an excursion included per person per port of call, to choose from a selection offered by PONANT. During this cruise, enjoy a nature hike in Syndicate from Portsmouth, appreciate the beauty of Les Saintes by boat and during a swim, or explore the town of Soufrière, between land and sea, on Saint Lucia. The diversity of experiences on offer promises you intense and varied moments (to discover the full range of excursions, go to the itinerary tab).

From Fort-de-France, the capital of Martinique, Le Champlain will set sail to Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Bequia Island, the ‘whale-hunting island’, and its wild and unspoiled coastline. You will enjoy the lively atmosphere of Port Elizabeth, the island’s main town.

After a call at Mayreau, your sailing yacht will anchor in the Tobago Cays National Park. This rosary of islands, bound together by the most beautiful coral reef in the West Indies, will reveal its incredible underwater wildlife and its secret coves.

You will then island hop gently towards Saint Lucia and its two majestic rocky peaks soaring straight from the sea, a unique location listed as UNESCO World Heritage site.

You will sail towards the enchanting setting offered by the island of Dominica - the Nature Island - before you finally reach Fort-de-France.

An experienced diving instructor is on board for the entire cruise, enabling you to safely enjoy swimming and scuba diving.

Leaving from: Fort-de-France
Cruise ship: Le Champlain
Visiting: Fort-de-France Port Elizabeth, Bequia Mayreau Island Tobago Cays
Ponant Logo
Ponant

When searching for a luxury yacht expedition cruise, there’s one name above all else that you need to know – Ponant Cruises. Founded in 1988 by former French Merchant Navy officers, Ponant combines succulent luxury with authentic adventures on all seven continents.

From classic Mediterranean itineraries and Caribbean sailings, to bucket-list expeditions around Greenland and Antarctica, Ponant cruises proudly counteract the banality of mainstream voyages with a unique take on the concept of small-ship cruising. It’s the absolute trip of a lifetime.

