12 nights onboard Star Legend

Red Sea Revelries via the Suez Canal

Cruise from the cradle of Western Civilization and transit the Suez Canal to the warm and inviting waters of the Red Sea during a 10-day voyage that visits the coastlines of Egypt, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia. Meander the maze-like corridors in search of a mythical Minotaur in an excavated Minoan palace. Spend the day transiting the Suez Canal, an elusive dream of pharaohs and emperors before its 1869 completion. Journey to the Great Pyramids and the iconic Sphinx of Giza. Cruise the Nile River and wander the world's largest outdoor museum prior to dining on lamb kebabs and rice-stuffed peppers during an overnight stay in Luxor. Caress the rose-tinged sandstone walls of Petra or hang on tight to Jordanian camels on the warm desert expanses outside Aqaba. Authentic hospitality awaits you in Bedouin camps outside Yanbu. Welcome to a land of Arabian coffee, countless palaces and mosques, Bedouins and veiled women.
Leaving from: Jeddah
Cruise ship: Star Legend
Visiting: Jeddah Yanbu al-Bahr Safaga Safaga
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Windstar Cruises

Windstar Cruises operates a fleet of small luxury cruise ships. The cruise line has six yachts - three of which are masted sailing ships - and offers laid-back luxury with a tinge of historic seafaring adventure.

Wind Star and Wind Spirit each carry 148 guests, whereas Wind Surf carries 342. 'Power yachts' Star Pride, Star Breeze and Star Legend all carry 312 passengers. It's a unique experience, by all means!

