25 nights onboard Seven Seas Voyager

West African Wonders

Winners 2022 Best Luxury Ocean Cruise Line

Discover the wide variety of inviting spaces and activities on Seven Seas Voyager®. Sip fresh java at Deck 5’s Coffee Connection, run on the open-air track on Deck 12, or head to Serene Spa & Wellness™ spa on Deck 6 for some pampering.

Leaving from: Barcelona
Cruise ship: Seven Seas Voyager
Visiting: Barcelona Cádiz Casablanca Agadir
Regent Seven Seas Cruises Logo
Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Regent is almost in a class of its own, offering luxury on an incredible scale with original Picassos, an acre of marble and 500 chandeliers aboard Seven Seas Explorer, Seven Seas Splendor and Seven Seas Grandeur.

The most opulent suites in all three - at around £8,000 a night - feature grand pianos, private bars and even their own spas. The signature Compass Rose restaurant is an absolute must-see.

680
Passengers
469
Crew
2003
Launched
2016
Last refit
42363t
Tonnage
204m
Length
29m
Width
20kts
Speed
8
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Barcelona, Spain
Day 2
River travel
Day 3
Cádiz, Spain
Day 4
Casablanca, Morocco
Day 5
Agadir, Morocco
Day 6
Arrecife, Lanzarote, Spain
Days 7 - 8
River travel
Day 9
Porto Grande, Cape Verde
Day 10
River travel
Day 11
Dakar, Senegal
Day 12
Banjul, Gambia
Days 13 - 14
River travel
Day 15
Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Day 16
Takoradi, Ghana
Day 17
Lome, Togo
Day 18
River travel
Day 19
Principe, Sao Tome and Principe
Days 20 - 22
River travel
Day 23
Walvis Bay, Namibia
Day 24
River travel
Days 25 - 26
Cape Town, South Africa
Barcelona, Spain image
Day 1
Barcelona, Spain
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
River travel image
Day 2
River travel
Cádiz, Spain image
Day 3
Cádiz, Spain

Believed to be the oldest town on the Iberian Peninsula, the Andalusian port of Cádiz enjoys a stunning location at the edge of a six-mile promontory. The town itself, with 3,000 years of history, is characterised by pretty white houses with balconies often adorned with colourful flowers. As you wander around be sure to take a stroll through the sizeable Plaza de Espãna, with its large monument dedicated to the first Spanish constitution, which was signed here in 1812. Cádiz has two pleasant seafront promenades which boast fine views of the Atlantic Ocean, and has a lovely park, the Parque Genoves, located close to the sea with an open-air theatre and attractive palm garden. Also notable is the neo-Classical cathedral, capped by a golden dome.

Casablanca, Morocco image
Day 4
Casablanca, Morocco

Many of you might will have a picture of Casablanca in your head, that has no doubt been taken from the classic Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman 1942 film – all gin joints, Moroccan souks and old stone medina alleys. But of course, time has gone by and the Casablanca of today may still have an old-world, romantic charm, but it has moved with the times and is now a thriving commercial capital, packed full of cultural attractions, contemporary galleries and top-notch restaurants just waiting to be discovered. The multifaceted port city, which fronts the Atlantic Ocean in western Morocco, combines its French colonial heritage with traditional Arab culture and European Art Deco and modernist architecture.

