12 nights onboard Silver Dawn

Southampton to Lisbon

Spend 24 days enjoying the sunshine in the finest regions. Embark from Southampton to Saint Malo. A day at sea leads you to iconic Bordeaux, where you’ll spend three days touring the fabled vineyards. Savour delicious Basque cuisine in Bilbao and learn the rich history of Gijón. Visit Porto and enjoy overnights in Vigo, Lisbon, and Funchal, before you sail to the Canary Islands. An overnight in Cadiz and more sea time completes your voyage.

Leaving from: Southampton
Cruise ship: Silver Dawn
Visiting: Southampton Saint-Malo Bordeaux Bordeaux
Silversea Cruises Logo
Silversea Cruises

Wellness should be about balanced indulgence, not self-sacrifice - that's the philosophy behind Silversea's new programme called Otium, named after the Roman leisure time dedicated to bathing, talking, singing, drinking, eating and relaxing. The easygoing regime includes a 24-hour room-service menu of comfort food, as well as new spa treatments, relaxing baths and hot chocolate served on your balcony.

596
Passengers
411
Crew
2022
Launched
40700t
Tonnage
213m
Length
26m
Width
20kts
Speed
8
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Southampton, England
Day 2
Saint-Malo, France
Days 4 - 6
Bordeaux, France
Day 7
Bilbao, Spain
Day 8
Gijón, Spain
Day 10
Vigo, Spain
Day 11
Porto, Portugal
Days 12 - 13
Lisbon, Portugal
Southampton, England image
Day 1
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Saint-Malo, France image
Day 2
Saint-Malo, France
Thrust out into the sea and bound to the mainland only by tenuous man-made causeways, romantic St-Malo has built a reputation as a breeding ground for phenomenal sailors. Many were fishermen, but others—most notably Jacques Cartier, who claimed Canada for Francis I in 1534—were New World explorers. Still others were corsairs, "sea dogs" paid by the French crown to harass the Limeys across the Channel: legendary ones like Robert Surcouf and Duguay-Trouin helped make St-Malo rich through their pillaging, in the process earning it the nickname "the pirates' city." The St-Malo you see today isn’t quite the one they called home because a weeklong fire in 1944, kindled by retreating Nazis, wiped out nearly all of the old buildings. Restoration work was more painstaking than brilliant, but the narrow streets and granite houses of the Vieille Ville were satisfactorily recreated, enabling St-Malo to regain its role as a busy fishing port, seaside resort, and tourist destination. The ramparts that help define this city figuratively and literally are authentic, and the flames also spared houses along Rue de Pelicot in the Vieille Ville. Battalions of tourists invade this quaint part of town in summer, so arrive off-season if you want to avoid crowds.
Bordeaux, France image
Days 4 - 6
Bordeaux, France
Bordeaux, a city steeped in winemaking tradition, invites you to savor its illustrious past. As the birthplace of renowned vintages, it weaves a tapestry of wine culture that stretches back centuries. Nestled along the Garonne River, Bordeaux enjoys a temperate maritime climate, perfect for viticulture. Beyond its famed vineyards, Bordeaux boasts architectural marvels, including its UNESCO-listed historic center, showcasing the region's rich architectural heritage. As a gateway to the esteemed Bordeaux wine region, cruise lines dock here, allowing travelers to explore prestigious châteaux and sample world-class wines. With its blend of history, wine, and scenic beauty, Bordeaux offers a truly authentic French experience.
Bilbao, Spain image
Day 7
Bilbao, Spain
Bilbao Cruise Terminal serves as a gateway to the heart of Basque culture, situated strategically in the revitalized port area, a testament to the city's industrial past and its dynamic present. The climate here is oceanic, providing visitors with a comfortable atmosphere to explore year-round, often shielded from the extremes of Spanish weather. The terminal is not just a point of transit but a starting place to dive into the local life with nearby attractions like the Ribera Market or the buzzing nightlife of Pozas Street. A unique feature of this terminal is its proximity to the Bilbao Guggenheim Museum, just a stone's throw away, making high art immediately accessible to disembarking passengers and showcasing the city’s commitment to integrating tradition with avant-garde innovations.
Gijón, Spain image
Day 8
Gijón, Spain
The Campo Valdés baths, dating back to the 1st century AD, and other reminders of Gijón's time as an ancient Roman port remain visible downtown. Gijón was almost destroyed in a 14th-century struggle over the Castilian throne, but by the 19th century it was a thriving port and industrial city. The modern-day city is part fishing port, part summer resort, and part university town, packed with cafés, restaurants, and sidrerías.
Vigo, Spain image
Day 10
Vigo, Spain
Dating from Roman times, the Galician city of Vigo has a fine natural harbour and is renowned as the biggest fishing port in the world. It is also full of history - it was in this fjord-like quay that the English and Dutch defeated the French and Spanish fleets in 1702. Today, the attractive marinas stand in contrast to the industrialised areas of the city, while further exploration will reveal the characteristic 17th-century architecture and attractive countryside beyond. The charming Old Town is a delight, with its labyrinth of winding narrow streets and shaded squares. Nearby is the Cathedral city of Tui, and further to the north is the pilgrimage centre of Santiago de Compostela, which can be reached by car in approximately 1¼ hours.
Porto, Portugal image
Day 11
Porto, Portugal

Lively, commercial Oporto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Also called Porto for short, the word easily brings to mind the city's most famous product - port wine. Oporto's strategic location on the north bank of the Douro River has accounted for the town's importance since ancient times.

Lisbon, Portugal image
Days 12 - 13
Lisbon, Portugal

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Ship Details
Silversea Cruises
Silver Dawn

A new Dawn has arrived! Our tenth ultra-luxury ship joined our fleet in April 2022, sailing a worldwide itinerary that promises authentic, immersive experiences.

Find your perfect cruise!
Cabins
All Prices