40 nights onboard Seabourn Pursuit

40-Day Andesite Line & The Eastern Pacific

Winners 2022 Grand Prix Award
Winners 2022 Best Specialist Cruise Line
Winners 2022 Best for Wellbeing Spas
Winners 2022 Best for Accommodation

Construction for Seabourn Pursuit began in fall 2020 during a ceremony in San Giorgo di Nogare, Italy, and the build process is well underway. The ship is scheduled for delivery in 2023, with its sister ship, Seabourn Venture, slated for delivery in 2022.

Leaving from: Guam
Cruise ship: Seabourn Pursuit
Visiting: Guam Chuuk (ex Truk) Oroluk Atoll Pohnpei (ex Ponape)
Seabourn Logo
Seabourn

For decadent luxury that sails hand-in-hand with personalised experience and in-depth access to world heritage, may we introduce Seabourn Cruises.

Blending nimble power and grace with beautifully designed spaces, Seabourn ships can be likened to lavish resorts. Except, uniquely, the staff already know you just as they also remember your favourite drink.

264
Passengers
120
Crew
2023
Launched
23000t
Tonnage
170m
Length
26m
Width
19kts
Speed
8
Decks
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Guam, Guam
Day 4
Chuuk (ex Truk), Micronesia
Day 5
Oroluk Atoll, Micronesia
Day 6
Pohnpei (ex Ponape), Micronesia
Day 9
Bakawari Island, Papua New Guinea
Day 10
Honiara, Guadalcanal Island, Solomon Islands
Day 12
Luganville, Vanuatu
Day 15
Kadavu Island, Fiji
Day 16
Fulaga Island, Fiji
Day 21
Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia
Day 22
Anaa, French Polynesia
Day 23
Fakarava, French Polynesia
Day 27
Pitcairn Island, Pitcairn
Day 28
Henderson Island, Pitcairn
Day 29
Ducie Island, Pitcairn
Days 32 - 33
Hangaroa, Easter Island, Chile
Day 38
Alejandro Selkirk Island, Chile
Day 39
San Juan Bautista (Robinson Crusoe Island), Chile
Day 41
San Antonio, Chile
Guam, Guam image
Day 1
Guam, Guam
Situated in the western Pacific Ocean lies Guam, the largest and southernmost island in the Mariana Islands archipelago. There is a wealth of history in Guam, it was ceded to the US by Spain in 1898 after the Spanish-American War. Captured by Japan in 1941, it was retaken by the US 3 years later. Come to the end of your expedition in Guam where you can enjoy local culture and visit the historic landmarks.
Chuuk (ex Truk), Micronesia image
Day 4
Chuuk (ex Truk), Micronesia
Chuuk Lagoon, also previously known as Truk Lagoon is one of the four states of the Federated States of Micronesia. The cluster of 16 much-eroded volcanic islands have mangrove swamps along their coasts with rich rainforests in the central mountainous areas. The islands are hugely popular with scuba divers thanks to the incredibly interesting shipwrecks which have become foundations for new reef growth.
Oroluk Atoll, Micronesia image
Day 5
Oroluk Atoll, Micronesia
Pohnpei (ex Ponape), Micronesia image
Day 6
Pohnpei (ex Ponape), Micronesia
Bakawari Island, Papua New Guinea image
Day 9
Bakawari Island, Papua New Guinea
Honiara, Guadalcanal Island, Solomon Islands image
Day 10
Honiara, Guadalcanal Island, Solomon Islands
Honiara is the capital city of the Solomon Islands on the north-western coast of Guadalcanal Island. It is the hub of all activity in the archipelago which has recently undergone an ‘urban boom’. Discover the cities beautiful landscapes and the significance of the city in the World War II.
Luganville, Vanuatu image
Day 12
Luganville, Vanuatu
Kadavu Island, Fiji image
Day 15
Kadavu Island, Fiji
Fulaga Island, Fiji image
Day 16
Fulaga Island, Fiji
Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia image
Day 21
Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia
Papeete will be your gateway to the tropical paradise of French Polynesia, where islands fringed with gorgeous beaches and turquoise ocean await to soothe the soul. This spirited city is the capital of French Polynesia, and serves as a superb base for onward exploration of Tahiti – an island of breathtaking landscapes and oceanic vistas. Wonderful lagoons of crisp, clear water beg to be snorkelled, stunning black beaches and blowholes pay tribute to the island's volcanic heritage, and lush green mountains beckon you inland on adventures, as you explore extraordinary Tahiti. Visit to relax inside picturesque stilted huts, which stand out over shimmering water, as you settle into the intoxicating rhythm of life, in this Polynesian paradise.
Anaa, French Polynesia image
Day 22
Anaa, French Polynesia
Fakarava, French Polynesia image
Day 23
Fakarava, French Polynesia
Pitcairn Island, Pitcairn image
Day 27
Pitcairn Island, Pitcairn
With a total of 56 residents on the island, Adamstown is the capital of the Pitcairn Islands and the only populated settlement, as all of the other Pitcairn Islands are uninhabited (although were populated by Polynesians in the 11th through 15th centuries). Halfway between Peru and New Zealand, Pitcairn was the perfect hiding spot for the famed HMS Bounty mutineers and their Tahitian wives. Not only had the island been misplaced on early maps of the region, but it can also be very difficult to come ashore as large breakers tend to build up just in front of the small harbour of Bounty Bay. On shore visit the local museum that houses the HMS Bounty Bible, the historic Adamstown Church, view Fletcher Christian’s cave, or keep an eye out for the Pitcairn Reed Warbler.
Henderson Island, Pitcairn image
Day 28
Henderson Island, Pitcairn
On this remote and uninhabited piece of land – a raised coral island virtually untouched by man – you will get a true sense of how the landscape has appeared for endless years, while gaining an understanding of how natural selection has resulted in Henderson’s primary attraction: four endemic land birds. To protect the rare, natural state of Henderson Island, UNESCO designated it as a World Heritage Site in 1988.
