7 nights onboard MS Adriatic Sky

Split, Zadar and Secrets of the North Yacht Cruise - MS Adriatic Sky

Winners 2022 Best for Solo
Winners 2022 Best River Cruise Line
Sail between smaller islands and ports, allowing spectacular coastal views normally inaccessible to larger cruise liners. Enjoy this seven-night cruise on the four-star MS Adriatic Sky along the Dalmatian coast, one of the world’s most dramatic landscapes, studded with beautifully preserved and atmospheric Venetian-influenced medieval towns, on some of Europe’s clearest waters
Leaving from: Split
Cruise ship: MS Adriatic Sky
Visiting: Split Sibenik Vodice Zadar
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Riviera Travel

Riviera Travel is one of the oldest and most reliable river cruise operators in the world, with 36 years of experience running guided and escorted tours, a land and water all around the world, including river cruises.

Riviera Travel operates a unique cruising experience, partnering with local guides and experts to create a programme of guided tours and river cruises, bringing like-minded travellers together and offering a selection of authentic and bespoke travel experiences.

The operator runs river cruises on European waterways like the Danube, Rhine and Douro, but also the Nile, Mekong and Yangtze. Championing escorted tours and guided holidays, Riviera Travel line also specialises in solo travel, providing a safe, friendly and social environment for travellers going it alone.

