11 nights onboard Azamara Quest

11-Night Eastern Caribbean Voyage

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Your boutique hotel at sea, the Azamara Quest® is a mid-sized ship with a deck plan that’s intimate but never crowded, and offers everything modern voyagers are looking for—plus some unexpected extras.

Leaving from: Miami, Florida
Cruise ship: Azamara Quest
Visiting: Miami, Florida Saint John Island Charlotte Amalie Philipsburg
Azamara Logo
Azamara

Sold by Royal Caribbean Group in January 2021, Azamara is already expanding under its new owners, Sycamore Partners. The destination-focused line has brought forth a ship, Azamara Onward - the former Pacific Princess - which, like the rest of the fleet, is a Renaissance Cruises R-class. But regular customers needn't worry.

In fact, they'll notice little change under the new ownership, as many itineraries will continue to be based on single countries, with late nights and overnight stays in port. The signature AzAmazing evenings - exclusive shore-based cultural events - and optional pre or post-cruise land tours are also staying.

690
Passengers
408
Crew
2000
Launched
2016
Last refit
30277t
Tonnage
180m
Length
25m
Width
18kts
Speed
8
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Day 4
Saint John Island, U.S. Virgin Islands
Day 5
Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands
Day 6
Philipsburg, Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
Day 7
Charlestown, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Day 8
Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda
Day 9
Saint Pierre, Saint Pierre and Miquelon
Day 10
Port Elizabeth, Bequia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Day 11
Saint George's, Grenada
Day 12
Bridgetown, Barbados
Miami, Florida, United States image
Day 1
Miami, Florida, United States
Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.
Saint John Island, U.S. Virgin Islands image
Day 4
Saint John Island, U.S. Virgin Islands
St. John, the smallest most idyllic of the three United States Virgin Islands, is best known for its dozens of post card perfect white sand beaches, turquoise bays abounding in colourful corals & rainbows of tropical fish endless vistas of green velvet hills. Only nine miles long (14.5 kilometres) and three miles (4.8 kilometres) wide, two thirds of the island is the Virgin Islands National Park, so its spectacular beaches & untouched forests will remain that way for generations to come and remain accessible to all. There are tours of the National Park by Jeep or safari bus and hikes on spectacular trails led by Park Rangers who enrich the experience with talks on the island's history and geology as well as its flora & fauna. While it is only twenty minutes from St. Thomas by convenient hourly ferry, St. John is the peaceful, uncommercialised paradise of island fantasies. It has no high-rise buildings, cruise ship docks or airport. Visitors can obtain discounted air fares to St. Thomas. Despite its unspoiled atmosphere, it offers every facility and amenity found at major resorts.
Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands image
Day 5
Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands
Philipsburg, Sint Maarten (Dutch part) image
Day 6
Philipsburg, Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
The capital of Dutch St. Maarten stretches about a mile (1½ km) along an isthmus between Great Bay and the Salt Pond and has five parallel streets. Most of the village's dozens of shops and restaurants are on Front Street, narrow and cobblestone, closest to Great Bay. It's generally congested when cruise ships are in port, because of its many duty-free shops and several casinos. Little lanes called steegjes connect Front Street with Back Street, which has fewer shops and considerably less congestion. Along the beach is a ½-mile-long (1-km-long) boardwalk with restaurants and several Wi-Fi hot spots.Wathey Square (pronounced watty) is in the heart of the village. Directly across from the square are the town hall and the courthouse, in a striking white building with cupola. The structure was built in 1793 and has served as the commander's home, a fire station, a jail, and a post office. The streets surrounding the square are lined with hotels, duty-free shops, restaurants, and cafés. The Captain Hodge Pier, just off the square, is a good spot to view Great Bay and the beach that stretches alongside.
Charlestown, Saint Kitts and Nevis image
Day 7
Charlestown, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda image
Day 8
Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda
With its superb beaches, historical attractions and beautiful coral reefs, Antigua provides a host of diversions. It is said that the island contains 365 beaches, one for every day of the year. Antigua maintains its traditional West Indian character, with gingerbread-house style architecture, calypso music and carnival festivities. St John’s has been the administrative capital since the island’s colonisation in 1632, and has been the seat of government since it gained independence in 1981. From the port you can explore the colourful Redcliffe district, with its restored wooden houses, and Heritage Quay with its shopping mall and craft shops. The city has some fine examples of Colonial architecture, including the twin-towered cathedral, built in 1845 and considered one of the finest church buildings in the Caribbean. All coaches in Antigua are operated by smaller vehicles, and commentary will be given by a driver/guide.
