33 nights onboard Island Princess

29-Day World Cruise Segment - Holy Land, Turkey & Aegean Sea

Winners 2022 Best Ocean Cruise Line
Winners 2022 Favourite Luxury or Premium Cruise Line

A floating retreat, bound for exciting destinations

Island Princess is your own private retreat on the sea.

Leaving from: Cape Town
Cruise ship: Island Princess
Visiting: Cape Town Cape Town Walvis Bay Mindelo, São Vicente Island
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Princess Cruises

Credited with introducing millions of Americans to the concept of a modern cruise holiday, Princess Cruises is still innovating to this day.

Sporting a fleet of 17 ships with capacities ranging from 2,000 to 4,300 passengers, the line is best known for its Alaskan cruises, but travels to destinations the world over.

With an emphasis on destination leadership and local expertise, Princess is an excellent choice for the discerning traveller seeking to sail in comfort.

2200
Passengers
900
Crew
2003
Launched
2017
Last refit
91627t
Tonnage
294.1m
Length
37.2m
Width
22kts
Speed
16
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Days 1 - 2
Cape Town, South Africa
Day 4
Walvis Bay, Namibia
Day 12
Mindelo, São Vicente Island, Cape Verde
Day 15
Funchal, Madeira, Portugal
Day 17
Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Day 20
Siracuse, Sicily, Italy
Day 22
Athens, Greece
Day 23
Volos, Greece
Day 24
Pátmos, Greece
Wheelchair Access Limited
Day 25
Kusadasi, Turkey
Day 26
Rhodes, Greece
Day 27
Khania, Greece
Day 29
Dubrovnik, Croatia
Day 30
Bar, Montenegro
Day 31
Taranto, Italy
Day 32
Valletta, Malta
Day 34
Civitavecchia, Italy
Cape Town, South Africa image
Days 1 - 2
Cape Town, South Africa
Absorb Cape Town's vibrant culture with a visit to the iconic Victoria & Alfred Waterfront, where local artisans showcase their craft in a bustling market atmosphere. Explore the city's rich history or wander through the colourful Bo-Kaap neighbourhood, known for its distinctive architecture and Cape Malay heritage. With its stunning landscapes, diverse cuisine, and welcoming locals, Cape Town promises an unforgettable experience that will leave you enchanted and inspired, making it a must-visit destination on any cruise itinerary. You'll be walking through real-time heritage, rather than reading about events in a book.
Walvis Bay, Namibia image
Day 4
Walvis Bay, Namibia
Once a whaling station, Walvis Bay provides a gateway to the extraordinary desert landscapes of Namibia and is itself an area of unusual natural beauty. The showpiece of the Walvis Bay area is the natural lagoon where you can see flamingos in their thousands at certain times of the year, along with a variety of other wading birds such as the white pelican. Further inland you will find the stunning Namib Desert, which provides an unlikely home for a diverse array of wildlife. Alternatively, you could venture into the desert of Sossusvlei, whose mountainous ochre sand dunes are said to be the highest in the world, or visit the colonial town of Swakopmund.
Mindelo, São Vicente Island, Cape Verde image
Day 12
Mindelo, São Vicente Island, Cape Verde
Your next stop will be Cape Verde’s cultural capital, Mindelo. Get along with the locals listening to the real morna in the bars of the old town and sipping the local drink, a sugarcane spirit. This island is also known by its British and Portuguese colonial architecture and pastel-coloured houses, the municipal market and the facades of the old Governor’s Palace.
Funchal, Madeira, Portugal image
Day 15
Funchal, Madeira, Portugal
Gibraltar, Gibraltar image
Day 17
Gibraltar, Gibraltar

Tagged on to the end of Iberia, the intriguing British outpost of Gibraltar is dominated by a sandy peninsula and the stunning 1,400-feet-high limestone Rock. Although small, Gibraltar has always been seen as having great strategic importance on account of its advantageous position where the Atlantic meets the Mediterranean, just 12 miles from the coast of Africa. Ever popular with British holidaymakers, Gibraltar is very much a home from home, boasting excellent duty-free shopping in many familiar British high street shops. Please note: Gibraltar’s small size and narrow winding roads mean that excursions are operated by 22-seater mini-buses, accompanied by a driver/guide. Local health and safety regulations prohibit the carriage of walking aids and collapsible wheelchairs on these vehicles. If you do wish to bring a mobility aid, we can arrange the Rock Tour by taxi, which has extra space. If this suits your requirements, please advise the Tours and Travel office when you join the ship, as numbers are limited.

