30 nights onboard Arcadia

USA And Canada

Exclusively for adults - Arcadia’s signature features such as her exterior glass-fronted lifts and expansive art collection, featuring no less than 3,000 works of art, create a sophisticated air.

Leaving from: Southampton
Cruise ship: Arcadia
Visiting: Southampton Saint-John's, Newfoundland and Labrador Magdalen Islands, Québec Boston, Massachusetts
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P&O Cruises

Welcome to the P&O cruise experience - where quality and value abide in perfect harmony.

P&O Cruises offer a distinctive style that appeals to both new and veteran travellers alike, with trademark sailings providing opportunities for the whole family to enjoy.

Cruises for those seeking an adult-only vibe are available, while those who prefer smaller ships can choose from more modest vessels.

2094
Passengers
866
Crew
2005
Launched
2017
Last refit
83781t
Tonnage
289m
Length
29m
Width
24kts
Speed
11
Decks
GBP
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Southampton, England
Day 7
Saint-John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Day 9
Magdalen Islands, Québec, Canada
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Days 12 - 13
Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Depart Time: Evening
Day 16
Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Days 17 - 19
New York, New York, United States
Depart Time: Afternoon
Day 21
Portland, Maine, United States
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon
Day 22
Bar Harbor, Maine, United States
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon
Day 23
Saint-John, New Brunswick, Canada
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon
Day 24
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Arrival Time: Morning; Depart Time: Afternoon
Day 25
Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
Arrival Time: Early Morning; Depart Time: Early Evening
Day 31
Southampton, England
Southampton, England image
Day 1
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Saint-John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada image
Day 7
Saint-John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
Old meets new in the province's capital (metro-area population a little more than 200,000), with modern office buildings surrounded by heritage shops and colorful row houses. St. John's mixes English and Irish influences, Victorian architecture and modern convenience, and traditional music and rock and roll into a heady brew. The arts scene is lively, but overall the city moves at a relaxed pace.For centuries, Newfoundland was the largest supplier of salt cod in the world, and St. John's Harbour was the center of the trade. As early as 1627, the merchants of Water Street—then known as the Lower Path—were doing a thriving business buying fish, selling goods, and supplying alcohol to soldiers and sailors.
Magdalen Islands, Québec, Canada image
Day 9
Magdalen Islands, Québec, Canada
The Îles-de-la-Madeleine, or 'Magdalen Islands', form a small archipelago in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence with a land area of 79.36 square miles (205.53 square kilometres). Though closer to Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia, the islands form part of the Canadian province of Quebec. Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine encompass eight major islands: Havre-Aubert, Grande Entrée, Cap aux Meules, Grosse-Île, Havre aux Maisons, Pointe-Aux-Loups, Île d'Entrée and Brion. All except Brion are inhabited. Several other tiny islands are also considered part of the archipelago: Rocher aux Oiseaux; Île aux Loups-marins; Île Paquet; and Rocher du Corps Mort. Although Europeans first arrived on the islands in the mid-1600s, Mi'kmaq Indians had been visiting the islands for hundreds of years, and numerous archaeological sites have been excavated on the archipelago. By the mid-18th century, the islands were inhabited by French-speaking Acadians, and administered as part of the colony of Newfoundland from 1763-1774, when they were annexed to Quebec by the Quebec Act. A segment of the population are English descendants from survivors of the over 400 shipwrecks on the islands. The construction of lighthouses eventually reduced the number of shipwrecks, but many old hulks remain on the beaches and under the waters. Until the 20th century, the islands were completely isolated during the winter months due to the pack ice that made the trip to the mainland impassable by boat. However, a new wireless telegraph station provided Magdalens with year-round communication with the outside world. In recent years, the pristine natural beauty of the Îles-de-la-Madeleine, along with the archipelago's strategic geographic location in the heart of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, has made tourism an important part of the local economy. The well-preserved natural heritage, extraordinarily beautiful marine landscapes and exceptional coastline of the Îles-de-la-Madeleine offer visitors a unique opportunity to explore the area's natural splendour. The panoramic archipelago features dramatic red cliffs, rolling green hills, brightly-coloured houses, intimate inlets, hidden coves, and over 180 miles (290 kilometres) of honey-coloured and white-sand beaches; half of the archipelago's islands are