Ducie Island, Pitcairn image
Day 29
Ducie Island, Pitcairn
Discovered in 1606 by a Portuguese explorer, Ducie is a small isolated atoll and is the easternmost of the Pitcairn Islands. The island’s most prominent bit of history is the 1881 wreckage of the mail ship Acadia, which ran aground on the island when the lookout mistook the island for a cloud due to its white beaches. Ducie is a mere speck in the surrounding expanse of ocean, uninhabited except for the estimated 500,000 nesting seabirds that reside among the two plant species (Beach Heliotrope and at least one specimen of Pemphis) that grow over seventy percent of the island. Bird species that visitors may be able to see include Murphy's Petrels, White Terns, Great Frigate birds and Masked Boobies. Snorkelers love to visit the top of the wreck of the Acadia or in the atoll’s lagoon waters.
Hangaroa, Easter Island, Chile image
Days 32 - 33
Hangaroa, Easter Island, Chile
Discovered (by the Western world) on Easter Sunday, 1722, Easter Island is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the most isolated places on the face of the Earth, some 2,300 miles from the Chilean mainland. Although more Polynesian than South American in character, the 64-square mile island was annexed by Chile in 1888, and is now famous as the world’s largest ‘open air museum’ on account of the Moai, or human-like stone statues, that can be found on the island. The Moai remain very much a mystery, which archaeologists are still trying to unlock by interpreting an ancient language of the Rapa Nui, which is the key to understanding this culture, and is written on the so called ‘rongo rongo tablets’. The island owes its origin to three volcanoes which erupted some three million years ago: Poike, Rano Kau and Maunga Terevaka. It is not known when or how the island was first populated, but the most credible theory suggests that the Rapa Nui people came from other Pacific islands in the 4th century AD. In addition to the cultural and archaeological interest, there are the beautiful beaches, transparent waters, and coral reefs that might be expected of a Pacific Island.
Alejandro Selkirk Island, Chile image
Day 38
Alejandro Selkirk Island, Chile
Alejandro Selkirk Island is part of the Juan Fernandez archipelago. The island itself was renamed in 1966 after the marooned sailor who served as the template for Daniel Defoe’s novel Robinson Crusoe, although Alejandro Selkirk was a castaway on a different island, named Robinson Crusoe Island. Alejandro Selkirk is located 165 kilometres west of the other islands in the archipelago. Throughout much of its history, the island has been uninhabited, although there is a former penal settlement on the middle of the east coast, which operated from 1909 to 1930. During the summer months, Selkirk welcomes a community of lobster fishermen and their families who come from Robinson Crusoe. As part of the Chilean National Park, it also holds the UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve title. The island is home to a number of rare and endangered plant and animal species. One of those iconic species—the Masafuera Rayadito—is found only on Selkirk; its global population numbers in the low hundreds and it is of particular interest to researchers and those looking to prevent species extinctions.
San Juan Bautista (Robinson Crusoe Island), Chile image
Day 39
San Juan Bautista (Robinson Crusoe Island), Chile
Robinson Crusoe Island is located 600 kilometres off the coast of Chile. The island is a rugged volcanic speck where 70 percent of its plant species are endemic, and is the largest of the Juan Fernandez Islands, a small archipelago that since 1935 is a Chilean National Park which was declared a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. This island has witnessed and played an important role in Chilean and world history. In 1750 the village of San Juan Bautista was founded at Cumberland Bay and by 1779 there were already 7 fortresses bristling with guns. The island’s isolation offered Spain a splendid place for setting up a penal colony, to which high-ranking Chilean patriots were deported in the early 19th century. In 1915, during the First World War, three British ships and a German one, the Dresden, engaged in a sea battle which ended with the scuttling of the German cruiser. Today there are currently around one thousand people living in the archipelago, most of them in the village of San Juan Bautista engaged in fishing for the “pincer-less lobster”, a delicacy in the mainland.
San Antonio, Chile image
Day 41
San Antonio, Chile
San Antonio greets you with its serene landscapes, from the sun-kissed River Walk to the historic Alamo, setting the stage for a genuine local experience. The warm, inviting climate year-round enhances the area's unique charm, perfect for those looking to immerse themselves in the true essence of Texan life. Here, tradition thrives in the bustling markets and lively festivals, offering a vivid display of authentic Texan customs and a departure from typical tourist destinations. A unique fact about San Antonio is that it hosts the largest mariachi festival in the world every year, a true spectacle of local sound and color.
Ship Details
Seabourn
Seabourn Pursuit

Construction for Seabourn Pursuit began in fall 2020 during a ceremony in San Giorgo di Nogare, Italy, and the build process is well underway. The ship is scheduled for delivery in 2023, with its sister ship, Seabourn Venture, slated for delivery in 2022.

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