Agadir, Morocco image
Day 5
Agadir, Morocco
Shaped by the Atlas Mountains on one side, Agadir is framed on the other by a magnificent crescent-shaped beach. While little is known of the city’s origins, the Portuguese created a fortress here at the end of the 15th century, naming it Santa Cruz de Ghir. Freed from Portugal’s occupation by the Saadians in 1540, Agadir grew into a colourful and prosperous port and became newsworthy in 1911 when a German gunboat, the Panther, sailed into the bay as a protest against the division of North Africa between the Spanish and French. Morocco gained independence from the French in 1956, an event which was closely followed in Agadir by the tragic earthquake of 1960. The city, which has been rebuilt to represent the ‘new nation’, is blessed by fine sandy beaches overlooked by luxurious hotels and a great selection of cafés and restaurants. Please note that vendors in the souks can be very persistent and eager to make a sale.
Arrecife, Lanzarote, Spain image
Day 6
Arrecife, Lanzarote, Spain
A volcanic island designated a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, Lanzarote’s dramatic landscapes were shaped by an explosive past. Today, its pretty beaches and virtual absence of rain together with duty-free shopping make the island an extremely desirable destination. The main port and capital, Arrecife, is a pleasant town with a modern seafront and colourful gardens. Outside the capital there is plenty to explore, from the dazzling white salt flats of Janubio and the rugged terrain of Fire Mountain to the eerie caves of Los Verdes and an array of unspoilt fishing villages scattered around the coast. The island is home to a great selection of restaurants and local specialities including garbanzos compuestos – a chickpea stew; papas arrugadas – potatoes with carrots, peas, ham and green pepper; and of course, plenty of fresh seafood. Please note that those planning to participate in one of the shore excursions from this port may need to take an early lunch on board ship to suit the excursion schedules.
River travel image
Days 7 - 8
River travel
Porto Grande, Cape Verde image
Day 9
Porto Grande, Cape Verde
The crescent of volcanic islands which form the Cape Verde archipelago lie 310 miles off the Senegal coast. Despite the name (Green Cape), all the islands are barren, but they offer dramatic mountain scenery and pristine beaches. The Portuguese started colonising the islands during the 15th century and during the 16th century the archipelago became important for the supply of water and rations to boats sailing to America, Europe and Africa, and as a base for slave warehouses. The Cape Verde Islands obtained their independence from Portugal in 1975 and, although the isles may be African geographically speaking, they have retained a strong Latin flavour. Porto Grande, the port for Mindelo, is on the windward isle of São Vicente and covers an area of 88 square miles. Over 90% of the island’s inhabitants live in the capital of Mindelo, where the historic centre is characterised by old colonial houses and commemorative monuments. Please note that excursions from this port will be operated by basic minibuses: these vehicles are the best available, but lack air-conditioning, reclining seats and seat belts, and have no space for the storage of walkers or wheelchairs.
River travel image
Day 10
River travel
Dakar, Senegal image
Day 11
Dakar, Senegal
Dakar, set at the tip of the Cape Vert peninsula, is West Africa’s westernmost point and the capital of French-speaking Senegal. Although it was not founded until 1857, it is West Africa’s oldest European city and one of the most westernised. The opening of the Dakar-St Louis railway in 1885 put the town on the map; it subsequently became a French naval base and in 1904, the capital of Afrique Occidentale Française. It bears the legacy of Africa’s French colonial past, especially so in the downtown Plateau area, where the architecture is redolent of southern France. Every inch a modern city, Dakar is a frenetic buzz of activity, which can be startling. Perhaps sample the popular mint tea and try your hand at bartering in the colourful craft markets for traditional embroidery, woodcarvings, metalwork and costume jewellery.
Banjul, Gambia image
Day 12
Banjul, Gambia
The tiny city of Banjul is the capital of The Gambia, a country that itself is little more than the banks of the mighty river that shares its name. Situated on St Mary’s Island, where the River Gambia joins the Atlantic, Bathurst, as Banjul was previously called, was established by the British in the early nineteenth century as a naval outpost dedicated to putting a halt to the trade in human beings. In 1943, Franklin Roosevelt visited Banjul on his way to the Casablanca conference with Churchill, becoming the first serving American president to visit Africa. Today, Banjul plays host to a thriving tourist trade, thanks to its pleasant climate, and is the political centre for the oldest democracy in Africa.
River travel image
