7 nights onboard Valiant Lady

Valiant New Year's Ahoy!

Winners 2022 John Honeywell Best ship launch
Winners 2022 Best for Cuisine
Set sail into the new year on our eight-night voyage across the Caribbean. After a day in Puerto Plata, 10 pm (or later) departures from San Juan, St. Croix and The Beach Club at Bimini leave plenty of time to wander off the beaten path and check off a few more things from your year-end bucket list.
Leaving from: San Juan (Puerto Rico)
Cruise ship: Valiant Lady
Visiting: San Juan (Puerto Rico) Philipsburg Basseterre, Saint Kitts Castries
Virgin Voyages Logo
Virgin Voyages

Almost everything is different on this brash new entry to the cruising market, including an emphasis on adult relations, gym time, and self-indulgent social activity.

Sir Richard Branson's adults-only, bright red-liveried new ship also has a fantastic nightclub and a food court instead of a buffet. There are exciting plans for a fleet of new ships on the horizon, to join the already established fleet of cruise ships that go against the grain.

2770
Passengers
1150
Crew
2021
Launched
110000t
Tonnage
278m
Length
38m
Width
22kts
Speed
17
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico
Embark.
Day 2
Philipsburg, Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
. Depart 1900
Day 3
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
. Depart 1800
Day 4
Castries, Saint Lucia
. Depart 1800
Day 5
Bridgetown, Barbados
. Depart 2000
Day 7
Frederiksted, Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
. Depart 1700
Day 8
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico
Disembark.
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico image
Day 1
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico
If you associate Puerto Rico's capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island's nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de León had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location. In 1521, after he became the first colonial governor, Ponce de León switched the name of the island—which was then called San Juan Bautista in honor of St. John the Baptist—with that of the settlement of Puerto Rico ("rich port").Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico's administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain's hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area now known as Old San Juan. The area is filled with cobblestone streets and brightly painted, colonial-era structures, and its fortifications have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Old San Juan is a monument to the past, but most of the rest of the city is planted firmly in the 21st century and draws migrants island-wide and from farther afield to jobs in its businesses and industries. The city captivates residents and visitors alike with its vibrant lifestyle as well as its balmy beaches, pulsing nightclubs, globe-spanning restaurants, and world-class museums. Once you set foot in this city, you may never want to leave.
Philipsburg, Sint Maarten (Dutch part) image
Day 2
Philipsburg, Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
The capital of Dutch St. Maarten stretches about a mile (1½ km) along an isthmus between Great Bay and the Salt Pond and has five parallel streets. Most of the village's dozens of shops and restaurants are on Front Street, narrow and cobblestone, closest to Great Bay. It's generally congested when cruise ships are in port, because of its many duty-free shops and several casinos. Little lanes called steegjes connect Front Street with Back Street, which has fewer shops and considerably less congestion. Along the beach is a ½-mile-long (1-km-long) boardwalk with restaurants and several Wi-Fi hot spots.Wathey Square (pronounced watty) is in the heart of the village. Directly across from the square are the town hall and the courthouse, in a striking white building with cupola. The structure was built in 1793 and has served as the commander's home, a fire station, a jail, and a post office. The streets surrounding the square are lined with hotels, duty-free shops, restaurants, and cafés. The Captain Hodge Pier, just off the square, is a good spot to view Great Bay and the beach that stretches alongside.
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis image
Day 3
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Mountainous St. Kitts, the first English settlement in the Leeward Islands, crams some stunning scenery into its 65 square miles (168 square km). Vast, brilliant green fields of sugarcane (the former cash crop, now slowly being replanted) run to the shore. The fertile, lush island has some fascinating natural and historical attractions: a rain forest replete with waterfalls, thick vines, and secret trails; a central mountain range dominated by the 3,792-foot Mt. Liamuiga, whose crater has long been dormant; and Brimstone Hill, known in the 18th century as the Gibraltar of the West Indies. St. Kitts and Nevis, along with Anguilla, achieved self-government as an associated state of Great Britain in 1967. In 1983 St. Kitts and Nevis became an independent nation. English with a strong West Indian lilt is spoken here. People are friendly but shy; always ask before you take photographs. Also, be sure to wear wraps or shorts over beach attire when you're in public places.
Castries, Saint Lucia image
Day 4
Castries, Saint Lucia
Castries - the vibrant capital of Saint Lucia - offers a world of adventure. Explore the bustling streets of the lively city center, where local markets brim with colorful crafts and spices. Discover the island's rich history at landmarks like the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and the historic Morne Fortune. Embark on an exhilarating rainforest trek to the iconic Pitons, or soak up the sun on pristine beaches like Vigie and Reduit. Dive into the crystal-clear waters for snorkeling or dive excursions, or indulge in a relaxing spa day at one of the luxurious resorts. Castries promises unforgettable experiences for every traveler.
Bridgetown, Barbados image
Day 5
Bridgetown, Barbados
The history of Bridgetown Cruise Terminal is a fine blend of maritime trade and colonial legacy. Established as a vital hub for sugar and rum exports during the colonial era, it grew into a bustling port welcoming ships from around the world. Landmark events, such as the abolition of slavery and Barbados' independence, shaped its development, transforming it into the modern cruise terminal that stands today, blending historic charm with modern amenities.
Frederiksted, Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands image
Day 7
Frederiksted, Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
. Depart 1700
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico image
Day 8
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico
If you associate Puerto Rico's capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island's nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de León had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location. In 1521, after he became the first colonial governor, Ponce de León switched the name of the island—which was then called San Juan Bautista in honor of St. John the Baptist—with that of the settlement of Puerto Rico ("rich port").Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico's administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain's hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area now known as Old San Juan. The area is filled with cobblestone streets and brightly painted, colonial-era structures, and its fortifications have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Old San Juan is a monument to the past, but most of the rest of the city is planted firmly in the 21st century and draws migrants island-wide and from farther afield to jobs in its businesses and industries. The city captivates residents and visitors alike with its vibrant lifestyle as well as its balmy beaches, pulsing nightclubs, globe-spanning restaurants, and world-class museums. Once you set foot in this city, you may never want to leave.
Ship Details
Virgin Voyages
Valiant Lady

With a name derived from the Latin, "valere" (which means to be strong) our second lady ship calls Barcelona her home - setting sail through the Mediterranean in the summers and spending her winters down in the Caribbean.

Find your perfect cruise!
Cabins
All Prices