7 nights onboard Wind Spirit

Windward Island Delights

This is the Caribbean of days gone by - deep blue waters, quiet coves and tropical islands dotted with powdery beaches and lush green hillsides. Sail from the rugged natural beauty of St. Lucia to little-known isles that are off the tourist radar. From colorful Bequia and Mayreau in St. Vincent & the Grenadines to the open-air markets of exotic St. George's, you'll discover a part of the Caribbean that remains authentic and unspoiled. This is everything that makes the Caribbean synonymous with paradise.
Leaving from: Bridgetown
Cruise ship: Wind Spirit
Visiting: Bridgetown Basseterre, Saint Kitts Terre-de-Haut Roseau
Windstar Cruises Logo
Windstar Cruises

Windstar Cruises operates a fleet of small luxury cruise ships. The cruise line has six yachts - three of which are masted sailing ships - and offers laid-back luxury with a tinge of historic seafaring adventure.

Wind Star and Wind Spirit each carry 148 guests, whereas Wind Surf carries 342. 'Power yachts' Star Pride, Star Breeze and Star Legend all carry 312 passengers. It's a unique experience, by all means!

148
Passengers
101
Crew
1998
Launched
2012
Last refit
5307t
Tonnage
110m
Length
15m
Width
10kts
Speed
4
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Bridgetown, Barbados
Day 3
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Day 4
Terre-de-Haut, Guadeloupe
Day 5
Roseau, Dominica
Day 6
Trois-Ilets, Martinique
Day 7
Pigeon Island, Saint Lucia
Day 8
Bridgetown, Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados image
Day 1
Bridgetown, Barbados
The history of Bridgetown Cruise Terminal is a fine blend of maritime trade and colonial legacy. Established as a vital hub for sugar and rum exports during the colonial era, it grew into a bustling port welcoming ships from around the world. Landmark events, such as the abolition of slavery and Barbados' independence, shaped its development, transforming it into the modern cruise terminal that stands today, blending historic charm with modern amenities.
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis image
Day 3
Basseterre, Saint Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Mountainous St. Kitts, the first English settlement in the Leeward Islands, crams some stunning scenery into its 65 square miles (168 square km). Vast, brilliant green fields of sugarcane (the former cash crop, now slowly being replanted) run to the shore. The fertile, lush island has some fascinating natural and historical attractions: a rain forest replete with waterfalls, thick vines, and secret trails; a central mountain range dominated by the 3,792-foot Mt. Liamuiga, whose crater has long been dormant; and Brimstone Hill, known in the 18th century as the Gibraltar of the West Indies. St. Kitts and Nevis, along with Anguilla, achieved self-government as an associated state of Great Britain in 1967. In 1983 St. Kitts and Nevis became an independent nation. English with a strong West Indian lilt is spoken here. People are friendly but shy; always ask before you take photographs. Also, be sure to wear wraps or shorts over beach attire when you're in public places.
Terre-de-Haut, Guadeloupe image
Day 4
Terre-de-Haut, Guadeloupe
Roseau, Dominica image
Day 5
Roseau, Dominica
Although it's one of the smallest capitals in the Caribbean, Roseau has the highest concentration of inhabitants of any town in the eastern Caribbean. Caribbean vernacular architecture and a bustling marketplace transport visitors back in time. Although you can walk the entire town in about an hour, you'll get a much better feel for the place on a leisurely stroll. For some years now, the Society for Historical Architectural Preservation and Enhancement (SHAPE) has organized programs and projects to preserve the city's architectural heritage. Several interesting buildings have already been restored. Lilac House, on Kennedy Avenue, has three types of gingerbread fretwork, latticed verandah railings, and heavy hurricane shutters. The J.W. Edwards Building, at the corner of Old and King George V sreets, has a stone base and a wooden second-floor gallery. The Old Market Plaza is the center of Roseau's historic district, which was laid out by the French on a radial plan rather than a grid, so streets such as Hanover, King George V, and Old radiate from this area. South of the marketplace is the Fort Young Hotel, built as a British fort in the 18th century; the nearby statehouse, public library, and Anglican cathedral are also worth a visit. New developments at the bay front on Dame M.E. Charles Boulevard have brightened up the waterfront.
Trois-Ilets, Martinique image
Day 6
Trois-Ilets, Martinique
Pigeon Island, Saint Lucia image
Day 7
Pigeon Island, Saint Lucia
Bridgetown, Barbados image
Day 8
Bridgetown, Barbados
The history of Bridgetown Cruise Terminal is a fine blend of maritime trade and colonial legacy. Established as a vital hub for sugar and rum exports during the colonial era, it grew into a bustling port welcoming ships from around the world. Landmark events, such as the abolition of slavery and Barbados' independence, shaped its development, transforming it into the modern cruise terminal that stands today, blending historic charm with modern amenities.
Ship Details
Windstar Cruises
Wind Spirit

The Wind Spirit is a sleek, 4-masted sailing ship accommodating 148 guests. With four decks and a gross tonnage of 5,736, Wind Spirit feels like your own private small ship.

Find your perfect cruise!
Cabins
All Prices