Saint Pierre, Saint Pierre and Miquelon image
Day 9
Saint Pierre, Saint Pierre and Miquelon
By heading almost due east from Cap-aux-Meules in Canada, it is possible to reach France in about one day’s worth of steaming! With barely 6,000 inhabitants living on tiny St. Pierre, it is the smallest French Overseas Collective. The residents of St. Pierre are predominantly descendants of Normans, Basque and Bretons and the French spoken is closer to Metropolitan French than to Canadian French. Although Basque is not spoken any longer, the influence is still felt through sport and a Basque Festival. Interestingly, this small island has two museums in part dedicated to the Prohibition. The Musée Heritage is St. Pierre’s newest museum with a focus on medical artefacts from the 19th and 20th century. Another claim to fame is a guillotine, the only one ever used in North America. In this quirky village it is easy to find the Post Office; just look for the clock tower shaped like a praying monk.
Port Elizabeth, Bequia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines image
Day 10
Port Elizabeth, Bequia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Bequia is a Carib word meaning "island of the cloud." Hilly and green with several golden-sand beaches, Bequia is 9 miles (14½ km) south of St. Vincent's southwestern shore; with a population of 5,000, it's the largest of the Grenadines. Although boatbuilding, whaling, and fishing have been the predominant industries here for generations, sailing has now become almost synonymous with Bequia. Admiralty Bay is a favored anchorage for both privately owned and chartered yachts. Lodgings range from comfortable resorts and villas to cozy West Indian—style inns. Bequia's airport and the frequent ferry service from St. Vincent make this a favorite destination for day-trippers, as well. The ferry docks in Port Elizabeth, a tiny town with waterfront bars, restaurants, and shops where you can buy handmade souvenirs—including the exquisitely detailed model sailboats that are a famous Bequia export. The Easter Regatta is held during the four-day Easter weekend, when revelers gather to watch boat races and celebrate the island's seafaring traditions with food, music, dancing, and competitive games.To see the views, villages, beaches, and boatbuilding sites around Bequia, hire a taxi at the jetty in Port Elizabeth. Several usually line up under the almond trees to meet each ferry from St. Vincent.
Saint George's, Grenada image
Day 11
Saint George's, Grenada
Nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, cocoa those heady aromas fill the air in Grenada (pronounced gruh-nay-da). Only 21 miles (33½ km) long and 12 miles (19½ km) wide, the Isle of Spice is a tropical gem of lush rain forests, white-sand beaches, secluded coves, exotic flowers, and enough locally grown spices to fill anyone's kitchen cabinet. St. George's is one of the most picturesque capital cities in the Caribbean, St. George's Harbour is one of the most picturesque harbors, and Grenada's Grand Anse Beach is one of the region's finest beaches. The island has friendly, hospitable people and enough good shopping, restaurants, historic sites, and natural wonders to make it a popular port of call. About one-third of Grenada's visitors arrive by cruise ship, and that number continues to grow each year. Grenada's capital is a bustling West Indian city, much of which remains unchanged from colonial days. Narrow streets lined with shops wind up, down, and across steep hills. Brick warehouses cling to the waterfront, and pastel-painted homes rise from the waterfront and disappear into steep green hills. The horseshoe-shaped St. George's Harbour, a submerged volcanic crater, is arguably the prettiest harbor in the Caribbean. Schooners, ferries, and tour boats tie up along the seawall or at the small dinghy dock. The Carenage (pronounced car-a-nahzh), which surrounds the harbor, is the capital's center. Warehouses, shops, and restaurants line the waterfront. The Christ of the Deep statue that sits on the pedestrian plaza at the center of The Carenage was presented to Grenada by Costa Cruise Line in remembrance of its ship, Bianca C, which burned and sank in the harbor in 1961 and is now a favorite dive site. An engineering feat for its time, the 340-foot-long Sendall Tunnel was built in 1895 and named for Walter Sendall, an early governor. The narrow tunnel, used by both pedestrians and vehicles, separates the harbor side of St. George's from the Esplanade on the bay side of town, where you can find the markets (produce, meat, and fish), the Cruise Ship Terminal, the Esplanade Mall, and the public bus station.
Bridgetown, Barbados image
Day 12
Bridgetown, Barbados
It's time to immerse yourself in the vibrant atmosphere of Bridgetown's historic center, where local points of interest are peppered between national wonders. Wander along Broad Street, the bustling main thoroughfare lined with shops, cafes, and colonial-era architecture. For authentic Caribbean cuisine, head to Baxter's Road, renowned for its street food stalls serving up savory delights like flying fish and cou-cou. Experience the true essence of the Caribbean mantra as you mingle with friendly locals and savor the flavors of Barbadian cuisine.
Ship Details
Azamara
Azamara Quest

Your boutique hotel at sea, the Azamara Quest® is a mid-sized ship with a deck plan that’s intimate but never crowded, and offers everything modern voyagers are looking for—plus some unexpected extras.

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