20 nights onboard Insignia

Australasian Adventure

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

Leaving from: Keelung (Chilung)
Cruise ship: Insignia
Visiting: Keelung (Chilung) Kaohsiung Manila Kota Kinabalu, Sabah
Oceania Cruises Logo
Oceania Cruises

The Miami-based cruise line - a subsidiary of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings - offers seven small, luxurious ships that carry a maximum of 1,250 guests and feature the finest cuisine at sea and destination-rich itineraries that span the globe.

Expertly curated travel experiences aboard the designer-inspired, small ships call on more than 600 marquee and boutique ports in more than 100 countries on 7 continents on voyages that range from 7 to more than 200 days.

656
Passengers
400
Crew
1999
Launched
2018
Last refit
30277t
Tonnage
180m
Length
25.5m
Width
18kts
Speed
9
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Keelung (Chilung), Taiwan
Day 2
Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Day 3
River travel
Day 4
Manila, Philippines
Day 5
River travel
Day 6
Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia
Day 7
Muara, Brunei Darussalam
Days 8 - 9
River travel
Day 10
Semarang, Indonesia
Day 11
Surabaya, Indonesia
Day 12
Celukan Bawang, Bali, Indonesia
Days 13 - 14
Benoa, Bali, Indonesia
Day 15
Komodo Island, Indonesia
Day 16
River travel
Day 17
Broome, Western Australia, Australia
Days 18 - 19
River travel
Day 20
Geraldton, Western Australia, Australia
Day 21
Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia
Keelung (Chilung), Taiwan image
Day 1
Keelung (Chilung), Taiwan
With the glittering lights of Taipei - a futuristic metropolis of culture and ideas - sparkling nearby, Keelung is the first calling point for many visitors arriving in Taiwan. While this port city essentially serves as Taipei's ocean gateway, you shouldn’t be too hasty in dashing off to Taipei's neon-lit magic – first it’s well worth spending some time exploring the famous glowing night market, which hums with life each evening and is famous for its local seafood.
Kaohsiung, Taiwan image
Day 2
Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Kaohsiung is Taiwan’s second largest city, its biggest seaport, and the world’s fourth largest container port. It entered the 21st century as a newly emerging international metropolis. In the forefront of Taiwan’s expansion and modernisation efforts are the China Steel Corporation and China Shipbuilding. They are perfect examples of what Taiwan’s export-oriented economy is all about. The Love River, which has seen some recent landscaping, adds to the beauty of the city. Coffee shops along its banks offer good opportunities to view the river’s activities and enjoy a nice breeze. A 495-feet (150 metres)-long urban corridor of light, known as Urban Spotlight, was designed by local artists who wanted to make light and shadows the theme of the hall. The result is an urban space in the Central Park area teeming with artistic vision. A very important event in Taiwan’s recent history occurred here in 1979, and is known as the Kaohsiung Incident. It was the day of the first major human rights celebration on the island. Until that time, the authorities had never allowed any expression of discontent. When the day came, however, the celebration ended in chaos when police encircled the peaceful crowd and started using teargas, and pro-government instigators incited violence. Kuomintang (KMT) authorities used this as an excuse to round up all well-known opposition leaders and imprison them. Although it was hardly noticed internationally, it is recognised locally as an important turning point in the island’s transition to democracy, and it galvanised the Taiwanese people into action.
River travel image
Day 3
River travel
Manila, Philippines image
Day 4
Manila, Philippines

It might not rank quite as highly as the likes of Singapore or Hong Kong when it comes to the most popular ports of call on an Asia cruise, but Manila is an exciting and dynamic Asian metropolis that should not be overlooked. Visitors to Philippines’ capital will discover the rich history of its Spanish colonial past, still visible throughout the city, while enjoying the throng and excitement of the city’s teeming modern streets, complete with cultural centres, bars, clubs and restaurants. This is truly the city that never sleeps.

