10 nights onboard Seven Seas Mariner

A Caribbean Holiday

Winners 2022 Best Luxury Ocean Cruise Line

If you wish to sail amidst the stunning glaciers of Alaska in comfort and style, you’ll find your ideal voyage in the summer itineraries of Seven Seas Mariner®. In other seasons, the ship explores the wonders of Asia, Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.

Leaving from: Miami, Florida
Cruise ship: Seven Seas Mariner
Visiting: Miami, Florida Puerto Plata San Juan (Puerto Rico) Gustavia
Regent Seven Seas Cruises Logo
Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Regent is almost in a class of its own, offering luxury on an incredible scale with original Picassos, an acre of marble and 500 chandeliers aboard Seven Seas Explorer, Seven Seas Splendor and Seven Seas Grandeur.

The most opulent suites in all three - at around £8,000 a night - feature grand pianos, private bars and even their own spas. The signature Compass Rose restaurant is an absolute must-see.

684
Passengers
467
Crew
2001
Launched
2018
Last refit
48075t
Tonnage
216m
Length
28m
Width
20kts
Speed
8
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Day 2
River travel
Day 3
Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic
Day 4
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico
Day 5
Gustavia, Saint Barthélemy
Day 6
Roseau, Dominica
Day 7
Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda
Days 8 - 9
River travel
Day 10
Nassau, Bahamas
Day 11
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
River travel image
Day 2
River travel
Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic image
Day 3
Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic
San Felipe de Puerto Plata is the capital of the Puerto Plata province on the Dominican Republic’s Atlantic north coast. The city is best known for its beaches. Playa Dorada’s lengthy beachfront is backed by resorts and an 18-hole golf course. The city’s old colonial-era center is dominated by the 16th-century Fortaleza San Felipe, a Spanish fortress that now houses historical and military artifacts.
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico image
Day 4
San Juan (Puerto Rico), Puerto Rico
If you associate Puerto Rico's capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island's nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de León had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location. In 1521, after he became the first colonial governor, Ponce de León switched the name of the island—which was then called San Juan Bautista in honor of St. John the Baptist—with that of the settlement of Puerto Rico ("rich port").Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico's administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain's hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area now known as Old San Juan. The area is filled with cobblestone streets and brightly painted, colonial-era structures, and its fortifications have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Old San Juan is a monument to the past, but most of the rest of the city is planted firmly in the 21st century and draws migrants island-wide and from farther afield to jobs in its businesses and industries. The city captivates residents and visitors alike with its vibrant lifestyle as well as its balmy beaches, pulsing nightclubs, globe-spanning restaurants, and world-class museums. Once you set foot in this city, you may never want to leave.
Gustavia, Saint Barthélemy image
Day 5
Gustavia, Saint Barthélemy
You can easily explore all of Gustavia during a two-hour stroll. Some shops close from noon to 3 or 4, so plan lunch accordingly, but stores stay open past 7 in the evening. Parking in Gustavia is a challenge, especially during vacation times. A good spot to park is rue de la République, alongside the catamarans, yachts, and sailboats.
Roseau, Dominica image
Day 6
Roseau, Dominica
Although it's one of the smallest capitals in the Caribbean, Roseau has the highest concentration of inhabitants of any town in the eastern Caribbean. Caribbean vernacular architecture and a bustling marketplace transport visitors back in time. Although you can walk the entire town in about an hour, you'll get a much better feel for the place on a leisurely stroll. For some years now, the Society for Historical Architectural Preservation and Enhancement (SHAPE) has organized programs and projects to preserve the city's architectural heritage. Several interesting buildings have already been restored. Lilac House, on Kennedy Avenue, has three types of gingerbread fretwork, latticed verandah railings, and heavy hurricane shutters. The J.W. Edwards Building, at the corner of Old and King George V sreets, has a stone base and a wooden second-floor gallery. The Old Market Plaza is the center of Roseau's historic district, which was laid out by the French on a radial plan rather than a grid, so streets such as Hanover, King George V, and Old radiate from this area. South of the marketplace is the Fort Young Hotel, built as a British fort in the 18th century; the nearby statehouse, public library, and Anglican cathedral are also worth a visit. New developments at the bay front on Dame M.E. Charles Boulevard have brightened up the waterfront.
Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda image
Day 7
Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda
With its superb beaches, historical attractions and beautiful coral reefs, Antigua provides a host of diversions. It is said that the island contains 365 beaches, one for every day of the year. Antigua maintains its traditional West Indian character, with gingerbread-house style architecture, calypso music and carnival festivities. St John’s has been the administrative capital since the island’s colonisation in 1632, and has been the seat of government since it gained independence in 1981. From the port you can explore the colourful Redcliffe district, with its restored wooden houses, and Heritage Quay with its shopping mall and craft shops. The city has some fine examples of Colonial architecture, including the twin-towered cathedral, built in 1845 and considered one of the finest church buildings in the Caribbean. All coaches in Antigua are operated by smaller vehicles, and commentary will be given by a driver/guide.
River travel image
Days 8 - 9
River travel
Nassau, Bahamas image
Day 10
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau's sheltered harbor bustles with cruise-ship activity, while a block away Bay Street's sidewalks are crowded with shoppers who duck into air-conditioned boutiques and relax on benches in the shade of mahogany and lignum vitae trees. Shops angle for tourist dollars with fine imported goods at duty-free prices, yet you'll find a handful of stores overflowing with authentic Bahamian crafts, food supplies, and other delights. With a revitalization of downtown ongoing—the revamped British Colonial Hilton leading the way—Nassau is recapturing some of its past glamour. Nevertheless, modern influences are completely apparent: fancy restaurants, suave clubs, and trendy coffeehouses have popped up everywhere. These changes have come partly in response to the growing number of upper-crust crowds that now supplement the spring breakers and cruise passengers who have traditionally flocked to Nassau. Of course, you can still find a wild club or a rowdy bar, but you can also sip cappuccino while viewing contemporary Bahamian art or dine by candlelight beneath prints of old Nassau, serenaded by soft, island-inspired calypso music. A trip to Nassau wouldn't be complete without a stop at some of the island's well-preserved historic buildings. The large, pink colonial-style edifices house Parliament and some of the courts, while others, like Fort Charlotte, date back to the days when pirates ruled the town. Take a tour via horse-drawn carriage for the full effect.
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 11
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
Ship Details
Regent Seven Seas Cruises
Seven Seas Mariner

If you wish to sail amidst the stunning glaciers of Alaska in comfort and style, you’ll find your ideal voyage in the summer itineraries of Seven Seas Mariner®. In other seasons, the ship explores the wonders of Asia, Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.

Find your perfect cruise!
Cabins
All Prices