32 nights onboard Seven Seas Grandeur

Nordic Wonders & European Charms

Winners 2022 Best Luxury Ocean Cruise Line

For nearly thirty years, we have delivered unrivalled experiences throughout the world. All the while, we have been listening to our guests, evolving our services and continually refining each element of the Regent experience. With every luxury included, we ensure you are free to embrace every moment of your journey. And this all begins with a ship that elevates the pinnacle of ocean cruising to new heights.

Leaving from: Reykjavík
Cruise ship: Seven Seas Grandeur
Departure date: 27th July 2025
Leaving from: Reykjavík Isafjørdur Akureyri Tórshavn and 29 more stops
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Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Regent is almost in a class of its own, offering luxury on an incredible scale with original Picassos, an acre of marble and 500 chandeliers aboard Seven Seas Explorer, Seven Seas Splendor and Seven Seas Grandeur.

The most opulent suites in all three - at around £8,000 a night - feature grand pianos, private bars and even their own spas. The signature Compass Rose restaurant is an absolute must-see.

750
Passengers
542
Crew
2023
Launched
55254t
Tonnage
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Day 2
Isafjørdur, Iceland
Day 3
Akureyri, Iceland
Day 4
At Sea
Day 5
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Day 6
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Day 7
Måløy, Norway
Day 8
Nordfjordeid, Norway
Day 9
Bergen, Norway
Day 10
Ulvik, Norway
Day 11
Haugesund, Norway
Day 12
Arendal, Norway
Days 13 - 14
Oslo, Norway
Day 15
Skagen, Denmark
Day 16
At Sea
Day 17
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Day 18
Zeebrugge, Belgium
Day 19
Southampton, England
Day 20
At Sea
Day 21
Cobh, Ireland
Day 22
Bantry Bay, Ireland
Day 23
Dingle, Ireland
Day 24
Galway, Ireland
Day 25
Killybegs, Ireland
Day 26
Londonderry, Northern Ireland
Day 27
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Day 28
Liverpool, England
Day 29
Dun Laoghaire, Ireland
Day 30
Fishguard, Wales
Day 31
Isle of Portland, England
Day 32
At Sea
Day 33
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Reykjavík, Iceland image
Day 1
Reykjavík, Iceland
Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.
Isafjørdur, Iceland image
Day 2
Isafjørdur, Iceland
Two colossal terraces of sheer rock stand either side of this extraordinarily located town - which rides a jutting spit onto an immensity of black fjord water. Surprisingly, considering the remoteness of its location and its compact size, Isafjordur is a modern and lively place to visit, offering a great choice of cafes and delicious restaurants – which are well stocked to impress visitors. The town is a perfectly located base for adventures amongst Iceland's fantastic wilderness - with skiing, hiking and water-sports popular pursuits among visitors.
Akureyri, Iceland image
Day 3
Akureyri, Iceland

Northeast of the country’s capital city Reykjavík lies Akureyri, the oldest and second-largest town in Iceland. The charming, pint-sized city may be small in size with a population of just 20,000, but it is a surprisingly lively place with a wealth of attractions and activities, not to mention remarkable natural wonders. Boasting one of the best skiing areas in the country as well as great hiking trails, an 18-hole golf course and Icelandic swimming pools, Akureyri is an ideal port of call for the active among you, as well cruise passengers in search of the elusive and ethereal northern lights.

At Sea image
Day 4
At Sea
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands image
Day 5
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland image
Day 6
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Founded by Dutch fishermen in the 17th century, Lerwick today is a busy town and administrative center. Handsome stone buildings—known as lodberries—line the harbor; they provided loading bays for goods, some of them illegal. The town's twisting flagstone lanes and harbor once heaved with activity, and Lerwick is still an active port today. This is also where most visitors to Shetland dock, spilling out of cruise ships, allowing passengers to walk around the town.
Måløy, Norway image
Day 7
Måløy, Norway
Nordfjordeid, Norway image
Day 8
Nordfjordeid, Norway
Bergen, Norway image
Day 9
Bergen, Norway

Surrounded by mountains and sparkling fjords, the waterside city of Bergen has a spectacular setting. There has been a settlement here since medieval times and the colourful waterfront buildings of the Hanseatic wharf, known as Bryggen, are testament to its fascinating history of trade. As Norway’s best known medieval settlement, the Bryggen is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Our comprehensive selection of excursions allows you to discover the many sides of Bergen, such as the fish market and narrow cobbled streets, as well as stunning views of the city from the summit of Mt Fløyen. Alternatively, those who have visited the city previously may like to experience one of the tours that travel further afield. Just 300 yards from the main piers, you will find the Fortress Museum (Fesningsmuseum), which has an interesting collection of objects related to World War II.