River travel image
Day 5
River travel
Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia image
Day 6
Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia
The capital of Sabah, Borneo's northernmost state, Kota Kinabalu is wedged between a tropical rainforest and the South China Sea. Many explorers use it as a launching point to venture off and see the surrounding jungle and marine life. Mt. Kinabalu challenges climbers daily, and top diving spots reel in underwater adventurers. The city is made up of a dense grid of concrete buildings built over reclaimed land along the coast. Several waterfront seafood restaurants and a diverse mix of hotels appeal to the travelers passing through, mostly off to explore the region.
Muara, Brunei Darussalam image
Day 7
Muara, Brunei Darussalam
The microscopic Sultanate of Brunei lays claim to one of the most dramatic rags-to-riches stories. Thanks to oil, the Sultan of Brunei is one of the richest men in the world, and the Sultanate is often dubbed a Shell-fare-state. Brunei's citizens do not pay income tax; they enjoy free education, medical care and old-age pensions. The government employs a third of the workforce, who are probably the best-paid bureaucrats in the world. Brunei Darussalam, as the country is officially called, is the rump of what was once a sprawling empire that occupied a land area of about twice the size of Luxembourg. On January 1, 1984, after nearly 100 years as a British Protectorate, Brunei became a fully independent sovereign nation. In August of 1967, Hassanal Bolkiah was crowned the 29th Sultan of Brunei. He succeeded his father, Sir Omar Ali Saifuddien III, who started to modernize the capital and is known as the architect of modern Brunei. Bandar Seri Begawan is the capital and the only town of any size in the country. It is a neat, modern city, split into three main areas. The "old" sector, built in the 1950s, is being redeveloped with new buildings around the Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque; the Seri Complex, a commercial area dates from the 1970s, and Gadong boasts a recently shopping center and numerous restaurants: Bandar or, simply BSB, as the capital is commonly called, still features a sprawling maze of wooden houses built on stilts along the Brunei River.
River travel image
Days 8 - 9
River travel
Semarang, Indonesia image
Day 10
Semarang, Indonesia
Semarang is one of the oldest cities in Indonesia, situated on Java's north coast between the shore of the Java Sea and a small ridge of mountains. Ceded to the Dutch West India Company in 1677 by King Amangkurat I in payment of his debts, it became their headquarters and the seat of the Dutch governor of the northeast provinces. Semarang's usefulness as a port waned due to the gradual silting up of the harbor; by the 19th century, Surabaya had eclipsed Semarang as Java's premier port. With a population of over one million, a third of whom are thought to be of Chinese extraction, Semarang is the largest city in Central Java and its administrative capital. The city consists of two parts: the coastal lowland where most of the commercial activities are found; and the hilly residential area. Although more a business center than a city for tourists, Semarang serves as a popular gateway to the mountainous interior of Central Java and to fabled Borobudur.
Surabaya, Indonesia image
Day 11
Surabaya, Indonesia
Celukan Bawang, Bali, Indonesia image
Day 12
Celukan Bawang, Bali, Indonesia
Benoa, Bali, Indonesia image
Days 13 - 14
Benoa, Bali, Indonesia
Bali really is as alluring as everyone says. This island, slightly bigger than Delaware, has it all: beaches, volcanoes, terraced rice fields, forests, renowned resorts, surfing, golf, and world-class dive sites. But what sets Bali apart from other nearby tropical destinations is Balinese tradition, and villagers dedicated to celebrating it. The hundreds of temples, dances, rituals, and crafts linked to their ancient Hindu faith aren't a show for tourists, but a living, breathing culture in which visitors are warmly received by the Balinese, who cherish their own identities.
Komodo Island, Indonesia image
Day 15
Komodo Island, Indonesia
Pink Beach earned its name for the way the beach can appear to have a rosy hue in certain lights. The color comes from small flecks of red coral mixed in with the fine white reef sand. With a few trees along the beach for shade, this stretch of coast makes a fine place to relax or enjoy a snorkel or dive in the crystal clear waters. It is possible to spot a striped clown fish nestled among the protective tentacles of its sea anemone host, or to see a grouper lazily swimming by a flamboyant soft coral. The reef here is now protected by law and the maturing corals are a joy to behold.