linked by sand dunes. The Îles-de-la-Madeleine are also home to a wealth of diverse marine life, bird species, and flora and fauna to discover. The Îles-de-la-Madeleine offer a truly distinctive blend of Acadian, Madelinot, French and English cultures, traditions and communities that make this breath-taking archipelago a truly unforgettable destination. You can explore the people and history of the islands during visits to the many wonderful museums and interpretation centres, public areas and historical sites, art galleries, artisan workshops, archival centres, performing arts and theatres, industrial facilities, culinary and wine shops, charming boutiques, and cultural and gourmet festivals and events. The exquisite natural and coastal splendour of the Îles-de-la-Madeleine include a host of incredibly scenic and memorable sightseeing venues. Land-based excursions include picturesque nature hikes, walking trails, bicycling, bird-watching, horseback riding, golfing at the Club de golf des Iles, kite-flying, and flightseeing. The teeming coastal waters are ideally-suited for seal- and whale-watching, mariculture, canoeing, sea-kayaking, surfing, windsurfing and kitesurfing, fishing, boating, sailing and Zodiac tours, snorkelling, scuba diving, and more. Private arrangements for independent sightseeing may be requested through the Shore Concierge Office on board the ship.
Boston, Massachusetts, United States image
Days 12 - 13
Boston, Massachusetts, United States
There’s history and culture around every bend in Boston—skyscrapers nestle next to historic hotels while modern marketplaces line the antique cobblestone streets. But to Bostonians, living in a city that blends yesterday and today is just another day in beloved Beantown.
Newport, Rhode Island, United States image
Day 16
Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Established in 1639 by a small band of religious dissenters led by William Coddington and Nicholas Easton, the city by the sea became a haven for those who believed in religious freedom. Newport’s deepwater harbor at the mouth of Narragansett Bay ensured its success as a leading Colonial port, and a building boom produced hundreds of houses and many landmarks that still survive today. These include the Wanton-Lyman-Hazard House and the White Horse Tavern, both built during the 17th century, plus Trinity Church, Touro Synagogue, the Colony House, and the Redwood Library, all built in the 18th century.British troops occupied Newport from 1776–1779, causing half the city’s population to flee and ending a golden age of prosperity. The economic downturn that followed may not have been so great for its citizens but it certainly was for preserving Newport’s architectural heritage, as few had the capital to raze buildings and replace them with bigger and better ones. By the mid-19th century the city had gained a reputation as the summer playground for the very wealthy, who built enormous mansions overlooking the Atlantic. These so-called "summer cottages," occupied for only six to eight weeks a year by the Vanderbilts, Berwinds, Astors, and Belmonts, helped establish the best young American architects. The presence of these wealthy families also brought the New York Yacht Club, which made Newport the venue for the America’s Cup races beginning in 1930 until the 1983 loss to the Australians.The Gilded Age mansions of Bellevue Avenue are what many people associate most with Newport. These late-19th-century homes are almost obscenely grand, laden with ornate rococo detail and designed with a determined one-upmanship.Pedestrian-friendly Newport has so much else to offer in a relatively small geographical area— beaches, seafood restaurants, galleries, shopping, and cultural life. Summer can be crowded, but fall and spring are increasingly popular times of the year to visit.
New York, New York, United States image
Days 17 - 19
New York, New York, United States
From Wall Street's skyscrapers to the neon of Times Square to Central Park's leafy paths, New York City pulses with an irrepressible energy. History meets hipness in this global center of entertainment, fashion, media, and finance. World-class museums like MoMA and unforgettable icons like the Statue of Liberty beckon, but discovering the subtler strains of New York's vast ambition is equally rewarding: ethnic enclaves and shops, historic streets of dignified brownstones, and trendy bars and eateries all add to the urban buzz.
Portland, Maine, United States image
Day 21
Portland, Maine, United States
Portland, Maine The largest city in Maine, Portland was founded in 1632 on the Casco Bay Peninsula. It quickly prospered through shipbuilding and the export of inland pines which made excellent masts. A long line of wooden wharves stretched along the seafront, with the merchants' houses on the hillside above. From the earliest days it was a cosmopolitan city. When the railroads came, the Canada Trunk Line had its terminal right on Portland's quayside, bringing the produce of Canada and the Great Plains one hundred miles closer to Europe than any other major U.S. port. Some of the wharves are now occupied by new condominium developments, with the exception of the Customs House Wharf, which remains much as it used to be. Grand Trunk Station was torn down in 1966 and a revitalization program of this historic