Siracuse, Sicily, Italy image
Day 20
Siracuse, Sicily, Italy
Welcome to Siracusa, where ancient myths and legends intertwine with the present. Set along the sparkling shores of the Ionian Sea, Siracusa basks in a Mediterranean climate, inviting cruisegoers to immerse themselves in its timeless charm. Away from the typical tourist traps, this coastal gem offers an authentic experience that showcases the true essence of Italy. Cruise lines often dock here to provide travelers with a glimpse into the country's soul, from exploring the ancient Greek ruins of Neapolis to strolling through the enchanting streets of Ortygia. As a testament to its rich history, Siracusa boasts one of the largest Greek theaters in the world, where performances still captivate audiences to this day.
Athens, Greece image
Day 22
Athens, Greece
Athens, the cradle of democracy, where philosophers like Plato and Aristotle shaped the foundations of Western thought, offers more than just a stroll through ancient ruins. With a climate that boasts mild winters and warm, sunny summers, it's ideal for year-round exploration. The city offers an authentic glimpse into the Greek way of life, away from the typical tourist traps, with bustling local markets and traditional cafes hidden in plain sight among the city's modern hustle. Cruise lines such as Norwegian and Royal Caribbean offer tailored excursions to iconic spots like the Acropolis, yet it's the lesser-known Philopappos Hill that provides breathtaking views of the entire cityscape, including a direct line of sight to the Parthenon, adding a unique layer to the visitor experience.
Volos, Greece image
Day 23
Volos, Greece
Pátmos, Greece image
Day 24
Pátmos, Greece
For better or worse, it can be difficult to reach Patmos—for many travelers, this lack of access is definitely for the better, since the island retains the air of an unspoiled retreat. Rocky and barren, the small, 34-square-km (21-square-mi) island lies beyond the islands of Kalymnos and Leros, northwest of Kos. Here on a hillside is the Monastery of the Apocalypse, which enshrines the cave where St. John received the Revelation in AD 95. Scattered evidence of Mycenaean presence remains on Patmos, and walls of the classical period indicate the existence of a town near Skala. Most of the island's approximately 2,800 people live in three villages: Skala, medieval Chora, and the small rural settlement of Kambos. The island is popular among the faithful making pilgrimages to the monastery as well as with vacationing Athenians and a newly growing community of international trendsetters—designers, artists, poets, and “taste gurus” (to quote Vogue’s July 2011 write-up of the island)—who have bought homes in Chora. These stylemeisters followed in the footsteps of Alexandrian John Stefanidis and the English artist Teddy Millington-Drake who, in the early ’60s, set about creating what eventually became hailed as one of the most gorgeous island homes in the world. The word soon spread thanks to their many guests (who included Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis) but, happily, administrators have carefully contained development, and as a result, Patmos retains its charm and natural beauty—even in the busy month of August.
Kusadasi, Turkey image
Day 25
Kusadasi, Turkey
Welcome to Kusadasi, where the sands of time reveal tales of ancient civilizations and maritime adventures. Here, amidst the gentle Mediterranean climate and azure waters, cruise lines dock to unveil the treasures of this historic port city. Kusadasi offers an authentic escape from the typical tourist traps, with its winding streets, bustling markets, and welcoming locals. As a showcase for the real Turkey, Kusadasi boasts a rich culinary scene, where traditional Turkish delights tantalize the taste buds. And did you know? Kusadasi is home to the ancient city of Ephesus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, attracting travelers from far and wide to marvel at its majestic ruins.
Rhodes, Greece image
Day 26
Rhodes, Greece

The largest island of the Dodecanese and the fourth-largest Greek island, Rhodes has become a hugely popular summer holiday destination, with visitors drawn to the island for its historic charm, wonderful beaches and sensational Greek food. The bustling Unesco-listed old town, filled with a plethora of restaurants, shops, bars and historic sites, attracts thousands of tourists each year, as does Faliraki, the seaside resort famed for its lively nightlife. Alternatively, history lovers tend to flock to the Cyclades-style village of Lindos, home to the majestic Acropolis and the 14th-century Castle of the Knights of St John.

