10 nights onboard Seabourn Venture

10-Day Andalusian Nights: Spotlight On Seville

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Seabourn's ultra-luxury purpose-built expedition ship Seabourn Venture, paying tribute to the remote destinations visited by the brand's highly successful expedition and Ventures by Seabourn excursion programs and the fascinating places yet to be explored in the future.

Leaving from: Barcelona
Cruise ship: Seabourn Venture
Visiting: Barcelona Sète Palamós Mahón, Menorca
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Seabourn

For decadent luxury that sails hand-in-hand with personalised experience and in-depth access to world heritage, may we introduce Seabourn Cruises.

Blending nimble power and grace with beautifully designed spaces, Seabourn ships can be likened to lavish resorts. Except, uniquely, the staff already know you just as they also remember your favourite drink.

264
Passengers
120
Crew
2021
Launched
23000t
Tonnage
170m
Length
26m
Width
19kts
Speed
8
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Barcelona, Spain
Day 2
Sète, France
Day 3
Palamós, Spain
Day 4
Mahón, Menorca, Spain
Day 6
Motril, Spain
Day 7
Tangier, Morocco
Days 8 - 9
Seville, Spain
Day 10
Portimão, Portugal
Day 11
Lisbon, Portugal
Barcelona, Spain image
Day 1
Barcelona, Spain
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.
Sète, France image
Day 2
Sète, France
The fishing village of Sète serves as gateway to Montpellier, in the North. Other noteworthy destinations in this area include Carcassone, Aigues Mortes, the Abbaye de Fontfroide, and Pezenas. For a look at the real fisherman's life, however, stay right where you are. Sète is the Mediterranean's biggest fishing port. Canals winding through town make it fun to stroll around, and there are a number of good walking paths leading to the beach (about 30 minutes to the west). Although it's small and unspectacular, Plage de la Corniche has calm, pristine waters that are perfect for swimming. For a panoramic view of the area, climb Mont St-Clair or Les Pierres Blanches and pick a beach to settle down on.
Palamós, Spain image
Day 3
Palamós, Spain
One of the best ways to arrive in Catalonia is by sea, especially via the Costa Brava. This coastline, also known as the Rugged or Wild Coast, stretches from Blanes to the French border. Its name aptly refers to the steep cliff of ancient twisted rocks, which runs its entire length and is bounded inland by the Catalan mountain ranges. The intensity of the coast’s colour, the ruggedness of the rocks and the scent of the plants all combine to add to its attraction. The history of this region is long and varied. Traces can be found of the advanced culture of the Iberians, Greeks, Romans, Visigoths and Arabs. With Wilfred I and the independence of Catalan countries, the Catalan dynasty was born. Later, in 1479, Catalonia became a part of unified Spain following the marriage of Isabel, Queen of Castile, and Fernando, King of Aragon. The port of Palamos, some 36 miles northeast of Barcelona, has been in existence for nearly 700 years thanks to its location on one of the deepest natural bays in the western Mediterranean. The town itself is the southernmost of a series of resorts popular with sun worshippers. For the most part, Palamos has managed to retain some of the charm of a fishing village. The port also serves as a gateway to such inland locations as Girona, the capital of the province. Art lovers may want to visit Figueras, famous for its bizarre Teatre-Museu Dali, the foremost of a series of sites associated with the eccentric surrealist artist, Salvador Dali. If you choose to stay in Palamos, you can enjoy the pleasant atmosphere of the town or spend some time at a nearby beach. The town has a long seagoing tradition and busy harbour. The fish auction, prompted by the arrival of the fishing boats, is a spectacle worth seeing. The Fishing Museum illustrates the history and the life of the families who live off the sea.
Mahón, Menorca, Spain image
Day 4
Mahón, Menorca, Spain
The capital of Menorca since 1721, Mahon has a impressive natural deep water harbour, which is one of the largest in the world. This, coupled with its strategic location, has made it a stronghold for many nations throughout history. Mahon has an abundance of historical buildings, the oldest being the Arch of Saint Roc which is all that remains of the wall that once encircled the whole town. The island was occupied by the British during the 18th century and Lord Nelson is thought to have stayed there. Indeed, San Antoni Mansion, located on the north side of the harbour, houses a collection of Nelson memorabilia. The legacy of colonial rule can be seen in the muted Georgian style of some of the buildings, but Mahon still boasts attractive examples of neo-Classical, Baroque and Romanesque architecture. With narrow streets to explore, pleasant shaded squares and welcoming pavement cafés, there is something for everyone to enjoy. Please be aware that most shops in town close for a siesta between 1330 and 1730.
Motril, Spain image
Day 6
Motril, Spain
Motril is located in the Spanish region of Andalucia on the Costa Tropical. It is the biggest town on the Costa with a thriving commercial, fishing and leisure port. An hour and a half's drive east of Malaga and within easy reach of the magnificent Sierra Nevada mountain range, Motril makes an ideal base for exploring the many delights of the Andalucian coastline and its hinterland. Halfway between the resorts of Malaga to the west and Almeria to the east, nestling in the foothills of the Sierra Lujar mountains, Motril is at the heart of one of the most fertile and productive agricultural areas of Spain. The Costa Tropical takes its name from its sub-tropical climate which enables the cultivation of exotic fruits and crops such as sugar cane, oranges, lemons, apples, avocadoes, mangoes and bananas. One of the sights of Motril is the 17th-century church of Nuestra Señora de la Cabeza, dedicated to the town's patron saint.
Tangier, Morocco image
Day 7
Tangier, Morocco
James Bond's explosive Tanjawi antics may evoke excitement, but a visit to Tangier promises a more tranquil adventure. This Moroccan city's history is steeped in intrigue, with its strategic location attracting Phoenicians, Romans, and Arabs over the centuries. Tangier's allure as a cinematic backdrop has captured the imagination of filmmakers, showcasing its labyrinthine streets and stunning vistas. From the bustling Grand Socco square to the iconic Kasbah, Tangier's blend of cultures and influences offers a captivating journey through time. Embodying the spirit of adventure, Tangier invites travelers to explore its storied past and vibrant present with curiosity and wonder.
Seville, Spain image
Days 8 - 9
Seville, Spain

The birthplace of flamenco, Spain’s vibrant southern capital is a seductive and soul-stirring city. Along with dancing, Seville is also famous for its extraordinary Mudejar, Gothic and Renaissance architecture, sensational food, wonderful tapas bars and charming old neighbourhoods. With a wealth of cultural and historic attractions from which to choose, cruise passengers will be quite spoilt for choice on their stopover in the Andalusian capital.

Portimão, Portugal image
Day 10
Portimão, Portugal
Portimão is a major fishing port, and significant investment has been poured into transforming it into an attractive cruise port as well. The city itself is spacious and has several good shopping streets—though sadly many of the more traditional retailers have closed in the wake of the global economic crisis. There is also a lovely riverside area that just begs to be strolled (lots of the coastal cruises depart from here). Don’t leave without stopping for an alfresco lunch at the Doca da Sardinha ("sardine dock") between the old bridge and the railway bridge. You can sit at one of many inexpensive establishments, eating charcoal-grilled sardines (a local specialty) accompanied by chewy fresh bread, simple salads, and local wine.
Lisbon, Portugal image
Day 11
Lisbon, Portugal

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Ship Details
Seabourn
Seabourn Venture

Seabourn's ultra-luxury purpose-built expedition ship Seabourn Venture, paying tribute to the remote destinations visited by the brand's highly successful expedition and Ventures by Seabourn excursion programs and the fascinating places yet to be explored in the future.

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