9 nights onboard Silver Wind

Copenhagen to Dublin

A major upgrade in December 2018 saw Silver Wind looking better than ever. A second refurbishment in summer 2021 will see her benefitting from a strengthened to ice-class hull and will make her one of the most adaptable ships in our fleet.

Leaving from: Copenhagen
Cruise ship: Silver Wind
Visiting: Copenhagen Lysebotn Lysefjord Ulvik
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Silversea Cruises

Wellness should be about balanced indulgence, not self-sacrifice - that's the philosophy behind Silversea's new programme called Otium, named after the Roman leisure time dedicated to bathing, talking, singing, drinking, eating and relaxing. The easygoing regime includes a 24-hour room-service menu of comfort food, as well as new spa treatments, relaxing baths and hot chocolate served on your balcony.

298
Passengers
222
Crew
1995
Launched
2018
Last refit
17400t
Tonnage
156.7m
Length
21.5m
Width
20kts
Speed
6
Decks
USD
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Copenhagen, Denmark
Day 3
Lysebotn, Norway
Day 3
Lysefjord, Norway
Day 4
Ulvik, Norway
Day 4
Hardangerfjord, Norway
Day 5
Bekkjarvik, Norway
Day 6
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Day 6
Isle of Noss, Scotland
Day 7
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
Day 8
Shiant Isles, Scotland
Day 8
Loch Ewe, Scotland
Day 9
Isle of Lunga, Scotland
Day 10
Dublin, Ireland
.
Copenhagen, Denmark image
Day 1
Copenhagen, Denmark

By the 11th century, Copenhagen was already an important trading and fishing centre and today you will find an attractive city which, although the largest in Scandinavia, has managed to retain its low-level skyline. Discover some of the famous attractions including Gefion Fountain and Amalienborg Palace, perhaps cruise the city’s waterways, visit Rosenborg Castle or explore the medieval fishing village of Dragoer. Once the home of Hans Christian Andersen, Copenhagen features many reminders of its fairytale heritage and lives up to the reputation immortalised in the famous song ‘Wonderful Copenhagen’.

Lysebotn, Norway image
Day 3
Lysebotn, Norway
Lysefjord, Norway image
Day 3
Lysefjord, Norway

DUMMY PORT COPY

Ulvik, Norway image
Day 4
Ulvik, Norway
Hardangerfjord, Norway image
Day 4
Hardangerfjord, Norway

Nicknamed the ‘Queen of the Fjords’, Hardangerfjord is the fourth longest fjord in the world and the second-longest in Norway. One of the most breathtaking fjords in Norway, the Hardanger area is home to Folgefonna National Park and the third-largest glacier in the country. The fjord stretches 111 miles from the Atlantic Ocean into the mountainous interior of Norway along the Hardangervidda plateau, offering up spectacular scenery along the way, from towering mountains to picturesque orchards. Its deepest waters, located just outside the village of Norheimsund in the middle of the fjord, run to a depth of more than 2,820 feet.