Khania, Greece image
Day 27
Khania, Greece
The second-largest city in Crete and capital of the Homonym Prefecture, Chania is located in Minoan Kidonia at the end of the Homonym Gulf between the Akrotiri and Onicha peninsulas. Chania City is divided into two parts; the Old Town, which is comprised of several connected districts built around the old Venetian Harbour, and New Town, a larger, more modern city whose centre is situated next to, and south of, the Old Town. The Old Town is home to Venetian buildings and Turkish elements that combine to create a unique architectural style, and is considered to be the most beautiful urban district on Crete. It was once surrounded by old Venetian fortifications that separated it from the New Town; however, only the eastern and western parts remain today. Due to its compact size, Skiathos can be easily explored in just a single day.
Dubrovnik, Croatia image
Day 29
Dubrovnik, Croatia

Nothing can prepare you for your first sight of Dubrovnik. Lying 216 km (135 miles) southeast of Split and commanding a jaw-dropping coastal location, it is one of the world's most beautiful fortified cities. Its massive stone ramparts and fortress towers curve around a tiny harbor, enclosing graduated ridges of sun-bleached orange-tiled roofs, copper domes, and elegant bell towers. Your imagination will run wild picturing what it looked like seven centuries ago when the walls were built, without any suburbs or highways around it, just this magnificent stone city rising out of the sea.In the 7th century AD, residents of the Roman city Epidaurum (now Cavtat) fled the Avars and Slavs of the north and founded a new settlement on a small rocky island, which they named Laus, and later Ragusa. On the mainland hillside opposite the island, the Slav settlement called Dubrovnik grew up. In the 12th century the narrow channel separating the two settlements was filled in (now the main street through the Old Town, called Stradun), and Ragusa and Dubrovnik became one. The city was surrounded by defensive walls during the 13th century, and these were reinforced with towers and bastions in the late 15th century.From 1358 to 1808 the city thrived as a powerful and remarkably sophisticated independent republic, reaching its golden age during the 16th century. In 1667 many of its splendid Gothic and Renaissance buildings were destroyed by an earthquake. The defensive walls survived the disaster, and the city was rebuilt in baroque style.Dubrovnik lost its independence to Napoléon in 1808, and in 1815 passed to Austria-Hungary. During the 20th century, as part of Yugoslavia, the city became a popular tourist destination, and in 1979 it was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. During the war for independence, it came under heavy siege. Thanks to careful restoration, few traces of damage remain; however, there are maps inside the Pile and Ploče Gates illustrating the points around the city where damage was done. It’s only when you experience Dubrovnik yourself that you can understand what a treasure the world nearly lost

Bar, Montenegro image
Day 30
Bar, Montenegro
Taranto, Italy image
Day 31
Taranto, Italy
Valletta, Malta image
Day 32
Valletta, Malta

Malta: the country that God built. Well, kind of. Malta is well-known for being the once-stronghold of the famous religious military order, The Knights Hospitaller, who were granted the land in 1530 from the King of Spain in exchange for an annual fee of one Maltese falcon (which eventually inspired the name of Dashiell Hammett’s famous novel). And these marauding knights certainly did a great job putting the place together. Valletta, the nation’s capital, remains the highlight and exploring this fascinating walled city (which kept the Hospitallers secure until they came across Napoleon in 1798) is akin to walking back in time. It’s small size (just 0.3 square miles) makes it the perfect cruise stopover and is the ideal base for exploring the rest of the country on excursions.

Civitavecchia, Italy image
Day 34
Civitavecchia, Italy

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here.

Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Ship Details
Princess Cruises
Island Princess

A floating retreat, bound for exciting destinations

Island Princess is your own private retreat on the sea.

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