23 nights onboard MSC Preziosa

Brazil, Spain, Morocco, United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, Denmark, Norway, Germany

The classic design of beautifully crafted MSC Preziosa includes spectacular features such as a real stone piazza, sweeping Swarovski crystal staircases and a magical ‘infinity’ pool. There’s all this and more to discover at your own pace on board, enjoying every moment to the full as you voyage to some of the world’s most beautiful destinations.

Leaving from: Rio de Janeiro
Cruise ship: MSC Preziosa
Visiting: Rio de Janeiro Ilheus Salvador de Bahia Maceió
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MSC Cruises

MSC Cruises may be headquartered in Switzerland, but the ambience onboard its 23 ships is very much Italian owing to its owners, the Aponte family.

Ships feature a two-storey Mediterranean-style promenade and Instagram-worthy glass staircases filled with Swarovski crystals.

The line’s flagship is the 6,327 passenger MSC Euribia, which is MSC's second ship to run on liquefied natural gas.

4345
Passengers
1388
Crew
2013
Launched
139072t
Tonnage
333m
Length
38m
Width
24kts
Speed
13
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Day 3
Ilheus, Brazil
Day 4
Salvador de Bahia, Brazil
Day 5
Maceió, Brazil
Day 11
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
Day 13
Casablanca, Morocco
Day 15
Vigo, Spain
Day 17
Southampton, England
Day 18
Cherbourg, France
Day 19
Rotterdam, Netherlands
Day 21
Copenhagen, Denmark
Day 22
Oslo, Norway
Day 24
Hamburg, Germany
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil image
Day 1
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Welcome to the Cidade Maravilhosa, or the Marvelous City, as Rio is known in Brazil. Synonymous with the girl from Ipanema, the dramatic views from Christ the Redeemer atop Corcovado mountain, and fabulously flamboyant Carnival celebrations, Rio is a city of stunning architecture, abundant museums, and marvelous food. Rio is also home to 23 beaches, an almost continuous 73-km (45-mile) ribbon of sand.As you leave the airport and head to Rio's beautiful Zona Sul (the touristic South Zone), you'll drive for about 40 minutes on a highway from where you'll begin to get a sense of the dramatic contrast between beautiful landscape and devastating poverty. In this teeming metropolis of 12 million people (6.2 million of whom live in Rio proper), the very rich and the very poor live in uneasy proximity. You'll drive past seemingly endless cinder-block favela, but by the time you reach Copacabana's breezy, sunny Avenida Atlântica—flanked on one side by white beach and azure sea and on the other by condominiums and hotels—your heart will leap with expectation as you begin to recognize the postcard-famous sights. Now you're truly in Rio, where cariocas (Rio residents) and tourists live life to its fullest.Enthusiasm is contagious in Rio. Prepare to have your senses engaged and your inhibitions untied. Rio seduces with a host of images: the joyous bustle of vendors at Sunday's Feira Hippie (Hippie Fair); the tipsy babble at sidewalk cafés as patrons sip their last glass of icy beer under the stars; the blanket of lights beneath the Pão de Açúcar (Sugarloaf Mountain); the bikers, joggers, strollers, and power walkers who parade along the beach each morning. Borrow the carioca spirit for your stay; you may find yourself reluctant to give it back.
Ilheus, Brazil image
Day 3
Ilheus, Brazil
Salvador de Bahia, Brazil image
Day 4
Salvador de Bahia, Brazil
According to Salvador's adopted son Jorge Amado, "In Salvador, magic becomes part of the every-day." From the shimmering golden light of sunset over the Baía do Todos os Santos, to the rhythmic beats that race along the streets, Salvador, while no longer Brazil's capital, remains one of its most captivating cities. A large dose of its exoticism comes down to its African heritage—at least 70% of its 2,675,000 population is classified as Afro-Brazilian—and how it has blended into Brazil's different strands, from the native Indians to the Christian colonizers. Salvadorans may tell you that you can visit a different church every day of the year, which is almost true—the city has about 300. Churches whose interiors are covered with gold leaf were financed by the riches of the Portuguese colonial era, when slaves masked their traditional religious beliefs under a thin Catholic veneer. And partly thanks to modern-day acceptance of those beliefs, Salvador has become the fount of Candomblé, a religion based on personal dialogue with the orixás, a family of African deities closely linked to nature and the Catholic saints. The influence of Salvador's African heritage on Brazilian music has also turned the city into one of the musical capitals of Brazil, resulting in a myriad of venues to enjoy live music across the city, along with international acclaim for exponents like Gilberto Gil, Caetano Veloso, and Daniela Mercury. Salvador's economy today is focused on telecommunications and tourism. The still-prevalent African culture draws many tourists—this is the best place in Brazil to hear African music, learn or watch African dance, and see capoeira, a martial art developed by slaves. In the district of Pelourinho, many colorful 18th- and 19th-century houses remain, part of the reason why this is the center of the tourist trade. Salvador sprawls across a peninsula surrounded by the Baía de Todos os Santos on one side and the Atlantic Ocean on the other. The city has about 50 km (31 miles) of coastline. The original city, referred to as the Centro Histórica (Historical Center), is divided into the Cidade Alta (Upper City), also called Pelourinho, and Cidade Baixa (Lower City). The Cidade Baixa is a commercial area—known as Comércio—that runs along the port and is the site of Salvador's indoor market, Mercado Modelo. You can move between the upper and lower cities on foot, via the landmark Elevador Lacerda, behind the market, or on the Plano Inclinado, a funicular lift, which connects Rua Guindaste dos Padres on Comércio with the alley behind Cathedral Basílica. From the Cidade Histórica you can travel north along the bay to the hilltop Igreja de Nosso Senhor do Bonfim. You can also head south to the point, guarded by the Forte Santo Antônio da Barra, where the bay waters meet those of the Atlantic. This area on Salvador's southern tip is home to the trendy neighborhoods of Barra, Ondina, and Rio Vermelho, with many museums, theaters, shops, and restaurants. Beaches along the Atlantic coast and north of Forte Santo Antônio da Barra are among the city's cleanest. Many are illuminated at night and have bars and restaurants that stay open late.
Maceió, Brazil image
Day 5
Maceió, Brazil
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain image
Day 11
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
The largest of the Canary Islands, Tenerife is a beautiful and scenic island which enjoys year-round sunshine and is dominated by Mount Teide. The mountain range runs through the centre of the island, with fertile valleys on the northern side. In the central part of the range is the gigantic natural crater of the Cañadas del Teide, about 14 miles in diameter. Santa Cruz, the island’s pretty capital, was originally a small fishing village but has now grown into a modern city, and also contains 16th-century civic buildings and ornate private mansions. Near the pier is the Santa Cruz Palmetum, a Botanical Garden covering an area of 29 acres, specialising in palms.
Casablanca, Morocco image
Day 13
Casablanca, Morocco

