14 nights onboard Queen Anne

British Isles

Queen Anne’s breathtaking interiors take inspiration from our past to define a striking new design direction for our future. Come on board to discover a ship that is modern, yet timeless. A ship that offers both exciting, novel experiences, as well as our much-loved signature venues.

Leaving from: Southampton
Cruise ship: Queen Anne
Visiting: Southampton Queensferry Kirkwall, Orkney Islands Invergordon
Cunard Line Logo
Cunard Line

The age of elegance lives on aboard Cunard's impressive fleet, with white-gloved afternoon teas, grand staircases, exuberant cabins and formal galas in elegant restaurants.

Now that Cunard has observed the centenary of its pioneering world cruise, the famous mantra of dignified excellence has intensified to create not just one of the greatest cruise experiences, but the finest travel money can buy.

2560
Passengers
1050
Crew
2024
Launched
113000t
Tonnage
323m
Length
34m
Width
24kts
Speed
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Southampton, England
Day 3
Queensferry, Scotland
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Days 3 - 3
River travel
Arrival Time: Evening; Depart Time: Evening;
Day 5
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Day 6
Invergordon, Scotland
Arrival Time: Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon
Days 7 - 8
River travel
Arrival Time: Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon;
Day 9
Greenock, Scotland
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Day 10
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Day 11
Liverpool, England
Arrival Time: Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon
Day 13
Cobh, Ireland
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Day 15
Southampton, England
Southampton, England image
Day 1
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Queensferry, Scotland image
Day 3
Queensferry, Scotland
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
River travel image
Days 3 - 3
River travel
Arrival Time: Evening; Depart Time: Evening;
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland image
Day 5
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.
Invergordon, Scotland image
Day 6
Invergordon, Scotland
The port of Invergordon is your gateway to the Great Glen, an area of Scotland that includes Loch Ness and the city of Inverness. Inverness, the capital of the Highlands, has the flavor of a Lowland town, its winds blowing in a sea-salt air from the Moray Firth. The Great Glen is also home to one of the world's most famous monster myths: in 1933, during a quiet news week, the editor of a local paper decided to run a story about a strange sighting of something splashing about in Loch Ness. But there's more to look for here besides Nessie, including inland lochs, craggy and steep-sided mountains, rugged promontories, deep inlets, brilliant purple and emerald moorland, and forests filled with astonishingly varied wildlife, including mountain hares, red deer, golden eagles, and ospreys.
River travel image
Days 7 - 8
River travel
Arrival Time: Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon;
Greenock, Scotland image
Day 9
Greenock, Scotland
Trendy stores, a booming cultural life, fascinating architecture, and stylish restaurants reinforce Glasgow's claim to being Scotland's most exciting city. After decades of decline, it has experienced an urban renaissance uniquely its own. The city’s grand architecture reflects a prosperous past built on trade and shipbuilding. Today buildings by Charles Rennie Mackintosh hold pride of place along with the Zaha Hadid–designed Riverside Museum.Glasgow (the "dear green place," as it was known) was founded some 1,500 years ago. Legend has it that the king of Strathclyde, irate about his wife's infidelity, had a ring he had given her thrown into the river Clyde. (Apparently she had passed it on to an admirer.) When the king demanded to know where the ring had gone, the distraught queen asked the advice of her confessor, St. Mungo. He suggested fishing for it—and the first salmon to emerge had the ring in its mouth. The moment is commemorated on the city's coat of arms.The medieval city expanded when it was given a royal license to trade; the current High Street was the main thoroughfare at the time. The vast profits from American cotton and tobacco built the grand mansions of the Merchant City in the 18th century. In the 19th century the river Clyde became the center of a vibrant shipbuilding industry, fed by the city’s iron and steel works. The city grew again, but its internal divisions grew at the same time. The West End harbored the elegant homes of the newly rich shipyard owners. Down by the river, areas like the infamous Gorbals, with its crowded slums, sheltered the laborers who built the ships. They came from the Highlands, expelled to make way for sheep, or from Ireland, where the potato famines drove thousands from their homes.During the 19th century the population grew from 80,000 to more than a million. And the new prosperity gave Glasgow its grand neoclassical buildings, such as those built by Alexander "Greek" Thomson, as well as the adventurous visionary buildings designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh and others who produced Glasgow’s Arts and Crafts movement. The City Chambers, built in 1888, are a proud statement in marble and gold sandstone, a clear symbol of the wealthy and powerful Victorian industrialists' hopes for the future.The decline of shipbuilding and the closure of the factories led to much speculation as to what direction the city would take now. The curious thing is that, at least in part, the past gave the city a new lease of life. It was as if people looked at their city and saw Glasgow’s beauty for the first time: its extraordinarily rich architectural heritage, its leafy parks, its artistic heritage, and its complex social history. Today Glasgow is a vibrant cultural center and a commercial hub, as well as a launching pad from which to explore the rest of Scotland, which, as it turns out, is not so far away. In fact, it takes only 40 minutes to reach Loch Lomond, where the other Scotland begins.
Belfast, Northern Ireland image
Day 10
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.
Liverpool, England image
Day 11
Liverpool, England

The home of the Three Graces, the Beatles and countless art galleries and museums to rival London, the northern maritime city is a cultural and historic destination. Once one of the world’s greatest trading hubs, Liverpool is today one of the most visited cities in the United Kingdom due to its wealth of attractions.

Cobh, Ireland image
Day 13
Cobh, Ireland

The last port of call on the Titanic’s ill-fated voyage, the seaside town on Ireland’s south coast has a historic maritime legacy. One of the major transatlantic Irish ports, Cobh (pronounced ‘Cove’ and formerly known as Queenstown) was also the departure point for 2.5 million of the six million Irish people who emigrated to North America between 1848 and 1950. While visitors flock to Cobh to learn about its fascinating maritime and emigration history, they will also find the picturesque town blessed with a beautiful cathedral and a burgeoning bar and restaurant scene.

Southampton, England image
Day 15
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Ship Details
Cunard Line
Queen Anne

Queen Anne’s breathtaking interiors take inspiration from our past to define a striking new design direction for our future. Come on board to discover a ship that is modern, yet timeless. A ship that offers both exciting, novel experiences, as well as our much-loved signature venues.

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