28 nights onboard Viking Venus

South Pacific Sojourn

With their sleek, yacht-style bows and teak promenade decks, Viking’s ocean ships are a million miles from the large liners that sail the seas.

Leaving from: Sydney, New South Wales
Cruise ship: Viking Venus
Visiting: Sydney, New South Wales Newcastle, New South Wales Mooloolaba, Queensland Airlie Beach
Viking Ocean Cruises Logo
Viking Ocean Cruises

Viking began as a river cruise line and entered the ocean-cruise market with the launch of the 930-guest Viking Star.

Viking has already made an indelible mark on the sector with its fleet of stylish, near-identical, adult-only ships.

The cruise line currently has 10 ships in its fleet.

930
Passengers
465
Crew
2020
Launched
48000t
Tonnage
227m
Length
29m
Width
20kts
Speed
9
Decks
EUR
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Day 2
Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
Day 3
River travel
Day 4
Mooloolaba, Queensland, Australia
Day 5
River travel
Day 6
Airlie Beach, Australia
Day 7
Townsville, Queensland, Australia
Day 8
Cairns, Queensland, Australia
Day 9
River travel
Day 10
Thursday Island, Queensland, Australia
Day 11
River travel
Days 12 - 13
Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
Day 14
River travel
Day 15
Komodo Island, Indonesia
Day 16
Lombok, Indonesia
Days 17 - 18
Benoa, Bali, Indonesia
Day 19
Surabaya, Indonesia
Day 20
Semarang, Indonesia
Days 21 - 22
Jakarta, Indonesia
Day 23
River travel
Day 24
Singapore, Singapore
Day 25
Port Klang, Malaysia
Days 26 - 27
River travel
Days 28 - 29
Laem Chabang, Thailand
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia image
Day 1
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Sydney belongs to the exclusive club of cities that generate excitement. At the end of a marathon flight there's renewed vitality in the cabin as the plane circles the city, where thousands of yachts are suspended on the dark water and the sails of the Opera House glisten in the distance. Blessed with dazzling beaches and a sunny climate, Sydney is among the most beautiful cities on the planet.With 4.6 million people, Sydney is the biggest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia. A wave of immigration from the 1950s has seen the Anglo-Irish immigrants who made up the city's original population joined by Italians, Greeks, Turks, Lebanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thais, and Indonesians. This intermingling has created a cultural vibrancy and energy—and a culinary repertoire—that was missing only a generation ago.Sydneysiders embrace their harbor with a passion. Indented with numerous bays and beaches, Sydney Harbour is the presiding icon for the city, and urban Australia. Captain Arthur Phillip, commander of the 11-ship First Fleet, wrote in his diary when he first set eyes on the harbor on January 26, 1788: "We had the satisfaction of finding the finest harbor in the world."Although a visit to Sydney is an essential part of an Australian experience, the city is no more representative of Australia than Los Angeles is of the United States. Sydney has joined the ranks of the great cities whose characters are essentially international. What Sydney offers is style, sophistication, and great looks—an exhilarating prelude to the continent at its back door.
Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia image
Day 2
Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
River travel image
Day 3
River travel
Mooloolaba, Queensland, Australia image
Day 4
Mooloolaba, Queensland, Australia
River travel image
Day 5
River travel
Airlie Beach, Australia image
Day 6
Airlie Beach, Australia
Townsville, Queensland, Australia image
Day 7
Townsville, Queensland, Australia
This coastal city has little in the way of sandy beaches or surf, but it does have shady parks, charming colonial buildings, and a boardwalk-flanked waterfront Esplanade with a terrific man-made beach and picnic facilities. The historic town center has thrived recently, with an influx of lively eateries and bars. There are also some excellent museum and a world-class aquarium.Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service has an office on Magnetic Island, but Townsville Enterprise's information kiosks in Flinders Square and the Museum of Tropical Queensland (MTQ), on the mainland, are the best sources of visitor info about the island.
Cairns, Queensland, Australia image
Day 8
Cairns, Queensland, Australia
Cairns, with its rich history dating back thousands of years to the Indigenous Aboriginal peoples, offers cruisegoers a glimpse into Australia's ancient past. Once a sleepy fishing village, Cairns has evolved into a bustling tourist hub, attracting visitors with its vibrant culture and stunning natural beauty. The city's unique blend of Indigenous, European, and Asian influences is evident in its art, cuisine, and traditions. Local cuisine in Cairns is a feast for the senses, with fresh seafood, tropical fruits, and Indigenous bush tucker dishes tantalizing taste buds. Don't miss the chance to try traditional Aboriginal fare like kangaroo or crocodile, washed down with a refreshing glass of locally brewed beer or a tropical cocktail.
River travel image
Day 9
River travel
Thursday Island, Queensland, Australia image
Day 10
Thursday Island, Queensland, Australia
River travel image
Day 11
River travel
Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia image
Days 12 - 13
Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