Ulvik, Norway image
Day 10
Ulvik, Norway
Haugesund, Norway image
Day 11
Haugesund, Norway
Arendal, Norway image
Day 12
Arendal, Norway
You’ll weave between glowing lighthouses and picturesque islands, as you approach the quaint Norwegian town of Arendal. Set on the southern coast, and spanning seven islands, Arendal is a place to slow the pace, and unwind surrounded by Norway’s easy-going beauty. Ferries – and boat hiring opportunities - make exploring easy, or you can get out on foot or two wheels to throw yourself into the thick of the area’s outstanding natural beauty. Arendal's twin lighthouses are the first thing you'll see, as your ship leaves the open ocean, and heads to Arendal itself. The perfect focal point for any photo, Store Torungen is still in working order - witness it flashing its warnings to passing ships, as they navigate the tricky islands and skerries that are scattered across the waters. Cafes and shell-fish sellers welcome you to the city centre as you step off the ship, and you’re immediately well placed to slow the pace, and wander beside glistening water. Or, why not stretch your legs by escaping to the countryside and cycling along wooden pathways that skirt glistening lakes?
Oslo, Norway image
Days 13 - 14
Oslo, Norway
Oslo is the capital of Norway and is also its largest city, situated at the head of Oslo Fjord and surrounded by hills and forests. Home to some 50 museums and full of galleries, cafés, a sculpture park and the Royal Palace, this vibrant city with its handsome 19th-century buildings and wide streets has much to offer. Its history dates back 1,000 years, and includes a rich seafaring heritage that ranges from the Viking era to Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon Tiki expedition. Discover more about this exciting city on our varied selection of excursions.
Skagen, Denmark image
Day 15
Skagen, Denmark
At Sea image
Day 16
At Sea
Amsterdam, Netherlands image
Day 17
Amsterdam, Netherlands

Amsterdam combines the unrivaled beauty of the 17th-century Golden Age city center with plenty of museums and art of the highest order, not to mention a remarkably laid-back atmosphere. It all comes together to make this one of the world's most appealing and offbeat metropolises in the world. Built on a latticework of concentric canals like an aquatic rainbow, Amsterdam is known as the City of Canals—but it's no Venice, content to live on moonlight serenades and former glory. Quite the contrary: on nearly every street here you'll find old and new side by side—quiet corners where time seems to be holding its breath next to streets like neon-lit Kalverstraat, and Red Light ladies strutting by the city's oldest church. Indeed, Amsterdam has as many lovely facets as a 40-carat diamond polished by one of the city's gem cutters. It's certainly a metropolis, but a rather small and very accessible one. Locals tend to refer to it as a big village, albeit one that happens to pack the cultural wallop of a major world destination. There are scores of concerts every day, numerous museums, summertime festivals, and, of course, a legendary year-round party scene. It's pretty much impossible to resist Amsterdam's charms. With 7,000 registered monuments, most of which began as the residences and warehouses of humble merchants, set on 160 man-made canals, and traversed by 1,500 or so bridges, Amsterdam has the largest historical inner city in Europe. Its famous circle of waterways, the grachtengordel, was a 17th-century urban expansion plan for the rich and is a lasting testament to the city’s Golden Age. This town is endearing because of its kinder, gentler nature—but a reputation for championing sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll does not alone account for Amsterdam's being one of the most popular destinations in Europe: consider that within a single square mile the city harbors some of the greatest achievements in Western art, from Rembrandt to Van Gogh. Not to mention that this is one of Europe's great walking cities, with so many of its treasures in the untouted details: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, hidden garden courtyards, shop windows, floating houseboats, hidden hofjes(courtyards with almshouses), sudden vistas of church spires, and gabled roofs that look like so many unframed paintings. And don’t forget that the joy lies in details: elaborate gables and witty gable stones denoting the trade of a previous owner. Keep in mind that those XXX symbols you see all over town are not a mark of the city's triple-X reputation. They're part of Amsterdam's official coat of arms—three St. Andrew's crosses, believed to represent the three dangers that have traditionally plagued the city: flood, fire, and pestilence. The coat's motto ("Valiant, determined, compassionate") was introduced in 1947 by Queen Wilhelmina in remembrance of the 1941 February Strike in Amsterdam—the first time in Europe that non-Jewish people protested against the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime.