Many of you might will have a picture of Casablanca in your head, that has no doubt been taken from the classic Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman 1942 film – all gin joints, Moroccan souks and old stone medina alleys. But of course, time has gone by and the Casablanca of today may still have an old-world, romantic charm, but it has moved with the times and is now a thriving commercial capital, packed full of cultural attractions, contemporary galleries and top-notch restaurants just waiting to be discovered. The multifaceted port city, which fronts the Atlantic Ocean in western Morocco, combines its French colonial heritage with traditional Arab culture and European Art Deco and modernist architecture.

Vigo, Spain image
Day 15
Vigo, Spain
Dating from Roman times, the Galician city of Vigo has a fine natural harbour and is renowned as the biggest fishing port in the world. It is also full of history - it was in this fjord-like quay that the English and Dutch defeated the French and Spanish fleets in 1702. Today, the attractive marinas stand in contrast to the industrialised areas of the city, while further exploration will reveal the characteristic 17th-century architecture and attractive countryside beyond. The charming Old Town is a delight, with its labyrinth of winding narrow streets and shaded squares. Nearby is the Cathedral city of Tui, and further to the north is the pilgrimage centre of Santiago de Compostela, which can be reached by car in approximately 1¼ hours.
Southampton, England image
Day 17
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Cherbourg, France image
Day 18
Cherbourg, France
Originally a little fishing village, Cherbourg has developed into a historic port designed by Vauban. This was also a strategic naval port during the Napoleonic wars; there is a marina with over 1000 moorings. “Cap de la Hague” is to the West and the “Pointe de Barfleur” to the East. This port, which belongs to Normandy, is a region that has provided inspiration for countless artists and writers, and is the land of apple orchards and rolling farmland dotted with villages of half-timbered houses. Boasting a wealth of abbeys and châteaux, as well as a superb coastline, it offers something for everyone. Cherbourg was also the first stop of RMS Titanic after it left Southampton, England. On 19 June 1864, the naval engagement between USS Kearsarge and CSS Alabama took place off Cherbourg. The Battle of Cherbourg, fought in June 1944 following the Normandy Invasion, ended with the capture of Cherbourg on June 30.
Rotterdam, Netherlands image
Day 19
Rotterdam, Netherlands

Rotterdam is a city that's a long way removed from most people's stereotypical notion of the Netherlands. There are few, if any, canals to be found here nor are there any quaint windmills. There is, however, a thriving modern city which is one of the busiest ports in the entire world.

Copenhagen, Denmark image
Day 21
Copenhagen, Denmark

By the 11th century, Copenhagen was already an important trading and fishing centre and today you will find an attractive city which, although the largest in Scandinavia, has managed to retain its low-level skyline. Discover some of the famous attractions including Gefion Fountain and Amalienborg Palace, perhaps cruise the city’s waterways, visit Rosenborg Castle or explore the medieval fishing village of Dragoer. Once the home of Hans Christian Andersen, Copenhagen features many reminders of its fairytale heritage and lives up to the reputation immortalised in the famous song ‘Wonderful Copenhagen’.

Oslo, Norway image
Day 22
Oslo, Norway
Oslo is the capital of Norway and is also its largest city, situated at the head of Oslo Fjord and surrounded by hills and forests. Home to some 50 museums and full of galleries, cafés, a sculpture park and the Royal Palace, this vibrant city with its handsome 19th-century buildings and wide streets has much to offer. Its history dates back 1,000 years, and includes a rich seafaring heritage that ranges from the Viking era to Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon Tiki expedition. Discover more about this exciting city on our varied selection of excursions.
Hamburg, Germany image
Day 24
Hamburg, Germany
Hamburg is Germany’s second-largest city with a history dating back to Charlemagne. A major port, this vibrant city is home to art and culture, extensive shopping facilities, Baroque buildings and waterfront vistas. With its well-known fish market, art galleries and Museums together with several beautiful parks including a botanical garden, this is a city with something for everyone. British visitors who remember the Swinging Sixties may like to visit the streets around Grosse Freiheit, where an unknown pop group called The Beatles gave their first public performances in various local clubs before achieving worldwide fame. Please note: Those on the Saga Pearl II P2216 cruise in December 2018 should be aware that the Christmas Market is likely to be extremely busy during your call.
Ship Details
MSC Cruises
MSC Preziosa

The classic design of beautifully crafted MSC Preziosa includes spectacular features such as a real stone piazza, sweeping Swarovski crystal staircases and a magical ‘infinity’ pool. There’s all this and more to discover at your own pace on board, enjoying every moment to the full as you voyage to some of the world’s most beautiful destinations.

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