28 nights onboard Seven Seas Splendor

Splendor Across The Seas

Winners 2022 Best Luxury Ocean Cruise Line

To perfect luxury, Seven Seas Splendor™ elevates every detail, combining exquisite style and comfort with exemplary service, superb cuisine and all-balcony suites. Get to know this newest ship in the Regent Seven Seas Cruises® fleet.

Leaving from: Miami, Florida
Cruise ship: Seven Seas Splendor
Visiting: Miami, Florida Kings Wharf Kings Wharf Horta, Azores
Regent Seven Seas Cruises Logo
Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Regent is almost in a class of its own, offering luxury on an incredible scale with original Picassos, an acre of marble and 500 chandeliers aboard Seven Seas Explorer, Seven Seas Splendor and Seven Seas Grandeur.

The most opulent suites in all three - at around £8,000 a night - feature grand pianos, private bars and even their own spas. The signature Compass Rose restaurant is an absolute must-see.

732
Passengers
567
Crew
2020
Launched
55498t
Tonnage
224m
Length
31m
Width
19kts
Speed
10
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Days 2 - 3
River travel
Days 4 - 5
Kings Wharf, Bermuda
Days 6 - 9
River travel
Day 10
Horta, Azores, Portugal
Day 11
Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal
Day 12
River travel
Day 13
Funchal, Madeira, Portugal
Day 14
River travel
Day 15
Lisbon, Portugal
Day 16
River travel
Day 17
Cádiz, Spain
Day 18
Casablanca, Morocco
Day 19
Tangier, Morocco
Day 20
Málaga, Spain
Day 21
Cartagena, Spain
Day 22
Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Day 23
River travel
Day 24
Civitavecchia, Italy
Day 25
Portoferraio, Italy
Day 26
Livorno, Italy
Day 27
Cannes, France
Day 28
Toulon, France
Day 29
Barcelona, Spain
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
River travel image
Days 2 - 3
River travel
Kings Wharf, Bermuda image
Days 4 - 5
Kings Wharf, Bermuda
You go to heaven if you want - I'd rather stay here in Bermuda!' So gushed Mark Twain in the 19th century, and Bermuda's promise of sun and sea still lures holiday-makers to its shores. Settled by the English Virginia Company in 1609, Bermuda is the oldest and most populous of Britain's remaining overseas territories. These days, celebrities like Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones call Bermuda home. The island is surrounded by a fantastic coral reef that harbours colourful fish and has ensnared scores of shipwrecks, making for memorable diving and snorkelling.
River travel image
Days 6 - 9
River travel
Horta, Azores, Portugal image
Day 10
Horta, Azores, Portugal
Set on the five-sided island of Faial, Horta is decorated with a colourful cacophony of artworks, which have been daubed across its concrete marina by visitors from around the globe. Left behind by sailors, they tell thrilling stories of life on the high seas. Sitting in the midst of the vast Atlantic, 1,100 miles away from the Portuguese mainland, Horta is the ideal pit-stop for yachts traversing the Atlantic, and one of the world's most visited marinas. The tapered, imposing peak of the Pico volcano, on neighbouring Pico Island, provides a glorious backdrop to the jostling yacht masts of the marina. For the ultimate view, however, you'll need to head up to Faial's own volcanic treasure - Caldeira. Look out from this colossal crater, to absorb the extraordinary views, and a demonstration of a volcano's ability to create as well as destroy. The crater is a natural reserve that blooms with wildflowers and lush green scenery, and scattered sky-blue hydrangeas. Flowers spread colour right across these islands - and you can learn more about the native species at the Faial Botanical Garden.
Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal image
Day 11
Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal

The ‘Green Island’ of the Azores is a lush paradise, full of bountiful charms and natural wonders. The capital of the Portuguese archipelago, Ponta Delgada is situated on the south coast of the island of Sao Miguel. Along with green pastures and dramatic landscapes, the Azorean capital also features an impressive 16th century fort and postcard-perfect old town, complete with historic architecture, Portuguese churches and old forts.

