14 nights onboard Seven Seas Voyager

Castles & Cathedrals

Winners 2022 Best Luxury Ocean Cruise Line

Discover the wide variety of inviting spaces and activities on Seven Seas Voyager®. Sip fresh java at Deck 5’s Coffee Connection, run on the open-air track on Deck 12, or head to Serene Spa & Wellness™ spa on Deck 6 for some pampering.

Leaving from: Lisbon
Cruise ship: Seven Seas Voyager
Visiting: Lisbon Porto Vilagarcía de Arousa La Coruña
Regent Seven Seas Cruises Logo
Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Regent is almost in a class of its own, offering luxury on an incredible scale with original Picassos, an acre of marble and 500 chandeliers aboard Seven Seas Explorer, Seven Seas Splendor and Seven Seas Grandeur.

The most opulent suites in all three - at around £8,000 a night - feature grand pianos, private bars and even their own spas. The signature Compass Rose restaurant is an absolute must-see.

680
Passengers
469
Crew
2003
Launched
2016
Last refit
42363t
Tonnage
204m
Length
29m
Width
20kts
Speed
8
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Lisbon, Portugal
Day 2
Porto, Portugal
Day 3
Vilagarcía de Arousa, Spain
Day 4
La Coruña, Spain
Day 5
Bilbao, Spain
Day 6
Saint-Jean-de-Luz, France
Days 7 - 8
Montoir-de-Bretagne, France
Day 9
Concarneau, France
Day 10
Brest, France
Day 11
Saint Peter Port, Guernsey
Day 12
Honfleur, France
Day 13
Zeebrugge, Belgium
Days 14 - 15
Antwerp, Belgium
Lisbon, Portugal image
Day 1
Lisbon, Portugal

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Porto, Portugal image
Day 2
Porto, Portugal

Lively, commercial Oporto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Also called Porto for short, the word easily brings to mind the city's most famous product - port wine. Oporto's strategic location on the north bank of the Douro River has accounted for the town's importance since ancient times.

Vilagarcía de Arousa, Spain image
Day 3
Vilagarcía de Arousa, Spain
La Coruña, Spain image
Day 4
La Coruña, Spain

Situated on the northwestern tip of the Iberian Peninsula, the city of La Coruña (or A Coruña, its official name) is the closest European port to New York. And perhaps in keeping with its location, the coastal city itself is charming blend of old and new, filled with culture, splendid architecture and fascinating museums, along with pristine beaches and open spaces. La Coruña is also the gateway to Galicia, one of the most verdant and scenic regions in Spain.