Darwin is Australia's most colorful, and exotic, capital city. Surrounded on three sides by the turquoise waters of the Timor Sea, the streets are lined with tropical flowers and trees. Warm and dry in winter, hot and steamy in summer, it's a relaxed and casual place, as well as a beguiling blend of tropical frontier outpost and Outback hardiness. Thanks to its close proximity to Southeast Asia and its multicultural population it also seems more like Asia than the rest of Australia. Darwin is a city that has always had to fight for its survival. The seductiveness of contemporary Darwin lifestyles belies a history of failed attempts that date from 1824 when Europeans attempted to establish an enclave in this harsh, unyielding climate. The original 1869 settlement, called Palmerston, was built on a parcel of mangrove wetlands and scrub forest that had changed little in 15 million years. It was not until 1911, after it had already weathered the disastrous cyclones of 1878, 1882, and 1897, that the town was named after the scientist who had visited Australia's shores aboard the Beagle in 1839. During World War II it was bombed more than 60 times, as the harbor full of warships was a prime target for the Japanese war planes. Then, on the night of Christmas Eve 1974, the city was almost completely destroyed by Cyclone Tracy, Australia’s greatest natural disaster. It's a tribute to those who stayed and to those who have come to live here after Tracy that the rebuilt city now thrives as an administrative and commercial center for northern Australia. Old Darwin has been replaced by something of an edifice complex—such buildings as Parliament House and the Supreme Court all seem very grand for such a small city, especially one that prides itself on its casual, outdoor-centric lifestyle. Today Darwin is the best place from which to explore Australia's Top End, with its wonders of Kakadu and the Kimberley region.
River travel image
Day 14
River travel
Komodo Island, Indonesia image
Day 15
Komodo Island, Indonesia
Pink Beach earned its name for the way the beach can appear to have a rosy hue in certain lights. The color comes from small flecks of red coral mixed in with the fine white reef sand. With a few trees along the beach for shade, this stretch of coast makes a fine place to relax or enjoy a snorkel or dive in the crystal clear waters. It is possible to spot a striped clown fish nestled among the protective tentacles of its sea anemone host, or to see a grouper lazily swimming by a flamboyant soft coral. The reef here is now protected by law and the maturing corals are a joy to behold.
Lombok, Indonesia image
Day 16
Lombok, Indonesia
Lombok's proximity to the Wallace Line, a faunal boundary line that separates the ecozones of Asia and Australia, showcasing a unique diversity in wildlife is one of the many highlights of Lombok. The island's tropical climate with warm, sunny days throughout the year makes it a magnet for cruisegoers seeking both adventure and relaxation. Key attractions in Lombok include the majestic Mount Rinjani, Indonesia's second-highest volcano, offering challenging treks and stunning panoramas; the tranquil Gili Islands, with their pristine beaches and vibrant marine life; and the traditional weaving village of Sukarara, where age-old weaving techniques are still practiced.
Benoa, Bali, Indonesia image
Days 17 - 18
Benoa, Bali, Indonesia
Benoa Harbor, the gateway to Bali's enchanting allure, was transformed from a small fishing village into one of Indonesia's primary cruise hubs, reflecting its growing popularity among international travelers. Its tropical climate ensures warm, sunny days perfect for exploration and relaxation, drawing cruisegoers consistently throughout the year. Main attractions in Benoa include the serene Benoa Beach, the bustling local markets offering a taste of Balinese culture, and water sports activities that cater to adventure seekers.
Surabaya, Indonesia image
Day 19
Surabaya, Indonesia
Surabaya, known as the "City of Heroes" due to its pivotal role in the Indonesian battle for independence, offers a blend of urban charm and historical significance. Its tropical climate makes it a year-round destination, appealing to cruisegoers with its warm weather and cultural depth. Notable sights in Surabaya include the majestic Heroes Monument, the vibrant Chinatown district, and the historic House of Sampoerna, where visitors can delve into the intricacies of Indonesia's tobacco industry.
Semarang, Indonesia image
Day 20
Semarang, Indonesia
Semarang stands as a testament to architectural fusion, where colonial Dutch buildings intermingle with Javanese traditional houses. The city's tropical climate, characterized by warm days and cooler evenings, makes it a year-round destination that consistently attracts cruisegoers. Key attractions include the iconic Lawang Sewu, known for its thousand doors and rich history, and the ancient Sam Poo Kong temple, which celebrates Chinese influence in Java.
Jakarta, Indonesia image
Days 21 - 22
Jakarta, Indonesia
As the stage for pivotal moments in Indonesian independence, Jakarta offers a window into the nation's spirited past. This city, where equatorial warmth meets relentless energy, provides a distinct setting for those eager to explore beyond the typical tourist paths. Its humid climate fosters lush landscapes, setting the stage for an authentic exploration of Indonesia’s vibrant day-to-day life. Jakarta is not just a city; it’s a living museum displaying the genuine pulse of the country, where historical nuances meet the contemporary bustle. A unique feature of Jakarta is its title as a 'Beta-Global City,' illustrating its significant influence on global trade and finance.
River travel image
Day 23
River travel
Singapore, Singapore image
Day 24
Singapore, Singapore