section was spearheaded by a group of committed residents. The result was the revival of the Old Port Exchange District with its redbrick streets built in the 1860s following a disastrous fire. The area today features a wide variety of restaurants, specialty and antique shops, and makes for a pleasant place for a stroll. Congress Street and its many side streets are an engaging mixture of culture, commerce and history. Art is everywhere, from the Portland Museum of Art to the many statues and monuments throughout the city. Other points of interest include the Portland Observatory, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's childhood home, several colonial mansions and Fort Williams Park, with the adjacent Portland Head Light. Farther afield one can visit the charming yachting and fishing village of Kennebunkport, also noted as the locale of the home and summer White House of former President George Bush. Going Ashore in Portland Pier Information The ship is scheduled to dock at the Portland Ocean Terminal, a very easy walk to the Old Port District located about two blocks away. Taxis are available at the pier. Shopping A wide range of Maine-made clothing, crafts and imported items can be found in shops along the cobblestone streets of the quaint Old Port Exchange. Small boutiques and numerous art galleries feature everything from paintings, crafts and furniture to prints and photographs. Antique lovers will enjoy browsing through area shops. Bargain hunters may want to visit the designer factory outlet shops in Freeport. On Sundays, most shops are open from 12:00 noon to 5:00-6:00 p.m. The local currency is the dollar. Cuisine Portland has the most restaurants per capita, second only to San Francisco. Eating establishments are as diverse as the menus they offer. The fresh catch of the day can be found on most menus, but seafood is only one of many culinary delights. From specialty coffee houses and ethnic restaurants to chowder and lobster houses to elegant dining rooms, Portland makes it easy to please every palate. Other Sights Longfellow's "City by the Sea" Portland is a walkable city, and a good place to start exploring is at the Old Port with its striking buildings comprising a bevy of architectural styles, ranging from Italianate to Mansard, Queen Anne to Greek Revival. The charming streets house an amazing collection of shops, galleries, bookstores and restaurants. Congress Street and the Arts District reflect the changes of 350 years of history, boasting an engaging mixture of culture and commerce. Portland Museum of Art The museum's award-winning building is a blend of 1911 Beaux Arts and 1983 post-modernism. It houses one of New England's finest art collections. Don't miss the museum's indoor Sculpture Garden. Portland Observatory Built in 1807, this is a rare example of a signal tower from which signal flags would be flown to identify incoming vessels. Factory Outlets of Freeport About a 25-minute drive north of Portland (approximately $35 one way for a taxi), this shopping mecca is crammed with serious shoppers who come from as far away as New York. Private arrangements for independent sightseeing may be requested through the Tour Office on board.
Bar Harbor, Maine, United States image
Day 22
Bar Harbor, Maine, United States
A resort town since the 19th century, Bar Harbor is the artistic, culinary, and social center of Mount Desert Island. It also serves visitors to Acadia National Park with inns, motels, and restaurants. Around the turn of the last century the island was known as the summer haven of the very rich because of its cool breezes. The wealthy built lavish mansions throughout the island, many of which were destroyed in a huge fire that devastated the island in 1947, but many of those that survived have been converted into businesses. Shops are clustered along Main, Mount Desert, and Cottage streets. Take a stroll down West Street, a National Historic District, where you can see some fine old houses.The island and the surrounding Gulf of Maine are home to a great variety of wildlife: whales, seals, eagles, falcons, ospreys, and puffins (though not right offshore here), and forest dwellers such as deer, foxes, coyotes, and beavers.
Saint-John, New Brunswick, Canada image
Day 23
Saint-John, New Brunswick, Canada
Like any seaport worth its salt, Saint John is a welcoming place but, more than that, it is fast transforming into a sophisticated urban destination worthy of the increasing number of cruise ships that dock at its revitalized waterfront. Such is the demand that a second cruise terminal opened in 2012, just two years after the first one, and 2013 will see the two-millionth cruise passenger disembark. All the comings and goings over the centuries have exposed Saint Johners to a wide variety of cultures and ideas, creating a characterful Maritime city with a vibrant artistic community. Visitors will discover rich and diverse cultural products in its urban core, including a plethora of art galleries and antiques shops in uptown.Industry and salt air have combined to give parts of Saint John a weather-beaten quality, but you'll also find lovingly restored 19th-century wooden and redbrick homes as well as modern office buildings, hotels, and shops.The natives welcomed the French explorers Samuel de Champlain and Sieur de Monts when they