River travel image
Day 12
River travel
Funchal, Madeira, Portugal image
Day 13
Funchal, Madeira, Portugal
Formed by a volcanic eruption, Madeira lies in the Gulf Stream, about 500 miles due west of Casablanca. Discovered by Portuguese explorer João Gonçalves Zarco in 1419, this beautiful island became part of Portugal’s vast empire and was named for the dense forest which cloaked it - 'Madeira' means 'wood' in Portuguese. Sugar plantations first brought wealth here, and when King Charles II of England granted an exclusive franchise to sell wine to England and its colonies, many British emigrants were drawn to the capital, Funchal. Today’s travellers come to Madeira for the varied and luxuriant scenery, from mountain slopes covered with vines to picturesque villages and a profusion of wild flowers. The natural beauty of the island has earned it many pseudonyms such as ‘The Floating Garden of the Atlantic’, 'The Island of Eternal Springtime' and ‘God’s Botanical Gardens’ and our selection of excursions aim to show you why.
River travel image
Day 14
River travel
Lisbon, Portugal image
Day 15
Lisbon, Portugal

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

River travel image
Day 16
River travel
Cádiz, Spain image
Day 17
Cádiz, Spain

Believed to be the oldest town on the Iberian Peninsula, the Andalusian port of Cádiz enjoys a stunning location at the edge of a six-mile promontory. The town itself, with 3,000 years of history, is characterised by pretty white houses with balconies often adorned with colourful flowers. As you wander around be sure to take a stroll through the sizeable Plaza de Espãna, with its large monument dedicated to the first Spanish constitution, which was signed here in 1812. Cádiz has two pleasant seafront promenades which boast fine views of the Atlantic Ocean, and has a lovely park, the Parque Genoves, located close to the sea with an open-air theatre and attractive palm garden. Also notable is the neo-Classical cathedral, capped by a golden dome.

Casablanca, Morocco image
Day 18
Casablanca, Morocco

Many of you might will have a picture of Casablanca in your head, that has no doubt been taken from the classic Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman 1942 film – all gin joints, Moroccan souks and old stone medina alleys. But of course, time has gone by and the Casablanca of today may still have an old-world, romantic charm, but it has moved with the times and is now a thriving commercial capital, packed full of cultural attractions, contemporary galleries and top-notch restaurants just waiting to be discovered. The multifaceted port city, which fronts the Atlantic Ocean in western Morocco, combines its French colonial heritage with traditional Arab culture and European Art Deco and modernist architecture.

Tangier, Morocco image
Day 19
Tangier, Morocco
Tangier can trace its origins back to the Phoenicians and ancient Greeks. It was named after Tinge, the mother of Hercules’ son, and its beginnings are embedded in mythology. It was subsequently a Roman province, and after Vandal and Byzantine influences, was occupied by the Arabs with Spain, Portugal, France and England also playing a part in the city’s history. With such a diverse past it is perhaps not surprising that Tangier is such an individual city. Overlooking the Straits of Gibraltar, the city lies on a bay between two promontories. With its old Kasbah, panoramic views, elegant buildings, squares and places of interest, there is much to discover in both the new and old parts of the city.
Málaga, Spain image
Day 20
Málaga, Spain
As you sail into Malaga you will notice what an idyllic setting the city enjoys on the famous Costa del Sol. To the east of this provincial capital, the coast along the region of La Axarqua is scattered with villages, farmland and sleepy fishing hamlets - the epitome of traditional rural Spain. To the west stretches a continuous city where the razzmatazz and bustle creates a colourful contrast that is easily recognisable as the Costa del Sol. Surrounding the region, the Penibéetica Mountains provide an attractive backdrop overlooking the lower terraced slopes which yield olives and almonds. This spectacular mountain chain shelters the province from cold northerly winds, giving it a reputation as a therapeutic and exotic place in which to escape from cold northern climes. Malaga is also the gateway to many of Andalusia's enchanting historic villages, towns and cities.
Cartagena, Spain image
Day 21
Cartagena, Spain
A Mediterranean city and naval station located in the Region of Murcia, southeastern Spain, Cartagena’s sheltered bay has attracted sailors for centuries. The Carthaginians founded the city in 223BC and named it Cartago Nova; it later became a prosperous Roman colony, and a Byzantine trading centre. The city has been the main Spanish Mediterranean naval base since the reign of King Philip II, and is still surrounded by walls built during this period. Cartagena’s importance grew with the arrival of the Spanish Bourbons in the 18th century, when the Navidad Fortress was constructed to protect the harbour. In recent years, traces of the city’s fascinating past have been brought to light: a well-preserved Roman Theatre was discovered in 1988, and this has now been restored and opened to the public. During your free time, you may like to take a mini-cruise around Cartagena's historic harbour: these operate several times a day, take approximately 40 minutes and do not need to be booked in advance. Full details will be available at the port.
Palma de Mallorca, Spain image
Day 22
Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Palma de Mallorca, the largest city on the island of Mallorca, is the capital of Spain’s Balearic Islands and a popular destination among Mediterranean cruisers. The sun-kissed island combines a vibrant city centre and shopping areas with a charming old town, known in Spanish as El Casco Antiguo, where many tourist hotspots can be found. With stunning views allied to great beaches, Gothic, Moorish and Renaissance architecture, as well as tasty regional food, Palma ticks all the boxes.

