Italy, France and Spain

With stays in Rome and Barcelona

Luxury Cruise and Stay

  • 10 nights aboard the Norwegian Dawn on All-Inclusive basis.
  • Premium All-Inclusive drinks package & Bonus specialty dining package included.
  • Airport transfers included.
  • Upgrade to an Ocean View cabin from £300pp.
  • Upgrade to a Balcony cabin from £900pp.
  • Upgrade to a Club Balcony Suite from £1300pp.
Prices Available
25th April 2024
£1699
  • Departure Date: 25th April 2024
  • Total Nights: 12 Nights
  • Cruise: Norwegian Dawn
  • Package Type: Cruise and Stay
  • Includes Outbound Flight
  • Includes Inbound Flight
From
£1699 *pp
 logo
2340
Passengers
1032
Crew
2002
Launched
2016
Last refit
92250t
Tonnage
294m
Length
38m
Width
25kts
Speed
11
Decks
USD
Currency
Overview
  • done Return Flights from the UK
  • done 10-night all-inclusive cruise
  • done 1-night Rome hotel stay
  • done 1-night Barcelona hotel stay
  • done Airport transfers included
  • done Premium All-Inclusive drinks package & Bonus specialty dining package included
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Outbound flight from London, UK to Rome, Italy
Outbound flight from London, UK to Rome, Italy
Day 1
Rome hotel stay
1-night hotel stay in Rome
Day 2
Embark and set sail
Embark at Rome (Civitavecchia) and set sail
Day 3
Salerno, Italy
Visit Salerno, Italy
Day 4-5
Florence/Pisa (Livorno)
Visit Florence/Pisa (Livorno), Italy
Day 6
Genoa
Visit Genoa, Italy
Day 7
Cannes
Visit Cannes, France
Day 8
Saint-Tropez
Visit Saint-Tropez, France
Day 9
Palma (Majorca)
Visit Palma (Majorca), Spain
Day 10
Ibiza
Visit Ibiza, Spain
Day 11
Valencia
Visit Valencia, Spain
Day 12
Disembark at Barcelona
Disembark at Barcelona
Day 12
Barcelona hotel stay
1-night hotel stay in Barcelona
Day 13
Return flight to the UK
Return flight to the UK
Outbound flight from London, UK to Rome, Italy image
Day 1
Outbound flight from London, UK to Rome, Italy
Outbound flight from London, UK to Rome, Italy
Rome hotel stay image
Day 1
Rome hotel stay
1-night hotel stay in Rome
Embark and set sail image
Day 2
Embark and set sail

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here.

Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Salerno, Italy image
Day 3
Salerno, Italy
Salerno is an Italian city located on the Gulf of Salerno. Famous for being home to the first medical university, Salerno is a great destination for anyone looking for gorgeous sea views filled with sunshine and Italian food.
Florence/Pisa (Livorno) image
Day 4-5
Florence/Pisa (Livorno)

Livorno is one of central Italy's busiest economic hubs. Known for its massive seaport and epic medieval fortifications, Livorno has another side where freshly caught seafood, urban waterways, vibrant nightlife, and modern museums are the order of the day.

Visitors who arrive by cruise ship often consider Livorno as only a stopover before venturing to more popular destinations. Don't become one of those visitors, as you are missing out!

We'd recommend exploring Livorno on foot, absorbing the culture and relaxing in the charms of Italy's lesser-known coastal city.

Genoa image
Day 6
Genoa
Genoa is a port city in the Northwest of Italy. Home to the Genoa Aquarium, famous for having the largest exposition of biodiversity in Europe, the city is also a great place to visit for anyone interested in architecture.
Cannes image
Day 7
Cannes
Cannes is pampered with the luxurious year-round climate that has made it one of the most popular resorts in Europe. Cannes was an important sentinel site for the monks who established themselves on Île St-Honorat in the Middle Ages. Its bay served as nothing more than a fishing port until in 1834 an English aristocrat, Lord Brougham, fell in love with the site during an emergency stopover with a sick daughter. He had a home built here and returned every winter for a sun cure—a ritual quickly picked up by his peers. Between the popularity of Le Train Blue transporting wealthy passengers from Calais, and the introduction in 1936 of France's first paid holidays, Cannes became the destination, a tasteful and expensive breeding ground for the upper-upscale.Cannes has been further glamorized by the ongoing success of its annual film festival, as famous as Hollywood's Academy Awards. About the closest many of us will get to feeling like a film star is a stroll here along La Croisette, the iconic promenade that gracefully curves the wave-washed sand coastline, peppered with chic restaurants and prestigious private beaches. This is precisely the sort of place for which the French invented the verb flâner (to dawdle, saunter): strewn with palm trees and poseurs, its fancy boutiques and status-symbol grand hotels—including the Carlton, the legendary backdrop to Grace Kelly in To Catch a Thief —all vying for the custom of the Louis Vuitton set. This legend is, to many, the heart and soul of the Côte d'Azur.
Saint-Tropez image
Day 8
Saint-Tropez
At first glance, it really doesn't look all that impressive. There's a pretty port with cafés charging €5 for a coffee and a picturesque old town in sugared-almond hues, but there are many prettier in the hills nearby. There are sandy beaches, rare enough on the Riviera, and old-fashioned squares with plane trees and pétanque players, but these are a dime a dozen throughout Provence. So what made St-Tropez an internationally known locale? Two words: Brigitte Bardot. When this pulpeuse (voluptuous) teenager showed up in St-Tropez on the arm of Roger Vadim in 1956 to film And God Created Woman, the heads of the world snapped around. Neither the gentle descriptions of writer Guy de Maupassant (1850–93), nor the watercolor tones of Impressionist Paul Signac (1863–1935), nor the stream of painters who followed (including Matisse and Bonnard) could focus the world's attention on this seaside hamlet as did this one sensual woman in a scarf, Ray-Bans, and capris. Vanity Fair ran a big article, "Saint Tropez Babylon," detailing the over-the-top petrodollar parties, megayachts, and Beyoncé–d paparazzi. But don't be turned off: the next year, Stewart, Tabori & Chang released an elegant coffee-table book, Houses of St-Tropez, packed with photos of supremely tasteful and pretty residences, many occupied by fashion designers, artists, and writers. Once a hangout for Colette, Anaïs Nin, and Françoise Sagan, the town still earns its old moniker, the "Montparnasse of the Mediterranean." Yet you might be surprised to find that this byword for billionaires is so small and insulated. The lack of train service, casinos, and chain hotels keeps it that way. Yet fame, in a sense, came too fast for St-Trop. Unlike the chic resorts farther east, it didn't have the decades-old reputation of the sort that would attract visitors all year around. For a good reason: its location on the south side of the gulf puts it at the mercy of the terrible mistral winter winds. So, in summer the crowds descend and the prices rise into the stratosphere. In July and August, you must be carefree about the sordid matter of cash. After all, at the most Dionysian nightclub in town, a glass of tap water goes for $37 and when the mojo really gets going, billionaires think nothing of "champagne-spraying" the partying crowds—think World Series celebrations but with $1,000 bottles of Roederer Cristal instead of Gatorade. Complaining about summer crowds, overpricing, and lack of customer service has become a tourist sport and yet this is what makes St-Tropez—described by the French daily newspaper Le Figaro as the place you can see "the greatest number of faces per square meter"—as intriguing as it is seductive.
Palma (Majorca) image
Day 9
Palma (Majorca)