38
Passengers
7
Crew
2021
Launched
50m
Length
4
Decks
EUR
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Split, Croatia
Day 2
Sibenik, Croatia
Day 3
Vodice, Croatia
Day 4
Zadar, Croatia
Day 5
Zlarin, Croatia
Day 6
Trogir, Croatia
Days 7 - 8
Split, Croatia
Split, Croatia image
Day 1
Split, Croatia
Split's ancient core is so spectacular and unusual that a visit is more than worth your time. The heart of the city lies within the walls of Roman emperor Diocletian's retirement palace, which was built in the 3rd century AD. Diocletian, born in the nearby Roman settlement of Salona in AD 245, achieved a brilliant career as a soldier and became emperor at the age of 40. In 295 he ordered this vast palace to be built in his native Dalmatia, and when it was completed he stepped down from the throne and retired to his beloved homeland. Upon his death, he was laid to rest in an octagonal mausoleum, around which Split's magnificent cathedral was built.In 615, when Salona was sacked by barbarian tribes, those fortunate enough to escape found refuge within the stout palace walls and divided up the vast imperial apartments into more modest living quarters. Thus, the palace developed into an urban center, and by the 11th century the settlement had expanded beyond the ancient walls.Under the rule of Venice (1420–1797), Split—as a gateway to the Balkan interior—became one of the Adriatic's main trading ports, and the city's splendid Renaissance palaces bear witness to the affluence of those times. When the Habsburgs took control during the 19th century, an overland connection to Central Europe was established by the construction of the Split–Zagreb–Vienna railway line.After World War II, the Tito years saw a period of rapid urban expansion: industrialization accelerated and the suburbs extended to accommodate high-rise apartment blocks. Today the historic center of Split is included on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites.
Sibenik, Croatia image
Day 2
Sibenik, Croatia
Šibenik's main monument, its Gothic-Renaissance cathedral, built of pale-gray Dalmatian stone and designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, stands on a raised piazza close to the seafront promenade. From here a network of narrow, cobbled streets leads through the medieval quarter of tightly packed, terra-cotta–roof houses, and up to the ruins of a 16th-century hilltop fortress. The city has never been a real tourist destination. Before the Croatian war for independence, it was a relatively prosperous industrial center, but when the factories closed, Šibenik sank into an economic depression. However, the cathedral more than warrants a look, and it makes a decent base for visiting the waterfalls of Krka National Park.
Vodice, Croatia image
Day 3
Vodice, Croatia
Zadar, Croatia image
Day 4
Zadar, Croatia
Dalmatia's capital for more than 1,000 years, Zadar is all too often passed over by travelers on their way to Split or Dubrovnik. What they miss out on is a city of more than 73,000 that is remarkably lovely and lively despite—and, in some measure, because of—its tumultuous history. The Old Town, separated from the rest of the city on a peninsula some 4 km (2½ miles) long and just 1,640 feet wide, is bustling and beautiful: the marble pedestrian streets are replete with Roman ruins, medieval churches, palaces, museums, archives, and libraries. Parts of the new town are comparatively dreary, a testament to what a world war followed by decades of communism, not to mention a civil war, can do to the architecture of a city that is 3,000 years old. A settlement had already existed on the site of the present-day city for some 2,000 years when Rome finally conquered Zadar in the 1st century BC; the foundations of the forum can be seen today. Before the Romans came the Liburnians had made it a key center for trade with the Greeks and Romans for 800 years. In the 3rd century BC the Romans began to seriously pester the Liburnians, but required two centuries to bring the area under their control. During the Byzantine era, Zadar became the capital of Dalmatia, and this period saw the construction of its most famous church, the 9th-century St. Donat's Basilica. It remained the region's foremost city through the ensuing centuries. The city then experienced successive onslaughts and occupations—both long and short—by the Osogoths, the Croatian-Hungarian kings, the Venetians, the Turks, the Habsburgs, the French, the Habsburgs again, and finally the Italians before becoming part of Yugoslavia and, in 1991, the independent republic of Croatia. Zadar was for centuries an Italian-speaking city, and Italian is still spoken widely, especially by older people. Indeed, it was ceded to Italy in 1921 under the Treaty of Rapallo (and reverted to its Italian name of Zara). Its occupation by the Germans from 1943 led to intense bombing by the Allies during World War II, which left most of the city in ruins. Zadar became part of Tito's Yugoslavia in 1947, prompting many Italian residents to leave. Zadar's most recent ravages occurred during a three-month siege by Serb forces and months more of bombardment during the Croatian-Serbian war between 1991 and 1995. But you'd be hard-pressed to find outward signs of this today in what is a city to behold. There are helpful interpretive signs in English all around the Old Town, so you certainly won't feel lost when trying to make sense of the wide variety of architectural sites you might otherwise pass by with only a cursory look.
Zlarin, Croatia image
Day 5
Zlarin, Croatia
Trogir, Croatia image
Day 6
Trogir, Croatia
Split, Croatia image
Days 7 - 8
Split, Croatia
Split's ancient core is so spectacular and unusual that a visit is more than worth your time. The heart of the city lies within the walls of Roman emperor Diocletian's retirement palace, which was built in the 3rd century AD. Diocletian, born in the nearby Roman settlement of Salona in AD 245, achieved a brilliant career as a soldier and became emperor at the age of 40. In 295 he ordered this vast palace to be built in his native Dalmatia, and when it was completed he stepped down from the throne and retired to his beloved homeland. Upon his death, he was laid to rest in an octagonal mausoleum, around which Split's magnificent cathedral was built.In 615, when Salona was sacked by barbarian tribes, those fortunate enough to escape found refuge within the stout palace walls and divided up the vast imperial apartments into more modest living quarters. Thus, the palace developed into an urban center, and by the 11th century the settlement had expanded beyond the ancient walls.Under the rule of Venice (1420–1797), Split—as a gateway to the Balkan interior—became one of the Adriatic's main trading ports, and the city's splendid Renaissance palaces bear witness to the affluence of those times. When the Habsburgs took control during the 19th century, an overland connection to Central Europe was established by the construction of the Split–Zagreb–Vienna railway line.After World War II, the Tito years saw a period of rapid urban expansion: industrialization accelerated and the suburbs extended to accommodate high-rise apartment blocks. Today the historic center of Split is included on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites.
Ship Details
Riviera Travel
MS Adriatic Sky

We are delighted to celebrate a brand new addition to our fabulous fleet of luxury yacht cruisers for 2021, the MV Adriatic Sky. This elegant vessel is equipped with the latest safety features and boasts a sleek and sophisticated design across all of its impressive 50 metres, guaranteed to make quite an impression as you arrive at the quaint ports along this truly awe-inspiring coastline.

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