Days 13 - 14
River travel
Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire image
Day 15
Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Three hours south of Yamoussoukro, nestled in between the canals and waterways, lies Abidjan the economic capital of the Ivory Coast. Considered the crossroads of West Africa both economically and culturally, Abidjan benefits from clement temperatures year round, reaching average highs of around 88˚ Fahrenheit, or 30˚ Celsius. Like much of West Africa, this city has cachet and soul, and enjoys a diversity of cultures, traditions and people, notably through the French influence, but also through the steady stream of tourists that make the city both vibrant and cosmopolitan. Although its reputation was tarnished during the civil war in 2011, Abidjan held firm and has blossomed into a stunning coastal city, ripe for exploration.
Takoradi, Ghana image
Day 16
Takoradi, Ghana
Ghana's fourth-largest city plays serene beaches against a bustling commercial centre. People from around the world visit the shore, both for its beauty and to enjoy the fresh seafood served right on the sands. Frantic city life awaits a short distance inland, where an economy fuelled by Ghana’s oil industry is most apparent in the maze of vendors at Market Circle.
Lome, Togo image
Day 17
Lome, Togo
If you're sick of the usual beach resorts, then zesty Lomé will welcome you to a coastal destination that oozes with inimitable character. The former 'Jewel of West Africa' offers some wonderful beaches, and exports its delicious bounty of cocoa, coffee and pine kernels far and wide. A disorientating place, where stuttering engines and whizzing motorbikes add a chaotic essence to the city's streets, you’ll see vendors strolling with supplies balanced improbably on their heads, along with a healthy supply of intrigue, adventure and buzzing markets. Swarms of bikes and motorbikes dominate the coastal road, which borders the huge, palm tree lined Lomé beach – but the sand is wide enough for you to relax with the road merely a distant whisper. A treasure trove of traditional masks and statues wait for you to explore inside the National Museum, while the characterful Monument de l'Independance honours the country's sacrifices in its struggle for independence, and is a suitably defiant beacon of liberation.
River travel image
Day 18
River travel
Principe, Sao Tome and Principe image
Day 19
Principe, Sao Tome and Principe
Located in the Gulf of Guinea on the west coast of Africa, Principe island is twinned with Sao Tome and home to beautiful scenery and a rich culture. Enjoy the beautiful walks in Obo Natural Park, dive into the depths off the coasts of the many beaches and take a boat trip to see the whales and dolphins surrounding the islands.
River travel image
Days 20 - 22
River travel
Walvis Bay, Namibia image
Day 23
Walvis Bay, Namibia
Once a whaling station, Walvis Bay provides a gateway to the extraordinary desert landscapes of Namibia and is itself an area of unusual natural beauty. The showpiece of the Walvis Bay area is the natural lagoon where you can see flamingos in their thousands at certain times of the year, along with a variety of other wading birds such as the white pelican. Further inland you will find the stunning Namib Desert, which provides an unlikely home for a diverse array of wildlife. Alternatively, you could venture into the desert of Sossusvlei, whose mountainous ochre sand dunes are said to be the highest in the world, or visit the colonial town of Swakopmund.
River travel image
Day 24
River travel
Cape Town, South Africa image
Days 25 - 26
Cape Town, South Africa
Sometimes referred to as the Mother City, Cape Town is the most famous port in South Africa and is influenced by many different cultures, including Dutch, British and Malay. The port was founded in 1652 by Dutch explorer Jan Van Riebeeck, and evidence of Dutch colonial rule remains throughout the region. The port is located on one of the world's most important trade routes, and is mainly a container port and handler of fresh fruit. Fishing is another vital industry, with large Asian fishing fleets using Cape Town as a logistical repair base for much of the year. The region is famous for its natural beauty, with the imposing Table Mountain and Lions Head, as well as the many nature reserves and botanical gardens such as Kirstenbosch which boasts an extensive range of indigenous plant life, including proteas and ferns. Cape Town's weather is mercurial, and can change from beautiful sunshine to dramatic thunderstorms within a short period. A local adage is that in Cape Town you can experience four seasons in one day.
Ship Details
Regent Seven Seas Cruises
Seven Seas Voyager

Discover the wide variety of inviting spaces and activities on Seven Seas Voyager®. Sip fresh java at Deck 5’s Coffee Connection, run on the open-air track on Deck 12, or head to Serene Spa & Wellness™ spa on Deck 6 for some pampering.

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