Zeebrugge, Belgium image
Day 18
Zeebrugge, Belgium
In 1895 work began to construct a new seaport and harbour next to the tiny village of Zeebrugge, situated on the North Sea coast. Today the fast-expanding port of Zeebrugge is one of the busiest in Europe and its marina is Belgium’s most important fishing port. Many attempts were made to destroy this important port during both World Wars. Zeebrugge is ideally located for discovering the historic city of Bruges, and delightful seaside resorts with long sandy beaches can be visited by using the trams that run the whole length of the Belgian coast. Please note that no food may be taken ashore in Belgium. We shall not be offering shuttle buses to Bruges, but you may visit the city on an optional excursion: those visiting Bruges should note that there may be quite a long walk from the coach to the town centre.
Southampton, England image
Day 19
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

At Sea image
Day 20
At Sea
Cobh, Ireland image
Day 21
Cobh, Ireland

The last port of call on the Titanic’s ill-fated voyage, the seaside town on Ireland’s south coast has a historic maritime legacy. One of the major transatlantic Irish ports, Cobh (pronounced ‘Cove’ and formerly known as Queenstown) was also the departure point for 2.5 million of the six million Irish people who emigrated to North America between 1848 and 1950. While visitors flock to Cobh to learn about its fascinating maritime and emigration history, they will also find the picturesque town blessed with a beautiful cathedral and a burgeoning bar and restaurant scene.

Bantry Bay, Ireland image
Day 22
Bantry Bay, Ireland
Dingle, Ireland image
Day 23
Dingle, Ireland
Galway, Ireland image
Day 24
Galway, Ireland
Galway is a city in the West of Ireland in the province of Connacht. It lies on the River Corrib between Lough Corrib and Galway Bay and is surrounded by County Galway. It is the fourth most populous urban area in the Republic of Ireland and the sixth most populous city in the island of Ireland. It is both a picturesque and lively city with a wonderful avant-garde culture and a fascinating mixture of locally owned speciality shops, often featuring locally made crafts. Indeed local handcrafts are a feature of the entire region including hand knits, pottery, glass, jewellery and woodwork. The city’s hub is 18th-century Eyre Square, a popular meeting spot surrounded by shops, and traditional pubs that often offer live Irish folk music. Nearby, stone-clad cafes, boutiques and art galleries line the winding lanes of the Latin Quarter, which retains portions of the medieval city walls. The city bears the nickname "The City of the Tribes" because "fourteen tribes" of merchant families led the city in its Hiberno-Norman period. The merchants would have seen themselves as Irish gentry and loyal to the King. They later adopted the term as a badge of honour and pride in defiance of the town's Cromwellian occupier.
Killybegs, Ireland image
Day 25
Killybegs, Ireland
Killybegs The days start early in Killybegs, as this quiet fishing town rumbles to life, and ships with red and blue paint peeling from their hulls quietly depart, ready for a morning's hard work at sea. Located in a scenic part of County Donegal, Killybegs is Ireland's fishing capital, and the salty breeze and pretty streets serve as a revitalising medicine for visitors. The town is also your gateway to some of the country's most majestic coastal scenery, which is dotted with flashing white lighthouses, keeping watch over invigorating seascapes. Killybegs enjoys a privileged position on the coast of north west of Ireland, close to the spectacular Slieve League - a titanic mountain, which explodes upwards from frothing ocean. Walk as close as you dare to the coastline’s sheer drops, or admire the folding cliffs from the best vantage point, down on the water.
Londonderry, Northern Ireland image
Day 26
Londonderry, Northern Ireland
Nestled behind lofty city walls, Londonderry is a destination of culture, which boasts an increasingly envied reputation. This Northern Irish city is still riding on the momentum of a fantastic 2013, when it was named as UK City of Culture, and singled out as one of Lonely Planet's top 5 destinations to visit. The wonderfully preserved city walls are perhaps Londonderry's most treasured charm, and they encircle 1,450 years of history, and are over 400 years old. The walls came to the fore of the city's history during the Siege of Derry, back in 1688 - when King James's forces attacked, causing mass starvation and suffering over 105 days of stalemate. It takes approximately an hour to wander the entire circuit of the walls, and see their seven gates, and you’ll absorb a feast of information along the way. View the mighty cannons that boomed during the siege, or stop into one of the plentiful cafes, should you need a little refreshment before continuing your journey. St. Columb’s Cathedral, which dates back to 1633, towers over the walled city, and is one of the city's most significant historic sites. Its dreamy spire contains a set of bells that have peeled out melodies here since 1638, making them Ireland's oldest.
Belfast, Northern Ireland image
Day 27
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.
Liverpool, England image
Day 28
Liverpool, England