River travel image
Day 23
River travel
Civitavecchia, Italy image
Day 24
Civitavecchia, Italy

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here.

Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Portoferraio, Italy image
Day 25
Portoferraio, Italy
Elba is the Tuscan archipelago's largest island, but it resembles nearby verdant Corsica more than it does its rocky Italian sisters, thanks to a network of underground springs that keep it lush and green. It's this combination of semitropical vegetation and dramatic mountain scenery—unusual in the Mediterranean—that has made Elba so prized for so long, and the island's uniqueness continues to draw boatloads of visitors throughout the warm months. A car is very useful for getting around the island, but public buses stop at most towns several times a day; the tourist office has timetables.
Livorno, Italy image
Day 26
Livorno, Italy

Livorno is one of central Italy's busiest economic hubs. Known for its massive seaport and epic medieval fortifications, Livorno has another side where freshly caught seafood, urban waterways, vibrant nightlife, and modern museums are the order of the day.

Visitors who arrive by cruise ship often consider Livorno as only a stopover before venturing to more popular destinations. Don't become one of those visitors, as you are missing out!

We'd recommend exploring Livorno on foot, absorbing the culture and relaxing in the charms of Italy's lesser-known coastal city.

Cannes, France image
Day 27
Cannes, France
Cannes is pampered with the luxurious year-round climate that has made it one of the most popular resorts in Europe. Cannes was an important sentinel site for the monks who established themselves on Île St-Honorat in the Middle Ages. Its bay served as nothing more than a fishing port until in 1834 an English aristocrat, Lord Brougham, fell in love with the site during an emergency stopover with a sick daughter. He had a home built here and returned every winter for a sun cure—a ritual quickly picked up by his peers. Between the popularity of Le Train Blue transporting wealthy passengers from Calais, and the introduction in 1936 of France's first paid holidays, Cannes became the destination, a tasteful and expensive breeding ground for the upper-upscale.Cannes has been further glamorized by the ongoing success of its annual film festival, as famous as Hollywood's Academy Awards. About the closest many of us will get to feeling like a film star is a stroll here along La Croisette, the iconic promenade that gracefully curves the wave-washed sand coastline, peppered with chic restaurants and prestigious private beaches. This is precisely the sort of place for which the French invented the verb flâner (to dawdle, saunter): strewn with palm trees and poseurs, its fancy boutiques and status-symbol grand hotels—including the Carlton, the legendary backdrop to Grace Kelly in To Catch a Thief —all vying for the custom of the Louis Vuitton set. This legend is, to many, the heart and soul of the Côte d'Azur.
Toulon, France image
Day 28
Toulon, France
Barcelona, Spain image
Day 29
Barcelona, Spain
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Ship Details
Regent Seven Seas Cruises
Seven Seas Splendor

To perfect luxury, Seven Seas Splendor™ elevates every detail, combining exquisite style and comfort with exemplary service, superb cuisine and all-balcony suites. Get to know this newest ship in the Regent Seven Seas Cruises® fleet.

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