2018
Launched
EUR
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Fort-de-France, Martinique
Day 2
Port Elizabeth, Bequia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Day 3
Mayreau Island, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Day 4
Tobago Cays, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Days 5 - 5
Union Island, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Day 6
Pigeon Island, Saint Lucia
Day 6
Soufrière, Saint Lucia
Day 7
Îles des Saintes, Guadeloupe
Day 8
Portsmouth, Dominica
Day 9
Fort-de-France, Martinique
Fort-de-France, Martinique image
Day 1
Fort-de-France, Martinique
The largest of the Windward Islands, Martinique is 4,261 mi (6,817 km) from Paris, but its spirit and language are decidedly French, with more than a soupçon of West Indian spice. Tangible, edible evidence of the fact is the island's cuisine, a superb blend of French and creole. Martinique is lushly landscaped with tropical flowers. Trees bend under the weight of fruits such as mangoes, papayas, lemons, limes, and bright-red West Indian cherries. Acres of banana plantations, pineapple fields, and waving sugarcane stretch to the horizon. The towering mountains and verdant rain forest in the north lure hikers, while underwater sights and sunken treasures attract snorkelers and scuba divers. Martinique is also wonderful if your idea of exercise is turning over every 10 minutes to get an even tan and your taste in adventure runs to duty-free shopping. A popular cruise-ship excursion goes to St-Pierre, which was buried by ash when Mont Pelée erupted in 1902.
Port Elizabeth, Bequia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines image
Day 2
Port Elizabeth, Bequia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Bequia is a Carib word meaning "island of the cloud." Hilly and green with several golden-sand beaches, Bequia is 9 miles (14½ km) south of St. Vincent's southwestern shore; with a population of 5,000, it's the largest of the Grenadines. Although boatbuilding, whaling, and fishing have been the predominant industries here for generations, sailing has now become almost synonymous with Bequia. Admiralty Bay is a favored anchorage for both privately owned and chartered yachts. Lodgings range from comfortable resorts and villas to cozy West Indian—style inns. Bequia's airport and the frequent ferry service from St. Vincent make this a favorite destination for day-trippers, as well. The ferry docks in Port Elizabeth, a tiny town with waterfront bars, restaurants, and shops where you can buy handmade souvenirs—including the exquisitely detailed model sailboats that are a famous Bequia export. The Easter Regatta is held during the four-day Easter weekend, when revelers gather to watch boat races and celebrate the island's seafaring traditions with food, music, dancing, and competitive games.To see the views, villages, beaches, and boatbuilding sites around Bequia, hire a taxi at the jetty in Port Elizabeth. Several usually line up under the almond trees to meet each ferry from St. Vincent.
Mayreau Island, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines image
Day 3
Mayreau Island, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
The small island of Mayreau, just one and 1/2 square miles in area (3.9 square kilometres) is the smallest inhabited island of The Grenadines, and is part of the independent state of St.Vincent in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Two of the best known islands in The Grenadines are Mustique and Bequia, the second largest island in this group. The Grenadine Islands are strung out in a gentle sweep between St.Vincent and Grenada. Most visitors to Mayreau arrive from cruise ships, on the regular ferry, or by yacht. There are no proper roads on the island, only a few vehicles, no airport and only a single unnamed village. Mayreau and the neighboring Tobago Cays are very popular for divers and snorkellers. Saline Bay, on the west coast of the island, has a wonderful broad beach and a few local vendors selling T-shirts and local craft. A climb up the road to the hilltop village on the island provides breathtaking views across Mayreau, Canouan, the Tobago Cays and Carriacou.
Tobago Cays, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines image
Day 4
Tobago Cays, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Union Island, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines image
Days 5 - 5
Union Island, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Pigeon Island, Saint Lucia image
Day 6
Pigeon Island, Saint Lucia
Soufrière, Saint Lucia image
Day 6
Soufrière, Saint Lucia
The oldest town in St. Lucia and the island’s former French colonial capital, Soufrière was founded by the French in 1746 and named for its proximity to the volcano of the same name. The wharf is the center of activity in this sleepy town (population, 9,000), particularly when a cruise ship anchors in pretty Soufrière Bay. French colonial influences are evident in the second-story verandahs, gingerbread trim, and other appointments of the wooden buildings that surround the market square. The market building itself is decorated with colorful murals. Soufrière, the site of much of St. Lucia’s renowned natural beauty, is the destination of most sightseeing trips. This is where you can get up close to the iconic Pitons and visit colonial capital of St. Lucia, with its "drive-in" volcano, botanical gardens, working plantations, waterfalls, and countless other examples of the natural beauty for which St. Lucia is deservedly famous.
Îles des Saintes, Guadeloupe image
Day 7
Îles des Saintes, Guadeloupe
This small group of islands lies opposite the western part of Guadeloupe. They were discovered in November 1493 by Columbus, who named them Los Santos. French settlers established themselves in 1648 and changed the name to Iles des Saintes, commonly known as Les Saintes. Since then the islands have been closely connected with Guadeloupe. Until a recent influx of tourism, Les Saintes were among the Caribbean’s most unspoiled destinations. Only two of the eight islands are inhabited: Terre-de-Bas and Terre-de-Haut. The latter is known for its impressive Fort Napoleon built in the early 19th century to replace an earlier 17th-century fort. From its vantage point there are fine views of the many tiny islets scattered in the bay and across to Guadeloupe. Terre-de-Haut is the main island of Les Saintes, with steeply scarped hills, scenic valleys, hidden coves and beautiful beaches. Its main settlement consists of a charming village of red-roofed houses situated along a curving bay. A number of small boutiques and gift shops invite browsing. Quaint cafés and restaurants offer food and drink. To the east of the village lies Grande Anse, a fine sand beach. Most of the attractions on this small island can be seen on foot. With just a few vehicles on the island, there are no organized tours possible. Time ashore here is at your leisure.
Portsmouth, Dominica image
Day 8
Portsmouth, Dominica

Portsmouth, or ‘Pompey’ as the locals lovingly refer to it, has many claims to fame, having been the birthplace of the great Charles Dickens and a historic dockyard. The UK’s only island city is home to a host of attractions and landmarks showcasing its rich maritime and literary heritage, all of which can be explored during your cruise stopover.

Fort-de-France, Martinique image
Day 9
Fort-de-France, Martinique
The largest of the Windward Islands, Martinique is 4,261 mi (6,817 km) from Paris, but its spirit and language are decidedly French, with more than a soupçon of West Indian spice. Tangible, edible evidence of the fact is the island's cuisine, a superb blend of French and creole. Martinique is lushly landscaped with tropical flowers. Trees bend under the weight of fruits such as mangoes, papayas, lemons, limes, and bright-red West Indian cherries. Acres of banana plantations, pineapple fields, and waving sugarcane stretch to the horizon. The towering mountains and verdant rain forest in the north lure hikers, while underwater sights and sunken treasures attract snorkelers and scuba divers. Martinique is also wonderful if your idea of exercise is turning over every 10 minutes to get an even tan and your taste in adventure runs to duty-free shopping. A popular cruise-ship excursion goes to St-Pierre, which was buried by ash when Mont Pelée erupted in 1902.
Ship Details
Ponant
Le Champlain

Featuring innovative and environmentally-friendly equipment, elegantly designed cabins, spacious suites with large windows, and lounge areas that open onto the outside, this new limited-capacity yacht boasting just 92 cabins and suites will offer you a truly unique cruising experience.

Find your perfect cruise!
All Prices