River travel image
Day 16
River travel
Broome, Western Australia, Australia image
Day 17
Broome, Western Australia, Australia
Traffic in the Broome Harbour (a very busy working harbour) is restricted, requiring special permits for all vehicles accessing the pier area. Guests are not permitted in this area on an individual basis. In order to make disembarkation as smooth as possible Silversea will be providing a group motorcoach transfer from the pier to the airport.  This transfer will depart shortly after the ship is cleared.  Exact timings will be communicated by the ship's staff.Guests who do not wish to go to the airport immediately following disembarkation will be transferred to Pearl Luggers, located 10 - 15 minutes from the airport, where taxis are available for hire. 
River travel image
Days 18 - 19
River travel
Geraldton, Western Australia, Australia image
Day 20
Geraldton, Western Australia, Australia
Surrounded by beaches, sun-drenched Geraldton in Western Australia is a thriving city facing the Indian Ocean. Located on the Coral Coast, the city has a friendly country town feel but is infused local history and cultural heritage. Like many coastal towns, the dining and café culture is superb and the choice of which restaurant to choose is a happy dilemma for most travellers!Celebrated for its annual display of spectacular wildflowers, Geraldton’s flora attracts visitors from all regions, with guides taking tourists on as much as 300 mile/500 kilometre round trips in order to make sure that they receive the best possible experience. A haven for visitors especially during the cooler months, the views differ year-in year-out and vary greatly depending on the rainfall. Whole fields become blanketed in colour and rare plants, such as the wreath-flower, burst into splendorous bloom. The well-informed guides keep a track of what is flowering where and visitors only have to ask to be pointed in the right direction. With over 300 species of native plants, it is only expected that insects and birds are attracted to the area. Over 120 types of bird have been classified as well as 22 types of reptile and seven types of frog. Happily, the iconic kangaroo also makes the plains their home, so visitors can expect a real Aussie welcome if they happen upon one!
Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia image
Day 21
Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia
The port city of Fremantle is a jewel in Western Australia's crown, largely because of its colonial architectural heritage and hippy vibe. Freo (as the locals call it) is a city of largely friendly, interesting, and sometimes eccentric residents supportive of busking, street art, and alfresco dining. Like all great port cities, Freo is cosmopolitan, with mariners from all parts of the world strolling the streets—including thousands of U.S. Navy personnel on rest and recreation throughout the year. It's also a good jumping-off point for a day trip to Rottnest Island, where lovely beaches, rocky coves, and unique wallaby-like inhabitants called quokkas set the scene.Modern Fremantle is a far cry from the barren, sandy plain that greeted the first wave of English settlers back in 1829 at the newly constituted Swan River Colony. Most were city dwellers, and after five months at sea in sailing ships they landed on salt-marsh flats that sorely tested their fortitude. Living in tents with packing cases for chairs, they found no edible crops, and the nearest freshwater was a distant 51 km (32 miles)—and a tortuous trip up the waters of the Swan. As a result they soon moved the settlement upriver to the vicinity of present-day Perth.Fremantle remained the principal port, and many attractive limestone buildings were built to service the port traders. Australia's 1987 defense of the America's Cup—held in waters off Fremantle—triggered a major restoration of the colonial streetscapes. In the leafy suburbs nearly every other house is a restored 19th-century gem.
Ship Details
Oceania Cruises
Insignia

Both designer-inspired and luxurious, the 656-guest Insignia offers entirely new suites, staterooms and bathrooms along with a sweepingly re-inspired atmosphere throughout the ship. The public spaces have been tastefully refreshed with a soft sea and sky palette of fabrics, designer furnishings and custom light fixtures that exquisitely showcase the inimitable style and comfort of Oceania Cruises. Insignia features four unique, open-seating restaurants, the Aquamar Spa + Vitality Centre, eight lounges and bars, a casino and 333 luxurious suites and stylish staterooms, nearly 70% of which feature private verandas.

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