Spirited Singapore in Southeast Asia is the world’s only sovereign island city-state. The nation’s contemporary identity as a city-island hybrid stems from its colonial history as a British-controlled trading territory, founded by Sir Stamford Raffles in 1819. Today, an amalgamation of multiracial influences give rise to Singapore’s diverse culture - primarily a fusion of Malay, Indian, Chinese and Western traditions. This rich multiculturalism is one of Singapore’s top selling points, drawing in visitors from all over the world who are keen to explore the island’s divergent neighbourhoods, from the colourful pagodas of Chinatown to the ornate temples of Little India. Singapore’s natural landscape is as varied as its culture, with stark contrasts between the luscious, tropical Singapore Botanic Garden and the perfectly sculpted, futuristic “Supertrees” of Gardens by the Bay. A quirky mishmash of old and new, Singapore is without a doubt one of Asia’s most unique and memorable islands with which travellers cannot help but fall in love along a Singapore cruise.

Port Klang, Malaysia image
Day 25
Port Klang, Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur, or KL as locals refer to it, intrigues visitors with its diversity and multicultural character. The city's old quarter features stretches of shop houses that hint at its colonial past, while modern buildings—including the iconic Petronas Towers—give a glimpse of its modern financial ambitions. The city is filled with culturally colorful quarters dedicated to Chinese, Malay, and Indian communities. New shopping malls with designer labels, five-star hotels, and top-notch restaurants also proliferate in this bustling city of 1.6 million.
River travel image
Days 26 - 27
River travel
Laem Chabang, Thailand image
Days 28 - 29
Laem Chabang, Thailand
Laem Chabang, Thailand’s largest port, is not just a commercial hub but a gateway to exploring the less charted beauties of Eastern Thailand. Its tropical climate and proximity to both sea and jungle create a dynamic environment, ideal for those who seek variety in their travels. This port town showcases authentic Thai life, from bustling local markets to serene temple grounds. A unique fact about Laem Chabang is its position near the historic city of Ayutthaya, a link to Thailand’s ancient roots just a day trip away.
Ship Details
Viking Ocean Cruises
Viking Venus

With their sleek, yacht-style bows and teak promenade decks, Viking’s ocean ships are a million miles from the large liners that sail the seas.

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