landed here on St. John the Baptist Day in 1604. Then, nearly two centuries later, in May 1783, 3,000 British Loyalists fleeing the aftermath of the American Revolutionary War poured off a fleet of ships to make a home amid the rocks and forests. Two years later the city of Saint John became the first in Canada to be incorporated.Although most of the Loyalists were English, there were some Irish among them. After the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, thousands more Irish workers found their way to Saint John. It was the Irish potato famine of 1845 to 1852, though, that spawned the largest influx of Irish immigrants, and today a 20-foot Celtic cross on Partridge Island at the entrance to St. John Harbour stands as a reminder of the hardships and suffering they endured. Their descendants make Saint John Canada's most Irish city, a fact that's celebrated in grand style each March with a weeklong St. Patrick's celebration.The St. John River, its Reversing Rapids, and Saint John Harbour divide the city into eastern and western districts. The historic downtown area (locally known as "uptown") is on the east side, where an ambitious urban-renewal program started in the early 1980s has transformed the downtown waterfront. Older properties have been converted into trendy restaurants and shops, while glittering new apartment and condo buildings will take full advantage of the spectacular view across the bay. Harbour Passage, a redbrick walking and cycling path with benches and lots of interpretive information, begins downtown at Market Square and winds along the waterfront all the way to the Reversing Rapids. A shuttle boat between Market Square and the falls means you have to walk only one way. On the lower west side, painted-wood homes with flat roofs—characteristic of Atlantic Canadian seaports—slope to the harbor. Industrial activity is prominent on the west side, which has stately older homes on huge lots.Regardless of the weather, Saint John is a delightful city to explore, as so many of its key downtown attractions are linked by enclosed overhead pedways known as the "Inside Connection."
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada image
Day 24
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Surrounded by natural treasures and glorious seascapes, Halifax is an attractive and vibrant hub with noteworthy historic and modern architecture, great dining and shopping, and a lively nightlife and festival scene. The old city manages to feel both hip and historic. Previous generations had the foresight to preserve the cultural and architectural integrity of the city, yet students from five local universities keep it lively and current. It's a perfect starting point to any tour of the Atlantic provinces, but even if you don't venture beyond its boundaries, you will get a real taste of the region.It was Halifax’s natural harbor—the second largest in the world after Sydney, Australia’s—that first drew the British here in 1749, and today most major sites are conveniently located either along it or on the Citadel-crowned hill overlooking it. That’s good news for visitors because this city actually covers quite a bit of ground.Since amalgamating with Dartmouth (directly across the harbor) and several suburbs in 1996, Halifax has been absorbed into the Halifax Regional Municipality, and the HRM, as it is known, has around 415,000 residents. That may not sound like a lot by U.S. standards, but it makes Nova Scotia’s capital the most significant Canadian urban center east of Montréal.There's easy access to the water, and despite being the focal point of a busy commercial port, Halifax Harbour doubles as a playground, with one of the world's longest downtown boardwalks. It's a place where container ships, commuter ferries, cruise ships, and tour boats compete for space, and where workaday tugs and fishing vessels tie up beside glitzy yachts. Like Halifax as a whole, the harbor represents a blend of the traditional and the contemporary.
Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada image
Day 25
Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
If you come directly to Cape Breton via plane, ferry, or cruise ship, Sydney is where you’ll land. If you’re seeking anything resembling an urban experience, it’s also where you’ll want to stay: after all, this is the island’s sole city. Admittedly, it is not the booming center it was a century ago when the continent’s largest steel plant was located here (that era is evoked in Fall on Your Knees, an Oprah Book Club pick penned by Cape Bretoner Anne-Marie MacDonald). However, Sydney has a revitalized waterfront and smattering of Loyalist-era buildings that appeal to visitors. Moreover, it offers convenient access to popular attractions in the region—like the Miner’s Museum in nearby Glace Bay (named for the glace, or ice, that filled its harbor in winter), the Fortress at Louisbourg, and beautiful Bras d'Or Lake.
Southampton, England image
Day 31
Southampton, England

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

Ship Details
P&O Cruises
Arcadia

Exclusively for adults - Arcadia’s signature features such as her exterior glass-fronted lifts and expansive art collection, featuring no less than 3,000 works of art, create a sophisticated air.

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