The home of the Three Graces, the Beatles and countless art galleries and museums to rival London, the northern maritime city is a cultural and historic destination. Once one of the world’s greatest trading hubs, Liverpool is today one of the most visited cities in the United Kingdom due to its wealth of attractions.

Dun Laoghaire, Ireland image
Day 29
Dun Laoghaire, Ireland
Fishguard, Wales image
Day 30
Fishguard, Wales
Isle of Portland, England image
Day 31
Isle of Portland, England
The Isle of Portland is a tied island, 6 kilometres long by 2.7 kilometres wide, in the English Channel. The southern tip, Portland Bill lies 8 kilometres south of the resort of Weymouth, forming the southernmost point of the county of Dorset, England. A barrier beach called Chesil Beach joins it to the mainland.
At Sea image
Day 32
At Sea
Amsterdam, Netherlands image
Day 33
Amsterdam, Netherlands

Amsterdam combines the unrivaled beauty of the 17th-century Golden Age city center with plenty of museums and art of the highest order, not to mention a remarkably laid-back atmosphere. It all comes together to make this one of the world's most appealing and offbeat metropolises in the world. Built on a latticework of concentric canals like an aquatic rainbow, Amsterdam is known as the City of Canals—but it's no Venice, content to live on moonlight serenades and former glory. Quite the contrary: on nearly every street here you'll find old and new side by side—quiet corners where time seems to be holding its breath next to streets like neon-lit Kalverstraat, and Red Light ladies strutting by the city's oldest church. Indeed, Amsterdam has as many lovely facets as a 40-carat diamond polished by one of the city's gem cutters. It's certainly a metropolis, but a rather small and very accessible one. Locals tend to refer to it as a big village, albeit one that happens to pack the cultural wallop of a major world destination. There are scores of concerts every day, numerous museums, summertime festivals, and, of course, a legendary year-round party scene. It's pretty much impossible to resist Amsterdam's charms. With 7,000 registered monuments, most of which began as the residences and warehouses of humble merchants, set on 160 man-made canals, and traversed by 1,500 or so bridges, Amsterdam has the largest historical inner city in Europe. Its famous circle of waterways, the grachtengordel, was a 17th-century urban expansion plan for the rich and is a lasting testament to the city’s Golden Age. This town is endearing because of its kinder, gentler nature—but a reputation for championing sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll does not alone account for Amsterdam's being one of the most popular destinations in Europe: consider that within a single square mile the city harbors some of the greatest achievements in Western art, from Rembrandt to Van Gogh. Not to mention that this is one of Europe's great walking cities, with so many of its treasures in the untouted details: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, hidden garden courtyards, shop windows, floating houseboats, hidden hofjes(courtyards with almshouses), sudden vistas of church spires, and gabled roofs that look like so many unframed paintings. And don’t forget that the joy lies in details: elaborate gables and witty gable stones denoting the trade of a previous owner. Keep in mind that those XXX symbols you see all over town are not a mark of the city's triple-X reputation. They're part of Amsterdam's official coat of arms—three St. Andrew's crosses, believed to represent the three dangers that have traditionally plagued the city: flood, fire, and pestilence. The coat's motto ("Valiant, determined, compassionate") was introduced in 1947 by Queen Wilhelmina in remembrance of the 1941 February Strike in Amsterdam—the first time in Europe that non-Jewish people protested against the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime.

Ship Details
Regent Seven Seas Cruises
Seven Seas Grandeur

For nearly thirty years, we have delivered unrivalled experiences throughout the world. All the while, we have been listening to our guests, evolving our services and continually refining each element of the Regent experience. With every luxury included, we ensure you are free to embrace every moment of your journey. And this all begins with a ship that elevates the pinnacle of ocean cruising to new heights.

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