Bilbao, Spain image
Day 5
Bilbao, Spain
Time in Bilbao (Bilbo, in Euskera) may be recorded as BG or AG (Before Guggenheim or After Guggenheim). Never has a single monument of art and architecture so radically changed a city. Frank Gehry's stunning museum, Norman Foster's sleek subway system, the Santiago Calatrava glass footbridge and airport, the leafy César Pelli Abandoibarra park and commercial complex next to the Guggenheim, and the Philippe Starck AlhóndigaBilbao cultural center have contributed to an unprecedented cultural revolution in what was once the industry capital of the Basque Country.Greater Bilbao contains almost 1 million inhabitants, nearly half the total population of the Basque Country. Founded in 1300 by Vizcayan noble Diego López de Haro, Bilbao became an industrial center in the mid-19th century, largely because of the abundance of minerals in the surrounding hills. An affluent industrial class grew up here, as did the working class in suburbs that line the Margen Izquierda (Left Bank) of the Nervión estuary.Bilbao's new attractions get more press, but the city's old treasures still quietly line the banks of the rust-color Nervión River. The Casco Viejo (Old Quarter)—also known as Siete Calles (Seven Streets)—is a charming jumble of shops, bars, and restaurants on the river's Right Bank, near the Puente del Arenal bridge. This elegant proto-Bilbao nucleus was carefully restored after devastating floods in 1983. Throughout the Casco Viejo are ancient mansions emblazoned with family coats of arms, wooden doors, and fine ironwork balconies. The most interesting square is the 64-arch Plaza Nueva, where an outdoor market is pitched every Sunday morning.Walking the banks of the Nervión is a satisfying jaunt. After all, this was how—while out on a morning jog—Guggenheim director Thomas Krens first discovered the perfect spot for his project, nearly opposite the right bank's Deusto University. From the Palacio de Euskalduna upstream to the colossal Mercado de la Ribera, parks and green zones line the river. César Pelli's Abandoibarra project fills in the half mile between the Guggenheim and the Euskalduna bridge with a series of parks, the Deusto University library, the Meliá Bilbao Hotel, and a major shopping center.On the left bank, the wide, late-19th-century boulevards of the Ensanche neighborhood, such as Gran Vía (the main shopping artery) and Alameda de Mazarredo, are the city's more formal face. Bilbao's cultural institutions include, along with the Guggenheim, a major museum of fine arts (the Museo de Bellas Artes) and an opera society (Asociación Bilbaína de Amigos de la Ópera, or ABAO) with 7,000 members from Spain and southern France. In addition, epicureans have long ranked Bilbao's culinary offerings among the best in Spain. Don't miss a chance to ride the trolley line, the Euskotram, for a trip along the river from Atxuri Station to Basurto's San Mamés soccer stadium, reverently dubbed "la Catedral del Fútbol" (the Cathedral of Football).
Saint-Jean-de-Luz, France image
Day 6
Saint-Jean-de-Luz, France
Montoir-de-Bretagne, France image
Days 7 - 8
Montoir-de-Bretagne, France
Concarneau, France image
Day 9
Concarneau, France
Brest, France image
Day 10
Brest, France
Saint Peter Port, Guernsey image
Day 11
Saint Peter Port, Guernsey
Cobblestone streets, blooming floral displays, and tiny churches welcome you to this wonderfully pretty harbour. The town of St Peter Port is as pretty as they come, with glowing flower displays painting practically every street corner and window-ledge with colour. As the capital, and main port of Guernsey, St Peter Port puts all of the island’s gorgeous beaches, wonderful history and inspiring stories at your fingertips. Feel the gut punch of the midday gun firing at Castle Cornet, which stands guard over one of the world's prettiest ports. This 800-year-old, Medieval castle offers staggering views of the harbour from its imposing, craggy island location, and you can look out across to the looming shorelines of the other Channel Islands from its weathered battlements. With four well-tended gardens, and five museums offering a rich overview of Guernsey's history, you’ll want to leave a few hours aside to explore the many treasures that lie within the castle’s walls.
Honfleur, France image
Day 12
Honfleur, France
Honfleur, the most picturesque of the Côte Fleurie's seaside towns, is a time-burnished place with a surplus of half-timber houses and cobbled streets that are lined with a stunning selection of stylish boutiques. Much of its Renaissance architecture remains intact—especially around the 17th-century Vieux Bassin harbor, where the water is fronted on one side by two-story stone houses with low, sloping roofs and on the other by tall slate-topped houses with wooden facades. Maritime expeditions (including some of the first voyages to Canada) departed from here; later, Impressionists were inspired to capture it on canvas. But the town as a whole has become increasingly crowded since the Pont de Normandie opened in 1995. Providing a direct link with Upper Normandy, the world's sixth-largest cable-stayed bridge is supported by two concrete pylons taller than the Eiffel Tower and designed to resist winds of 257 kph (160 mph).
Zeebrugge, Belgium image
Day 13
Zeebrugge, Belgium
In 1895 work began to construct a new seaport and harbour next to the tiny village of Zeebrugge, situated on the North Sea coast. Today the fast-expanding port of Zeebrugge is one of the busiest in Europe and its marina is Belgium’s most important fishing port. Many attempts were made to destroy this important port during both World Wars. Zeebrugge is ideally located for discovering the historic city of Bruges, and delightful seaside resorts with long sandy beaches can be visited by using the trams that run the whole length of the Belgian coast. Please note that no food may be taken ashore in Belgium. We shall not be offering shuttle buses to Bruges, but you may visit the city on an optional excursion: those visiting Bruges should note that there may be quite a long walk from the coach to the town centre.
Antwerp, Belgium image
Days 14 - 15
Antwerp, Belgium
Explore Antwerp, Belgium's second city. Known for its diamond cutting industry, fashion and the many great artists that lived in its vicinity, Antwerp is a city focused on art and culture.
Ship Details
Regent Seven Seas Cruises
Seven Seas Voyager

Discover the wide variety of inviting spaces and activities on Seven Seas Voyager®. Sip fresh java at Deck 5’s Coffee Connection, run on the open-air track on Deck 12, or head to Serene Spa & Wellness™ spa on Deck 6 for some pampering.

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