Bekkjarvik, Norway image
Day 5
Bekkjarvik, Norway
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland image
Day 6
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Founded by Dutch fishermen in the 17th century, Lerwick today is a busy town and administrative center. Handsome stone buildings—known as lodberries—line the harbor; they provided loading bays for goods, some of them illegal. The town's twisting flagstone lanes and harbor once heaved with activity, and Lerwick is still an active port today. This is also where most visitors to Shetland dock, spilling out of cruise ships, allowing passengers to walk around the town.
Isle of Noss, Scotland image
Day 6
Isle of Noss, Scotland
Exploring the sandstone cliff faces of the Isle of Noss will reveal ledges loaded with gannets, puffins, guillemots, shags, kittiwakes, Razorbills, fulmars and Great Skuas. The island was recognized as a National Nature Reserve in 1955, and has one of Europe’s largest and most diverse seabird colonies. Sheep have grazed the inland hillsides of Noss since the late 1800s and early 1900s when around twenty people lived on the island to manage the sheep farm. Along with the sheep, shaggy Shetland ponies graze the windblown slopes of Noss.
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland image
Day 7
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.
Shiant Isles, Scotland image
Day 8
Shiant Isles, Scotland
Loch Ewe, Scotland image
Day 8
Loch Ewe, Scotland
Isle of Lunga, Scotland image
Day 9
Isle of Lunga, Scotland
The stunning Isle of Lunga is the largest island in the Treshnish archipelago. With volcanic origin the isle was populated until the 19th Century, and remains of black houses can be seen around this magnificent coastal jewel. Abundant plant life and exotic birdlife are now the main inhabitants of the area. Fortunate visitors view the magnificent array of birds, especially the great puffins that breed on the islands plateau. One can sit within just a few feet away without disturbing the avian ambassador’s peace. The 81 hectare island is home to many rare and endangered plants such as, primroses and orchids. Views over the landscape and across the ocean can be seen from the 300 foot high cliffs.
Dublin, Ireland image
Day 10
Dublin, Ireland
Dublin is making a comeback. The decade-long "Celtic Tiger" boom era was quickly followed by the Great Recession, but The Recovery has finally taken a precarious hold. For visitors, this newer and wiser Dublin has become one of western Europe's most popular and delightful urban destinations. Whether or not you're out to enjoy the old or new Dublin, you'll find it a colossally entertaining city, all the more astonishing considering its intimate size.It is ironic and telling that James Joyce chose Dublin as the setting for his famous Ulysses, Dubliners, and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man because it was a "center of paralysis" where nothing much ever changed. Which only proves that even the greats get it wrong sometimes. Indeed, if Joyce were to return to his once-genteel hometown today—disappointed with the city's provincial outlook, he left it in 1902 at the age of 20—and take a quasi-Homeric odyssey through the city (as he so famously does in Ulysses), would he even recognize Dublin as his "Dear Dirty Dumpling, foostherfather of fingalls and dotthergills"?For instance, what would he make of Temple Bar—the city's erstwhile down-at-the-heels neighborhood, now crammed with cafés and trendy hotels and suffused with a nonstop, international-party atmosphere? Or the simple sophistication of the open-air restaurants of the tiny Italian Quarter (named Quartier Bloom after his own creation), complete with sultry tango lessons? Or of the hot–cool Irishness, where every aspect of Celtic culture results in sold-out theaters, from Once, the cult indie movie and Broadway hit, to Riverdance, the old Irish mass-jig recast as a Las Vegas extravaganza? Plus, the resurrected Joyce might be stirred by the songs of Hozier, fired up by the sultry acting of Michael Fassbender, and moved by the award-winning novels of Colum McCann. As for Ireland's capital, it's packed with elegant shops and hotels, theaters, galleries, coffeehouses, and a stunning variety of new, creative little restaurants can be found on almost every street in Dublin, transforming the provincial city that suffocated Joyce into a place almost as cosmopolitan as the Paris to which he fled. And the locals are a hell of a lot more fun! Now that the economy has finally turned a corner, Dublin citizens can cast a cool eye over the last 20 crazy years. Some argue that the boomtown transformation of their heretofore-tranquil city has permanently affected its spirit and character. These skeptics (skepticism long being a favorite pastime in the capital city) await the outcome of "Dublin: The Sequel," and their greatest fear is the possibility that the tattered old lady on the Liffey has become a little less unique, a little more like everywhere else.Oh ye of little faith: the rare ole gem that is Dublin is far from buried. The fundamentals—the Georgian elegance of Merrion Square, the Norman drama of Christ Church Cathedral, the foamy pint at an atmospheric pub—are still on hand to gratify. Most of all, there are the locals themselves: the nod and grin when you catch their eye on the street, the eagerness to hear half your life story before they tell you all of theirs, and their paradoxically dark but warm sense of humor. It's expected that 2016 will be an extra-special year in the capital, as centenary celebrations of the fateful 1916 Easter Rising will dominate much of the cultural calendar.
Ship Details
Silversea Cruises
Silver Wind

A major upgrade in December 2018 saw Silver Wind looking better than ever. A second refurbishment in summer 2021 will see her benefitting from a strengthened to ice-class hull and will make her one of the most adaptable ships in our fleet.

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