312
Passengers
204
Crew
1992
Launched
2021
Last refit
12995t
Tonnage
159m
Length
19m
Width
15kts
Speed
6
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Day 2
Yanbu al-Bahr, Saudi Arabia
Days 4 - 5
Safaga, Egypt
Day 6
Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt
Day 7
'Aqaba, Jordan
Day 8
Hurghada, Egypt
Day 9
Ain Sukhna, Egypt
Days 9 - 10
Suez, Egypt
Day 12
Heraklion (Iraklion), Crete, Greece
Day 13
Piraeus, Greece
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia image
Day 1
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Yanbu al-Bahr, Saudi Arabia image
Day 2
Yanbu al-Bahr, Saudi Arabia
Safaga, Egypt image
Days 4 - 5
Safaga, Egypt
Port Safago has been undergoing a transformation, slowly metamorphosing into a holiday rsort. Like other cities on the Red Sea, the commercial port town sits close to great offshore dive sites. Unlike others, however, tourist development hasn't taken off in a meaningful way. But if the mass tourism in Hurghada is a turnoff, Safaga offers a small-scale and much more low-key alternative, though the best dive sites can still be seen on a day trip from Hurghada. Safaga is also the closest beach resort to Luxor and the Valley of the Kings, which lies 200 km (124 mi) to the southwest; when cruise ships offer land excursions to Luxor, they often do so through Safaga.
Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt image
Day 6
Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt
The port and town of Sharm-el-Sheikh lies near the southernmost tip of the Sinai Peninsula where the Straits of Tiran meet the Gulf of Aqaba. With its strategic position, the Sinai posed a desirable target for various rulers over the centuries. In recent times, the last battle for the Sinai was fought between Egypt and Israel from 1967 to 1979, ending with a peace treaty signed in Washington, D.C. Since the withdrawal of the Israelis, more and more Egyptians have settled in the Sinai, taking advantage of the booming tourist trade. However, vast interior regions are still sparsely populated. Many Bedouins have been affected by the advent of the 21st century, which is rapidly changing their age-old customs and nomadic lifestyle. As tourism and hotel projects continue to spring up along the Sinai coast, contact with Bedouins not involved in tourism is becoming increasingly rare. Once their nomadic life kept them on the move with their tents; today many Bedouins cultivate grain, vegetables and dates in addition to catering to the tourists. Sharm-el-Sheikh was initially developed by the Israelis during the Sinai occupation. Na'ama Bay, a short drive from the port, has grown from virtually nothing into a sizeable resort since the early 1980s. Between the two towns, a string of hotels line a once-untouched coastline. Resort hotels offer great opportunities for swimming, snorkelling and scuba diving. Glass bottom boat trips are available for those preferring to view the exotic marine life of the Red Sea without getting their feet wet.
'Aqaba, Jordan image
Day 7
'Aqaba, Jordan
The resort town of Aqaba, on the Red Sea at the southern end of Jordan, is a popular spot for divers with some of the best coral reefs in the world. Snorkeling and other water sports are popular, and it's easy to hire a boat for a day or half-day, including lunch.Aqaba has become quite a bustling destination, with several large luxury hotels and a large shopping area. There are many jewelry stores selling pearls, gem stones, and gold and silver jewelry. It's worth noting that although it's an international beach resort, Aqaba is quite conservative—certainly much more so than Amman—and North Americans tend to be more comfortable at the private hotel beaches.
Hurghada, Egypt image
Day 8
Hurghada, Egypt
Ain Sukhna, Egypt image
Day 9
Ain Sukhna, Egypt
Suez, Egypt image
Days 9 - 10
Suez, Egypt
Heraklion (Iraklion), Crete, Greece image
Day 12
Heraklion (Iraklion), Crete, Greece
Having been controlled by Arabic, Venetian and Ottoman empires over the years - it's no surprise that Heraklion is a diverse patchwork of exotic cultures and historical treasures. Celebrated as the birthplace of the Spanish Renaissance artist, El Greco, you can visit to explore the storied ruins of the Minoan empire's capital, and unearth the rich cultural treasures that Crete’s bustling modern capital has to offer.
Piraeus, Greece image
Day 13
Piraeus, Greece
It's no wonder that all roads lead to the fascinating and maddening metropolis of Athens. Lift your eyes 200 feet above the city to the Parthenon, its honey-color marble columns rising from a massive limestone base, and you behold architectural perfection that has not been surpassed in 2,500 years. But, today, this shrine of classical form dominates a 21st-century boomtown. To experience Athens—Athína in Greek—fully is to understand the essence of Greece: ancient monuments surviving in a sea of cement, startling beauty amid the squalor, tradition juxtaposed with modernity. Locals depend on humor and flexibility to deal with the chaos; you should do the same. The rewards are immense. Although Athens covers a huge area, the major landmarks of the ancient Greek, Roman, and Byzantine periods are close to the modern city center. You can easily walk from the Acropolis to many other key sites, taking time to browse in shops and relax in cafés and tavernas along the way. From many quarters of the city you can glimpse "the glory that was Greece" in the form of the Acropolis looming above the horizon, but only by actually climbing that rocky precipice can you feel the impact of the ancient settlement. The Acropolis and Filopappou, two craggy hills sitting side by side; the ancient Agora (marketplace); and Kerameikos, the first cemetery, form the core of ancient and Roman Athens. Along the Unification of Archaeological Sites promenade, you can follow stone-paved, tree-lined walkways from site to site, undisturbed by traffic. Cars have also been banned or reduced in other streets in the historical center. In the National Archaeological Museum, vast numbers of artifacts illustrate the many millennia of Greek civilization; smaller museums such as the Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art Museum and the Byzantine and Christian Museum illuminate the history of particular regions or periods. Athens may seem like one huge city, but it is really a conglomeration of neighborhoods with distinctive characters. The Eastern influences that prevailed during the 400-year rule of the Ottoman Empire are still evident in Monastiraki, the bazaar area near the foot of the Acropolis. On the northern slope of the Acropolis, stroll through Plaka (if possible by moonlight), an area of tranquil streets lined with renovated mansions, to get the flavor of the 19th-century's gracious lifestyle. The narrow lanes of Anafiotika, a section of Plaka, thread past tiny churches and small, color-washed houses with wooden upper stories, recalling a Cycladic island village. In this maze of winding streets, vestiges of the older city are everywhere: crumbling stairways lined with festive tavernas; dank cellars filled with wine vats; occasionally a court or diminutive garden, enclosed within high walls and filled with magnolia trees and the flaming trumpet-shaped flowers of hibiscus bushes. Formerly run-down old quarters, such as Thission, Gazi and Psirri, popular nightlife areas filled with bars and mezedopoleia (similar to tapas bars), are now in the process of gentrification, although they still retain much of their original charm, as does the colorful produce and meat market on Athinas. The area around Syntagma Square, the tourist hub, and Omonia Square, the commercial heart of the city about 1 km (½ mi) northwest, is distinctly European, having been designed by the court architects of King Otho, a Bavarian, in the 19th century. The chic shops and bistros of ritzy Kolonaki nestle at the foot of Mt. Lycabettus, Athens's highest hill (909 feet). Each of Athens's outlying suburbs has a distinctive character: in the north is wealthy, tree-lined Kifissia, once a summer resort for aristocratic Athenians, and in the south and southeast lie Glyfada, Voula, and Vouliagmeni, with their sandy beaches, seaside bars, and lively summer nightlife. Just beyond the city's southern fringes is Piraeus, a bustling port city of waterside fish tavernas and Saronic Gulf views.
Ship Details
Windstar Cruises
Star Legend

Star Legend is large enough to pamper and entertain you, yet small enough to tuck into delightful tiny harbours and hidden coves that others can’t reach.

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