Palma de Mallorca, the largest city on the island of Mallorca, is the capital of Spain’s Balearic Islands and a popular destination among Mediterranean cruisers. The sun-kissed island combines a vibrant city centre and shopping areas with a charming old town, known in Spanish as El Casco Antiguo, where many tourist hotspots can be found. With stunning views allied to great beaches, Gothic, Moorish and Renaissance architecture, as well as tasty regional food, Palma ticks all the boxes.

Ibiza image
Day 10
Ibiza
Hedonistic and historic, Eivissa (Ibiza, in Castilian) is a city jam-packed with cafés, nightspots, and trendy shops; looming over it are the massive stone walls of Dalt Vila —the medieval city declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999—and its Gothic cathedral. Squeezed between the north walls of the old city and the harbor is Sa Penya, a long labyrinth of stone-paved streets that offer some of the city's best offbeat shopping, snacking, and exploring. The tourist information office on Vara de Rey has a useful map of walks through the old city.
Valencia image
Day 11
Valencia
Valencia, Spain's third-largest municipality, is a proud city with a thriving nightlife and restaurant scene, quality museums, and spectacular contemporary architecture, juxtaposed with a thoroughly charming historic quarter, making it a popular destination year in year out. During the Civil War, it was the last seat of the Republican Loyalist government (1935–36), holding out against Franco’s National forces until the country fell to 40 years of dictatorship. Today it represents the essence of contemporary Spain—daring design and architecture along with experimental cuisine—but remains deeply conservative and proud of its traditions. Though it faces the Mediterranean, Valencia's history and geography have been defined most significantly by the River Turia and the fertile huerta that surrounds it.The city has been fiercely contested ever since it was founded by the Greeks. El Cid captured Valencia from the Moors in 1094 and won his strangest victory here in 1099: he died in the battle, but his corpse was strapped into his saddle and so frightened the besieging Moors that it caused their complete defeat. In 1102 his widow, Jimena, was forced to return the city to Moorish rule; Jaume I finally drove them out in 1238. Modern Valencia was best known for its frequent disastrous floods until the River Turia was diverted to the south in the late 1950s. Since then the city has been on a steady course of urban beautification. The lovely bridges that once spanned the Turia look equally graceful spanning a wandering municipal park, and the spectacularly futuristic Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències (City of Arts and Sciences), most of it designed by Valencia-born architect Santiago Calatrava, has at last created an exciting architectural link between this river town and the Mediterranean. If you're in Valencia, an excursion to Albufera Nature Park is a worthwhile day trip.
Disembark at Barcelona image
Day 12
Disembark at Barcelona
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Barcelona hotel stay image
Day 12
Barcelona hotel stay
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Return flight to the UK image
Day 13
Return flight to the UK
Return flight to the UK
Ship Details
Your Hotel Stay

Rome Hotel Details Confirmed By Travel Center On Confirmation

star star star star 4 star hotel
Total Nights: 1 Night Stay
Description:
The hotel will be confirmed on booking with Travel Center

Barcelona Hotel Details Confirmed By Travel Center On Confirmation

star star star star 4 star hotel
Total Nights: 1 Night Stay
Description:
The hotel will be confirmed on booking with Travel Center
Flights Included

Outbound Flight

Departure Date:
25th April 2024
Location:
Outbound flight from London, UK to Rome, Italy

Inbound Flight

Arrival Date:
07th May 2024
Location:
Inbound flight from Barcelona, Spain to London, UK
Customer Reviews
4.2
out of 4 customer reviews
Cruise Overall
4
Ship
4
Dining
4
Service Onboard
4.5
Accomodation
4.5
Public Rooms
4
Embark & Disembark
4
Shore Excursions
4.3
Value For Money
4.3
Prices from
£1699 *pp